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CALIFORNIA 

State Library. 



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Accession No. 



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INDEX-VOLUME THIRTY-TWO 

SEPTEMBER 11, 1918— SEPTEMBER 3, 1919 



All editorial matter is designated by an as- 
terisk (*). 

Title No. Page 

A 

Across Africa 42 11 

Advent of the Motor Ship 25 1 

After the Mosquitos 8 10 

African Patience 33 11 

Against Conscription * SO 7 

Aid for Foreign Born 14 11 

A "Lady" Skipper (from Brisbane 

Worker 6 9 

Alaska, Facts About 5 8 

Alaska Fishermen's Agreement 37 1 

Alaska Fishermen's Death List 20 11 

Alaska Fishermen — Death of Charles 

Larsen * 17-6: 25-7 

Alaska Reindeer Meat 19 11 

Alaska, Sulphur in 6 11 

American Citizenship * 4 6 

American Farmer's Attitu d e, Tlic s; . . . . 25 

American Federation of Labor — 

Convention Call (A. F. of L.) 33 7 

A. F. of L. Convention Notes (by 

Chester M. Wright) 41-2; 42-11 

Convention Letter, Our (by Laurence 

Todd) 42-8; 43-8 

New Conceptions of Justice (Address 
of Miss Margaret Bonfield at A. I". 

of L. Convention) 43 1 

Resolution on Sea Training Service 
of U. S. Shipping Board (Training 

Seamen *) 45 6 

Industrial Ills Dissected (Address by 
Hon. Wm. B. Wilson at A. F. of L. 

Convention) 45 7 

League of Nations. The (Including 
Address by Furuseth and Remark- 
by Gompers) 46 I 

American Labor's Reconstruction 

Problems (The Aftermath *) 22 6 

Americans Go To Sea * 34 6 

America's Example 7 2 

Amsterdam's Labor Congress * 45 6 

"Anarchistic Persuasion" * 30 6 

Ancestors of Submarines 9 9 

Ancient Ships and Sailors 13 11 

Arbitration, Compulsory, Etc. — 

Compulsory Work Laws * — In the 

United States 9 6 

Joint Conciliation Board * (for Pacific 

Coast Shipowners and Seamen) 27 6 

Wages and Hours "By Law" * 29 6 

Seaman's Claim Arbitrated (U. S. 

Shipping Commissioner) 33 1 

Arc Wages a Gift? (by James M. 

Lynch 23 11 

Arctic Explorations (by Stefansson) . . . . 40 7 

Arctic Stock Farms 40 10 

Ascent of Man, The (by Jakob Johan- 

sen) 22 11 

Asiatics, Exclusion, Etc. — 

Watch These Islands 5 10 

A Voice From Hongkong * (Merit of 

Chinese Crews) 8 6 

Japanese Imperialism 13 11 

"News" of Chinese Crews * 17 7 

Japanese Who Served In U. S. Xavv 

Naturalized 25 14 

Japan On Trial (from The Public).!! 28 2 

Chinese, The 3.^ 2 

Chinese Beggars 40 9 

Tn Japanese Courts 48 11 

The Problem of the Pacific (by Wm 

E. Ritter) 51 i 

Japanese. Merchant Marine 51 14 

I ascar Crews 52 9 

Dollar, Robert (Asiatic Policy of) — 

See "Captain" Dollar 



Title No. Page 

Atlantic Coast Strike 45-1; 46-6; 49-6 

Atlantic Flight, The First 40 10 

Atlantic Ocean, A Century's Progress 

In Crossing the * 38 6 

At the Cross Roads * 32 6 

An-ust Conception, An 5 9 

Australasian Seamen, Etc. — 

Australia's Labor Party (by E. M. 

Jauncey in The Public) 9 2 

Australia's Population 33 2 

Xew Zealand's Transports 41 11 

The Australian Seamen's Strike *... 51 6 
Autocracy, The Props of (by Professor 

Jordan — from The Public) 1 7 

Awakening, The (by Henry A. Me- 

Anarney) 44 9 

"Aryan," Burning of the 25 9 

B 

Hack to tne i.nnd * 50 

Badly Written Laws 44 9 

Badges and Pensions * 16 6 

Berne International Labor Conference. 

The 27-1; 28-1; 30-0 

Blaming the Giant Octopus (for loss 

of "Cyclops" ) 27 9 

Bolshevik, A Canadian (from The Na- 
tion) 20 2 

Bolsheviki, What ts A? 24 9 

"Bolshevism" (from Farmers' Open 

Forum) 19 11 

Boosting the Seamen's Act * 31 7 

Boycott, Reiving on the 26 3 

Boycott, Uses of the * 29 6 

Breaking Up Estates 31 9 

Britain's Xew Possessions (The Lion's 

Share *) 47 2 

Britain's Timber Resources 5 2 

British Elections, The 19 10 

British Consul's Methods (by S. B. 

Axtell) " 46 11 

British Co-Operative Movement 40 10 

British Xavv, Growth of 10 2 

British Ships Sunk During War 15 15 

British Visitors * (Tom Chambers and 

Captain Edward Tupper) 17 6 

British — see also "England" 

Bullion on "Princess Sophia" 10 2 

Burning of the "Aryan" 25 9 

C 

California Farmers "O.K." Xew Farmer- 
Labor Alliance 16 7 

California, Feudalism In 39 7 

California Legislature, The (Report by 

Paul Scharrenberg) 34 7 

California State Federation of Labor 

Convention 7 1 

California State Federation of Labor's 

Report on Reconstruction 11 1 

Call to Steel Workers 33 9 

Camouflage or Reaction? 16 11 

"Camphor Language" '. 48 9 

Canada. Harmony In 16 9 

Canada, Labor In ". 47 2 

Canada, The General Strike In * 44 6 

Canadian Bolshevik, A 20 2 

Canal Boat, A Sea-Going 3 11 

Can the Workers Pay? (by P. Brook- 

field in Australian Worker) 43 11 

Captain Dollar Explains * 20 7 

Captain Dollar's Plans * 37 6 

Cargo-Handling; Improved *., 8 7 

Casualties of War and Peace (address 

by John Mitchell) 1 1 

Cause of Social Unrest (from Christian 

Science Monitor) 45 9 

Change In Food-Habits, A 31 2 

Channel Tunnel. The 27 2 

Chantey Lore * 20 6 

"Cheap Labor" Policy, The * 3 7 



Title No. Page 

Child Labor— (A Sham Battle *) 29 6 

Child Labor 32 9 

Chinese — See "Asiatics" 

Circulation of Gold 50 10 

"Citizens of the World" (from The Mer- 
chant Mariner) 8 11 

Coal, the Use of 33 11 

Compulsory Work Laws * 9 6 

Commercialized Lying (from the Aus- 
tralian Worker) 41 9 

Compensation Laws Are of Recent Date 12 3 
Complaint from the Sick (Communica- 
tion from Jos. O'Connor) 51 9 

Concrete Freight Cars 38 10 

Concrete Ships. — 

Norway's Concrete Ships 6 11 

Launching of Concrete Ships 8 2 

A "Concrete" Convention 11 2 

Pouring Concrete 24 5 

— - ■» ». CUie- <<~.^t ,,f> ?7 5 

Concrete Ships 39 2 

Congress, Xew Bills In * 45 6 

Conscription, Against * 50 7 

Conversion of Taft, The 14 8 

Co-Operative Movement, The — 

Co-Operation * 11 6 

Co-Operation, Pointers On 11 9 

Co-Operation (The Way to Social 

Justice) 16 1 

Co-Operative Trading * 16 6 

Co-Operation tn Germany 29 10 

Co-Operation In Shipping 39 1 

Copenhagen's Harbor (from "Politiken") 27 2' 

Cost of Living, The 29 10 

Cost of Powder, The * 29-6; 42-6 

Cost of a Modern U-Boat 17 9 

Court Decisions, Maritime, Labor, Etc. — 

Right to a Discharge. The (Villarino 

et al. vs. "Munrio") 7 2 

Seamen's Injuries, Liability for (Alec 
Erickson vs. John A. Roebling's 

Sons) 3 1 

The "Lusitania" Verdict * 3 6 

Ramming a Submarine (Claim for 

damages by S. S. "Express") 5 2 

Why An Eight-Hour Workday? 

(Opinion by Umpire Walter Clark) 6 . 1 
Seamen's Status on Army Transports 10 7 
Courts Emasculate Seamen's Act 

("Nigretia") 17 1 

A "Five to Four Decision" (The 

"Talus") 19 1 

Seamen Lose Their Case ("Rhine- 

Windrush") 20 7 

U. S. Maritime Law Supreme (the 

"Martha") 21 7 

Dillon vs. "Strathearn" Case 22 7 

Injuries to Ship's Barber ("Shinyo 

Maru") 23 2 

Rights of Injured Seamen (Booth 

S. S. Co.) 23 7 

Seamen's Rights In Hawaii (By Geo. 

A. Davis) 25 7 

A Substantial Award* (The "Cricket") 27 6 
Validity of Advance Wages ("Rhine- 

Windrush") 30 1 

Seamen's Act Constitutional (The 

"Strathearn") 31 1 

Shipowner Mulcted (The "Masaba") 32 7 / 
Jury Find for Seaman (Ali Moham- 
med) 34 10 

Dillon vs. "Strathearn" 36 10 

When Half Wages Are Due ("West- 

meatb" and Italier") 37 7 

An Unusual Verdict ("Philadelphia") 37 11 
Courts Assail Union Treasury (Coro- 

nado Coal Co.) 38 7 

Wages and Seaworthiness ("Gray's 

Harbor") 40 11 



T.HE. SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX — VOLUME THIRTY-TWO 

" '. • : .v r>: '": i "• •' •'•• • • • 

Htle * • •"*•• ' ' No" Pa Title No. Page Title 



Crimping System, The (by Arthur E. 

Albrecht) 44 1 

Cunard Line's Heavy Loss 17 9 

"Cyclops," Mystery of (Blaming the 

Giant Octopus) 27 9 

D 

Danger Ahead! 13 9 

Dangers of a World at Peace l from 

Boston Traveler) 11 9 

Danish-Icelandic Agreement •• 16 2 

"Davy Junes" Peeved * (Re tule life 

preservers) 47 6 

Dealing With Unrest 27 9 

Debs, Eugene Victor. Conviction of (The 

Hughes Law) 34 11 

Decree Abolishing Classes, A (Russ 

Soviet) 33 9 

Defense of Seamen's Act (by U. S. Sen- 
ator Fletcher) 18 1 

Delusions of Democracy 32 2 

Democracy and Profits * 9 6 

Democracy in Industry (by John A. 

Fitch,' in The Survey) 26 1 

Democracy In Industry (from American 

Photo-Engraver) 40 2 

Derelict, What is a? 4 11 

Diamonds and Antwerp 48 2 

Disastrous Year, A (Wrecks, etc.) 26 11 

Discipline Aboard Ship * (The ''Puako") 27-6; 33-6 

Distribution of Wealth. The * 19 6 

Doom of Empires, The 24 2 

Dreams and Thrones 42 7 

Drifting Mines (from Washington Star) 27 

Drift of the Tide. The 28 7 

Drifting on An Ice Floe 14 11 

Duty, a Daily 22 9 



"Eastland" Disaster (Same Old Story*) 11 6 
nomic Freedom, Thoughts on (by 

Robert 1 tunter) U 

Education, The Value of 2 1 

Education, What is? (Bruce Calvert in 

The Open Road) 5 2 

Echoes From Heme (from The Survey); 

also 27-1 and 28-1 30 9 

imic Trust, An? * 40 7 

Effects of Demobilization * 19 7 

Eight Hours in France 41 10 

Election I Expenses , 31 2 

Eloquence of Silence. The (by Chester 

M. Wright! ' 4 9 

Embarcation Service. Our 2S 7 

England, Doings in 12 9 

England Keeps Her Mead 9 11 

England Ruled bv Foreigners 20 

England, Progress In ' <( > n 

England, What's Doing in * 40 6 

Ericsson's Galley, Was It? 40 2 

Essentials of Sea-Power (by U. S. Sen- 
ator Duncan V. Fletcher) 10 1 

Europe, What's Doing In * 11 6 

Every Man a Cripple 49 10 

Excessive Turno\ ers 29 3 

Expenses of Congress 45 11 

Expensive Inefficiency 13 9 



Facts. About Struggling Russia 48 1^ 

'Facts About Sugar 14 8 

Female Voters in Sweden 42 10 

Feudalism in California 39 7 

"Fifth Sense" and the Sextant 9 9 

File Your Claims* (Submarines) 14 6 

Finland, Unhappy * 27 7 

First Atlantic Flight 40 10 

Fisheries, Etc. — 

Dcepsea Trawlers * 2 7 

1 1 erring Resources 3 9 

Yankee Whalers. The 9 8 

Salmon Eggs, Collection of 9 9 

Swordfish Weighing 917 Pounds Caught 

in Hawaiian Waters 13 14 

Whale Steaks 20 9 

Modern Whaling 26 2 

Food Fish from the Gulf 3 

Siberian Fishing Rights 42 9 

Sea Food and Geography 43 9 

Whaling Oft" the Falklands 47 11 

Of Interest to Fishermen (Report by 

P. B. Gill) 48 7 

"Flu" In Capetown. The 32 9 

Flying Age, The * 41 7 

Foreign Horn, Aid for 14 11 

Foreign Interests Oppose Seamen's Law 18 3 

Foundations Without Excavations 20 9 

"Fraternity," In the Name of 11 9 

Freedom of the Seas (from The Na- 
tion) 15-7; 18-10 

Free Letter Postage in Russia 33 11 

Free Safe Deposit Service 50 9 

Free Speech (from Trie Australian . 

Worker) 6 2 

French Labor Declaration. A 40 9 

Fundamentals of Peace * 3 6 

Furuseth, Andrew, Articles by. Etc. — 

Furuseth, Appreciation of (by S. A. 

Axtell) 5 9 

Furuseth Object s * 7 6 

Furuseth, More Praise for (by Rev. 

George McPherson Hunter) 8 2 

Furuseth on Overtime Pay 9 3 

Seamen and Sea Power 13 1 

Furuseth's Work in Europe * 19 6 



Furuseth in France * 21 

Seamen's Condition in Europe 38 

Furuseth's Report * 38 

Furuseth on the League of Nations... 4b 

Seamen's Law Benefits 48 

Future of the World, The 29 

Future of U. .S. Shipping, The (from The 

Public) 12 



Gasoline. Substitute for 16 

( rathering J lead way * 31 

Gem of Truth, A Stray * 7 

German Government Apart from People 5 

German Liberty? 10 

German Salvage Studies (from Nauticus) 22 

German Shipping 39 

German Ships, The (from S. F. Star).. 24 

Germany's Urgent Need 3 

Getting at the Truth (from International 

Mulders' Journal) 49 

Going, Going! Gone!!* (Sale of Vessels 

by Shipping Board) 49 

Gold on Lower Yukon 44 

Good Poetry * 14 

rnment Ownership of U. S. Mer- 
chant Marine * 35 

Government vs. Private Control 3 

Governors Stain! I'.y President 7 

"Great Day," The (by James M. Lynch) 13 

Great Lakes — 

May Tugboats Taken From Lakes. 

Concrete Shipyard at Detroit 12 

Co-ordination on the Lakes 14 

First Lake-Built Concrete Craft 29 

< dander. Victor A. * 32 

Re-equipment of Lakes Vessels to 

Burn Oil Instead of Coal 36 

Guarding Uncle Sam's Interests * 5 



H 



Habit of Thrift. The 40 

Harbor Transportation * 41 

I lard to Please 34 

Harmony in Canada 16 

Health Insurance — 

Well Financed Opposition * 8 

ior Camouflage (from The Industrial 

Weekly) 9 

Health Insurance Endorsed 11 

Health Insurance, Need for 12 

Why Health Insurance? ?i7 

Insurance Against Sickness 39 

Health Almanac, A Real 2S 

Health Instructions 4 

I [ealth, ( >ur Army's 2 

Health Record. \ Noteworthy * 2 

His "Social Position" * 44 

Holland's Vessels Requisitioned * 38 

Home Front, The * 5 

of the Tornado 39 

rkonp A Voice Fr (Merit of. 

Chinese Crews) 8 

I (onolulu Harbor 13 

Huge Ship Profits 25 

Human Rights First! 'League of Na- 
tions) 26 



"Ideals" for the Ash Can (from The 

Nation) 11 

Illiteracy in South 44 

Immigration, Etc. — 

Wartime Immigration * 

Labor and Immigration * 

Immigration and Wages 

Labor's Immigration Policy * 

Improved Cargo-Handling * 

Industrial Autocracy (from The Tobacco 

Worker) 

Industrially "Free!" * 

Industrial Unionism * 

Industrial Unity * 

Injunctions, Government by, Etc. — 

Injunction Issue. The 

Inquisition in India (Re the Rowlatt 

Bills) 

"Inscription Maritime" * 

Insect Language 

Insidious Attack, An 

Interior of a "Tank" 

"International Agreement" * 

International Labor Congress (Echoes 

from Berne) 27-1 ; 28 

International Seafarers' Conference at 

London 25-6;* 34-6;* 35 

International Seamen's Union of America. 



30 



2 
6 

6 

3 

11 

11 

2 

11 

11 



6 

11 

7 

6 
3 

9 

> 



14 
14 

2 
14 

7 

14 
6 



2 
6 

10 
9 



2 
9 

11 
9 

11 
2 

9 
6 
6 

7 
6 
9 

6 
9 
3 



2 



6 

2 
6 

7 

11 
6 
6 
6 



50 


11 


4 


6 


10 


9 


S 


8 


10 


9 


46 


6 



-1: 30-9 
1; 36-1 



The President's Message to Seamen.. 5-1; 6-6 

Convention Call (I. S. U. of A.) 12 10 

The I. S. U. of A. * 13 

The I. S. U. Convention * 20 

The I. S. U. Convention (Summary of 

President's and Secretary's reports) 21 

Sniping the Seamen's Law * 21 

Mr. Howard Heard From * 21 

Proceedings of I. S. U. of A. Conven- 
tion 22-1 ; 

Work of the Convention * 23 

Seamen's Act, The (from Washington 

Post) 26 2 

Seamen's Act Must Stand (from S. F. 

Star) 26 9 



6 
6 

1 
6 
6 

23-1 
6 



No. Page 



Seamen's Act. Purpose of the 27 7 

Seamen's Act Championed (by S. B. 

Axtell) U 1 

Seafarers' Conference (Report by 

American delegates) 35-1 ; 36-1 

Why An "Advisory Council?" * 36 6 

Seamen's Act, Results of 36 7 

The Seamen's Act (from Springfield. 

Mass., Republican) 38 9 

The Washington Conference * 38-6; 41-6 

Seamen's Act, The (from The New- 
Republic I 43 7 

Preference to Unionists (Re \tlantic 

Coast Seamen's Strike) 45 1 

A. I - ', of L, Resolution on Sea Training 
Service of U. S. Shipping Hoard 

( Training Seamen*) 45 6 

Atlantic Coast Strike, The * 46 6 

Language Test (New Rules Regarding 

Same i 47 1 

A Strike Well Settled * 49 6 

Progress on the Pacific * 50 6 

In the Heart of a Fool (Review) 36 11 



Japanese See "Asiatics" 

lob In Great Demand. A * 28 6 

Jolt for Mr. Blanton, A * 47 6 

Justice and the Ex- Kaiser (from Aus- 
tralian Worker) 32 10 

Justice for Tom Mooney * 13 7 

Justice for Mooney * 44 7 

Justice In Industry * ?>7 6 



K 



Kaiser of French Descent 51 



ibor and Business (Roger W. Ba 

in The Public > 

and Red Cross * 

abor Comes Forward 

ment on : 

abor Day Message, A (by I. B. Dale), 
abor Day. 1919 (by Frank Morrison).. 

in Canada 

abor in Germany 

abor in League <if Nations 

abor Laws of 1918, New 

ali. n. \o Funds for (by Grant Hamil- 
ton ) 

ibor Not a Commodity 

n I Eemisphere United . . 
Outlook on the Future (by Ar- 
thur Henderson) 

Reconstruction Problem c (The 

A fterrhath* > 

and. and Land Tax See also "Taxa- 
tion. Single Tax, Etc.".' 

and Holdings, Large, in California;- 
The Remedies 

and Holdings. Large, .in England 

( Breaking I 'p Est tes 

Follette's Comment on the Senate's 
Action (A Belated Pn 

arsen, Charles, Death of * 

ascar Crews 

ast Word, The * 

hip, Recognition of (from ad- 
dress by Frank P, Walsh I 



League of Nations- 



Why "A League of Nations"" .(by 

Frank P. Walsh) ". 

League of Nations (Human Rights 

St*) 

League of Nations. Labor in the 

League of Nations. The (by Walter 

Macarthur) 

■ n From 1 1 istory, A : ' 

lie of Nations, The (Speeches, 
etc, at A. F, of L. Convention).... 

is. More * 

.incoln's Birthday 

.incoln On Wa 

ion's Share, Tb Britain's New 

I 'ossessii ins) 

.isbon as an Aerial Port 

.loyd's and the War 

""I of Public Planned (by Geo. P. 

1 lampton i 

.osses From Strikes * 

.ower California (from the S. F. Star), 
umber. On Waste of 



39 



.'4 



I. 



M 

Majority Rule * 

Making the World Safe. etc. * 

Malekulans, The 

Mammon is Merciless 

Manning of Norwegian Ships 

Manufacture of "Mines," The * 

Manufactured "News" * 

Manley Succeeds Walsh 

Marine Insurance * 

Manning of "Mara" 

Meaning of "Paravane" 

Meaning of the "Plumb Plan" 

Measuring Rivers 

Medieval Theory of Shipwrecks 

"Mental Responsibility" * 

Merchant Marine, U. S. (Government 

Ownership* ) 

Merchant Seamen, Tribute to 

Merchant Ships for Hrazil ■• 

Merchant Ships Now Building in the 

World 



11 



4') 


1 


14 


6 


28 


9 


51 


7 


51 


2 


51 


3 


47 


2 


47 


7 


26 


9 


1 


10 


30 


10 


49 


9 


13 


3 


9 


1 


22 


6 



26 


6 


26 


9 


26 


10 


28 


'i 


46 


9 


48 


6 


23 


9 


8 


9 


47 


2 


49 


2 


7 


7 


46 


7 


48 


6 


25 


9 


39 


10 


7 


6 


28 


7 


49 


2 


5 


11 


36 


9 


4 


7 


14 


6 


15 


2 


14 


6 


17 


9 


49 


9 


50 


1 


4 


11 


50 


11 


9 


7 


8 


2 


13 


8 



24 11 



?1 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME THIRTY-TWO 



Title 



No. Page 



Mexico — 

Cause of Anti-Mexican Feeling, The.. 6 3 

Stirring Up Mexico 24 2 

Is Mexico Next? (from The Nation).. 24 9 

Making Mexico "Safe" 33 9 

War With Mexico; Why? (by Manuel 

Carpio) 52 7 

M iles of Lumber * '24 6 

Misrepresentation ! * 46 6 

Modern Transportation (John P. Young 

in S. F. Chronicle) 31 7 

Miner's War Work, The 7 10 

Misplaced Jurisdiction * 24 6 

Mississippi Barge Fleet, The 11 7 

Mobbing the Mobbers 9 7 

Modern Bucko Methods * ("Gamble").. 16 6 

Money in Savings Banks * 5 7 

Mooney Congress, The 24 7 

Mooney, Tom, Justice For *....13-7; 33-6; 44-7 

Motor Ship, Advent of the 25 1 

Mosquitoes, After the 8 10 

Murders Decreasing 33 10 

Muzzling Union Speakers 50 7 

N 

Nationalizing the Railroads 50 1 

Naturalization, The Oath of 1 11 

Navigation in the Air 42 10 

Navy — See "U. S. Navy" 

Need for Ocean Tonnage, The 12 7 

New Bills in Congress * 45 6 

New Bogey, The (from Sydney Worker) 38 11 

"News" of Chinese Crews * 17 7 

New York, Crimping System at 44 1 

New York Strike, The * 19 6 

New Zealand's Transports 41 11 

Noah, Was He a Piker? 3 9 

Non-Partisan League Doctrines 33 2 

Non-Partisan League ( Watch North 

Dakota!*) 44 6 

Norway's Heavy Loss 12 9 

Norway's Mercantile Shipping 28-2; 50-2 

Norway's Revised Losses 41 11 

Norwegian Ships. Manning of 

Xo Scarcity of Officers * 8 6 



Obstacles (by Henry A. McAnarney) . . . Id 9 

"Oh, Horrors!" * " 51 6 

"< >ld Stuff" * 22 7 

"Our Big Union" 47 10 

One Problem Solved 42 10, 

Oratory in the Senate 11 9" 

Our Washington Letter (by Laurence 

Todd). See issues 1 to 52 

P 

Pacific Shipowners Organize * 32 6 

Panama Canal Traffic 26 2 

Partnership in Production (by Walter 

Macarthur) 47 2 

Passing of Capitalism (by Jacob Johan- 

sen) ." 39 10 

Peace — See also "War, Militarism, Etc." 

Peace, Fundamentals of * 3 6 

Peace and Royalty (from The Nation).. 17 2 

Peace at Last! * 43 6 

Peace Conference, The * 12-6; 13-6 

Peaceful Revolution (from The Painter 

& Decorator) SO 9 

Peace Treaty, The (from S. F. Call).... 38 11 
Pensions, An Analysis of (reprinted 

from The Public) 1 9 

"Perfectly Simple" * 39 6 

Pertinent Comment * 51 6 

Plea for World Brotherhood 10 2 

Plenty of Captains * 42 6 

Plimsoll Mark. The * 42 6 

Plumb Plan, Meaning of the 50 1 

Poetrv — 

I'he Right to Work (In Edwin Mark- 
ham) 38 2 

"No Annexations" (by W. N. Ewer).. 39 11 

Life's Combat (by C M. Cook) 41 10 

The Strike (by Covington Hall) 46 9 

Mind Over Matter (from Tit-Bits).... 52 10 

Pointers on Co-operation 11 9 

Port of Ostend, The 46 9 

Port Performances * 2 7 

Powers of U. S. Court Assumed 42 3 

Prehistoric Astronomy 6 11 

President's Message, The * 6 6 

President's Message to Seamen 5 1 

President's Sound Advice. The * 2 6 

Pre-War Wage Level, The (Frank P. 

Walsh) 13 2 

Problems of Reconstruction (Report of 

Cal. State Federation Committee)... 11 1 
Problem of the Pacific, The (by Wm. 

E. Ritter) 51 1 

Profit and Subsidy * 39 6 

Profit-Sharinp Fallacy, The (from Aus- 
tralian Worker) 5 2 

Profit-Sharing Plan 30 3 

Program, An Ambitious * (S. F. Cham- 
ber of Commerce Shipping Policy).. 48 6 

Progress Abroad 2 11 

Progress, A Century's * (Crossing of 

Atlantic) 38 6 

Progress in England * 30 6 

Progressive Seattle * 6 7 

Prohibition ("Wets" versus "Drys"*) . . . 36 7 

Proud of Their Jobs 2 11 

Prussian Labor Policies 24 11 

Prussians Outside of Germany 33 11 



Title No. Page 

"Puako," Brutality on the. ..27-6; 32-6; 33-6; 35-7 

Public vs. Private Control 33 2 

Purpose of the Seamen's Act 27 7 

Pushed Off the Earth 17 9 

Q 

Queen Elizabeth's Navy 15 11 

Questionnaire, The * 2 6 

R 

Railroads, The * 30 6 

Reconstruction and the People 15 1 

Reconstruction in California (State Fed. 

of Labor Report) 11 1 

Reconstruction Problems * 9 6 

Reconstruction Problems (The After- 
math*) 22 6 

Record Cargo Handling * 7 6 

Record of the Cherokees 33 11 

Red Fleet of Russia, The (from The 

Nation) 17 7 

Red Revolution, The (from The Public) 14 9 
"Red Terror" in Europe, The (from The 

Nation) 13 7 

Reforms in Sweden 29 10 

Reindeer, The 16 11 

Relative Values 43 11 

Relying on the "Boycott" 26 3 

Repression or Reconstruction? (bv Basil 

Manly) '. 41 1 

Requisitioned Hutch Ships, The * 38 7 

Resources (by Henry A. McAnarney)... 50 2 
Respectable (?) Scabs (from Queensland 

Worker) 36 11 

Results of Seamen's Act 36 7 

Re-Training the Crippled (by Douglas C. 

McMurtrie) ' 25 10 

"Right to Quit, The" 3 7 

Rivetless Steel Ship, The 8 7 

Rosseter, John H. (Assumes Duty as 

Chief of Division of Operations for 

the U. S. Shipping Board ) 1 6 

Rough Treatment (by Alexander S. 

Maelnnis) ' 5 11 

Rubin, W. B., Articles by — 

Many That Are First. Etc 7 11 

Peace 15 9 

Legal Jurisdiction 2(1 1 

"Divine Rights" of Courts 26 2 

What Is Bolshevism? 28 11 

Feed Humanity and Save It 30 9 

Post-War Reflections 35 11 

Minimum Need, The 38 9 

Ideals of War, The 39 9 

Swat the Injunction! 47 9 

Running Our Basting Down 43 9 

Russia — 

"Chaotic Russia" (from New York 

Call) 6 9 

Russia's Red Fleet 17 7 

Truth About Russia, The (from New 

York Call) 23 9 

Russia, Saving U 11 

Russia. Facts About Struggling 48 1 

S 

Sailers' Union of the Pacific — 

California's Labor Conclave (Report 
of Sailors' Delegates to Cal. State 

Fed. of Labor Convention) 7 1 

Meeting. A Memorable (Chambers and 
Tupper from British Seamen's Union 

at San Francisco) 18 2 

In Memoriam * (Frank Johnson) 1°. 7 

Eulogy, An Eloquent* (Frank John- 
son) ' 21 6 

Sixth of March, The * 26 6 

Joint Conciliation Board * 27 6 

"Puako" Prosecution for Brutal Treat- 
ment of Seamen 27-6; 32-2; 33-6; 35-7 

Delegate's Report (Washington State 

Federation of Labor) 44 7 

Wage Negotiations Concluded (Prog- 
ress on the Pacific*) 50 6 

DECEASED MEMBERS. 

Alsin, Albert 50 7 

Alton, John 12 7 

Andersen, Carl 23 7 

Anderson, Carl Robert 33 7 

Andersson, Conrad W 7 7 

Andersson, Hilding (correction) 12 7 

Andreassen, Carl A 25 7 

Asklund, August E 10 7 

Beahan. Edward 13 7 

Beck, Eugene A. G 8 7 

Belin, Anton Erick 9 7 

Bengtson, Carl Johan 11 7 

Benson, John F.mil ,. 26 7 

Borden, James 27 7 

Campbell, Robert 22 7 

Carlsen, Charles L 22 7 

Carlsen, Johan Ludvig 40 7 

Carlsen, Severin 6 7 

Carlson, Peter 12 7 

Carron, Edward 27 7 

Christensen, Peter V 7 7 

Coleman, Bertin 9 7 

Darling, Howard 9 7 

De Zoiner, Adriaan 19 7 

Duffey, Edward 10 7 

Dunba. John J 29 7 

Dunkel, Charles 14 7 



Title No. Page 

Eikland, Ole 32 7 

Eisner, Karl G. M 45 7 

Ekelin, Ernst W 44 7 

Eklof, John F 39 7 

Eklund, William 7 7 

Ericksen, Edward M 8 7 

Erickson, John 27 7 

Evans, Norman 9 7 

Ferrister, James 29 7 

Frederiksen, John 37 7 

Fredrikson, Axel 9 7 

Friend. Arthur E 8 7 

Funk, Elmer 8 7 

Greenlund, Charley 11 7 

Gruse, Karl J _ 8 7 

Gundersen, Andrew 21 7 

Haak, Reinhold K. M 9 7 

Hanholm, Henry 9 7 

Hansen, Hartvig 31 7 

Hansen, Isack 24 7 

Helgesen, Einar 39 7 

Helin, Johannes 31 7 

Hemnes, Anders 15 7 

Hendersen, Robert D 4 7 

Henriksen, Rauder 13 7 

Hertig, Erwin 14 7 

Holden, Olaf Martin 7 7 

Horn, John 7 7 

Hubberd, Howard C 8 7 

Huovi, John 1 45 7 

Jacobsen, Andrew 2 7 

Jansson, Anders Gustaf 2 7 

Johannessen, Nils 27 7 

Johansen, Rudolf A 8 7 

Johanson, J, W. Antonius 20 7 

Johnson, Frank 19 7 

Johnson, Olaf 5 7 

Jonassen, Johannes Olai 19 7 

Joranson. Frank 44 7 

Kambi. Robert 8 7 

Kelso. Murl Lawrence 24 7 

Karlsen, Victor 10 7 

Koppel, Carl 42 7 

Land, Derk f > 7 

tarsen, Claus Ludvig 31 7 

I .arsen, Peter A 17 7 

Larsson, Carl 17 7 

Lehtonen, Emil Arthur 8 7 

Ligget, Walter 9 7 

Lindblad, Conrad W 37 7 

Lindblad, Gustav 12 7 

Lindgvist, Frank 8 7 

Ljungquist, Albert 11 7 

Lofgren, Carl W 24 7 

Lotus, Fred 51 7 

Lund. Carl 12 7 

Lundberg, Carl W 19 7 

Lundbersr. Harris G 7 7 

Lundquist, Peter E 18 7 

Macey, Stewart 9 7 

Madec, Vincent 8 7 

Magnussen, Harold R 8 7 

Malmberg, Henry W 48 7 

Mardison, Andrew 5 7 

Marmion, James J 28 7 

Martinson, Alex 33 7 

Marx. Thorvald 7 7 

Mathews, Tohn 31 7 

Matsuk, Michail 10 7 

Middlemass, Andrew 8 7 

Miller, John 38 7 

Miller. Thomas 48 7 

Morron, Joseph 52 7 

Muller, Robert 35 7 

Murray, David B 9 7 

Nordman, Johan 9 7 

Norris, Edward 11 7 

Odenberg, Adolf 11 7 

Ohls, John 20 7 

Olsen, Hilmuth 25 7 

Olsen, Olai S 10 7 

Olsen, Ole 8 7 

Olsen, Thomas 29 7 

Olsen, William 9 7 

Onensen, Bernt 44 7 

Paulsen, Peter 44 7 

Persson, Ernest G 13 7 

Petersen, Ferdinand B 47 

Petersen, Nicolai 6 7 

Peterson, John 8 7 

Pettersen, Axel 51 7 

Petterson, Anders J 22 7 

Petterson, Knut A 23 7 

Pietch, Frank R 9 7 

Poere, Edward C 10 7 

Puntti, Armas 23 7 

Quickman, W \ 22 7 

Quinn, Wm. Michael 9 7 

Ramlow, Emil 18 7 

Randa, Rudolph 14 7 

Rasanen, Geo. F 8 7 

Rasmussen, James H 10 7 

Roalsen, Fred E 24 7 

Rosenquist, A. W 23 7 

Ross. Herman A 31 7 

Simonson, Thomas 9 7 

Smith, Tan 51 7 

Smith, John F 27 7 

Stein, Tngvald Larsen 34 7 

Tenfjord, Edvin 12 7 

Thomas, Henry 8 7 

Thompson, David 35 7 

Thorstensen, Sigurd 8 7 

Traynor, A. P 4 7 

Trovik, Harold 26 7 

Virtanen, Leonard 31 7 

Wahlbcrg, Samuel 1 21 

Ward, Karl Sanford 8 7 

Weltz, Hill 37 7 

Werford, Frank 27 7 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL I NDEX— VOLUME THI RTY-TWO 



Title No. Page 

Westerberg, Erick A 47 

Wetzel, Carl Curt 2 7 

Wilhelm, Frantz 21 7 

Wilis, George 5 7 

Wiren, Gustaf A 20 7 

Wohlschon, Albert 3 7 

Woldhouse, John _> s 7 

Yerna. Frank 52 7 

Sailors' Wives * 31 6 

Salmon Eggs, Collection of 9 9 

Salt in United States 45 11 

Salvage Vessels. Unique 46 11 

Same Old Story. The* (the "Eastland") 11 6 

San Francisco — 

Justice in San Francisco (Densmore 

report) 12 1 

M r. Fickert Unmasked * 12 6 

What's Wrong in San Francisco?*... 15 7 

Fickert's Latest Move * 17 6 

Fickert Whitewashed * 20 7 

Xolan, Ed., The Vindication of 

(Mooney Case) 29 9 

Schoolship for San Francisco * 33 6 

San Francisco Training Ship (A 

"Democratic" Schoolship*) 43 7 

San Francisco Labor Clarion's Intol- 
erance 45-7; 47-7 

Saving Russia 34 11 

Saving the "U"-Boat's Victims 6 7 

"Scarcity" of Labor?, The * 6 7 

School, "A Worth While 40 9 

Schoolship, A "Democratic" * 43 7 

Sea Freedom ?, What is * 18 6 

Seamen's Act — See "International Sea- 
men's Union of America" 

Seamen's Franchise, The (by S. 13. Ax- 
tell) 45 2 

Seamen's Language Text (New Rules 

Regarding Same) 47 1 

Seamen of the World Unite * 25 6 

Seamen's Status on Transports (Subject 

to military law, etc.) 10 7 

Seamen's Wages Abroad (Fairy Tales*) 51 6 

Seamen's Wages, German 2 11 

Seamen's Wages in Europe * (See also 

51-7) # .. 27 7 

Seamen's Work. What Is? * 52 6 

Seattle Strike, The * 23 6 

Secret Diplomacy (from The Nation) ...• 19 7 

Seditious Literature! * 30 6 

Self-Determination (by Wm. P. Harvey) 49 7 

Selling Labor Power * 39 6 

Shipbuilders and Seafarers : 5 6 

Shipbuilding, Facts On * 5-7: 23-7 

Shipping Board, The United States — 

Rncsptsr. T-=>lin Tf 1 ils tt t lin ca Dutj o^ 

Chief of. Division of Operations).... 1 6 

Shipping Board's Report, The * 15 6 

Shipping Board Publicity * 26 7 

Chairman Hurley's Report on His 

Mission Abroad 29 1 

Shipping Board, The * 40 6 

Shipping Board Finances 41 7 

Shipping Board's Sea Training Service 
Criticized at A. F. of L. Convention 

(Training Seamen*) 45 6 

Shipbuilding— The Official Facts 2 9 

Shipping Facts and Figures 8 11 

Shipping Finance * 17 6 

Shipping in the Treaty 38 2 

Shipping Policy of S. F. Chamber of 
Commerce (An Ambitious Pro- 
gram*) 48 6 

Shipping Via Iceland 43 10 

Ships Operated by Navy * 8 7 

Ships Without Rivets, Steel 3 10 

Shipwrecks (See also "Wrecks") 50 11 

Shipyard Lays Keel. Seized 5 8 

"Shop Committee," The * 25 6 

Siberia, An Unknown Land 32 9 

Six-Hour Day, The 35 3 

Sniping the Seamen's Law * 21 6 

Spanish Influenza * 6 6 

Speaking of Copper (by Frank E. Wolfe) 26 7 

Spitzbergen's Future 16 9 

Social U'nrest. Cause of 45 9 

Sound Advice * 36 6 

Spartacus; Who Was 24 10 

Stability 23 10 

State Insurance Cheapest 11 3 

Steady Work Essential 4 11 

Steel Autocracv Must Capitulate 46 3 

Steel Trust Becomes Generous 4 9 

Stirring Up Mexico 24 2 

Stooping the Engines * 1 6 

Stefansson's Explorations (from Chris- 
tian Science Monitor) 40 7 

Strange Cargo, A * 19 6 

Strange Paradox, A (from Australian 

Worker) 17 2 

Strike in Canada, The * 44 6 

Sturdv Stock (by Henry A.McAnarney) 3 2 

Substitute for Gasoline 16 2 

Substitutes for Justice *' 42 6 

Suez Canal Statistics 46 11 

Success, A Word About 48 2 

Success to the Chief* (John H. Ros- 

setcr) 1 6 

Surpluses and Taxes * 11 7 

Surrender of German Fleet 14 7 

Sweden, Reforms Tn 29 10 

Swedish Living Bell 9 9 

T 

Taxation, Single Tax, Etc. — 

Tax All Idle Land * 18 6 



Title No. Page 

The Income Tax * 26 6 

Single Tax Idea (.rows 36 10 

Remedies for Large Land Holdings 
i Report of Cal. Commission on Im- 
migration and Housing) 39 7 

Textbooks In Citizenship 14 9 

Thoughts On Economic Freedom (by 

Robert Hunter) 34 1 

Thoughts on Free Speech 10 6 

Tli, ,ughi Provoker, A (from Upton Sin- 
clair's Magazine) 8 9 

Threshing Old Straws * 49 6 

Timely Topics Discussed 34 9 

o and Speed 17 2 

"To Bid Freely!" * 30 6 

Tolerance in the Labor Press (S. F. 

Labor Clarion) 45-7: 47-7 

Tornado. Home of the 39 9 

Trade Wars 23 10 

Training Seamen * (by the Shipping 

Hoard ) 45 6 

Training Merchant Seamen * 1 6 

Trans-Atlantic Flight, Cost of 41 14 

Transportation Problems 2 9 

Transporting Rubber 33 10 

Trawlers, Deepsea * 2 7 

Self-Expressii in * 41 6 

Treasure Island 40 11 

Tribute to Labor, A 16 11 

Tribute to Merchant Seamen 8 2 

Triumph of Democracy, The * H> 6 

Tunnel. A Seven-Mile 42 10 

U 

Uncle Sam's Sales * 42 6 

Unemployment Insurance Opposed 31 3 

Unhappy Finland * 27 7 

Unique Salvage Vessels 46 11 

Union Label, The * 30 7 

Uruguay, Tn 47 11 

U. S. Adjustment Agencies 8 Q 

U. S. Employment Agencies * 25 7 

U. S. Junker's. The * 15 6 

U. S. Liberty Loans, The— 

Fourth Liberty Loan, The * 1 7 

Liberty Bonds, Hold Your 1 11 

Liberty Loan, Seamen and the * 2 6 

"Your" Part in the Drive * 3 6 

Did You Buy Your Bond? * 4 6 

Fifth Liberty Loan 13 11 

Don't Sell Your Bond * 18 7 

Six Months to Pay (Victory Bonds).. 34 10 

U. S. Loans to Farmers 6 2 

U. S. Merchant Marine (Government 

( Ownership*) 35 6 

(_*. S Merchant .Marine Statistics (An 

Unmatched Record*) 46 6 

U. S. Merchant Vessels Lost During 

War 12 14 

U. S. Navy (Our Growing Navy*) 36 6 

U. S. Navy Program for 1920 15 11 

U. S. Navy, Ships Operated by * 8 7 

U. S. Railroads, Nationalizing of the.... 50 1 

U. S. Shipping Hoard — See "Shipping 

Board" 

U. S. Shipbuilding (Another Record 

Breaker*) . . . .' 10 7 

U S. Standard of Living. The 40-1; 52-1 

Use of Coal. The 33 11 

Uses of the Rovcott * 29 6 

Utah's Timber Lands 14 9 

"Utopian Moonshine!" * 24 6 

V 

Value of Election Returns 32 11 

Victor Hugo on the Mob 6 10 

Vindication of Xolan, The (Mooney 

-el i. .". 29 9 

"Votes for Seamen" 24-9; 51-9 

W 

Wages Versus Finances (by Frank P. 

Walsh) „.. 8 1 

Wage Adjustment Boards * 6 6 

.Wages and Hours "By Law" * 29 6 

- and Wars 32 2 

Wages Versus Prices * 41 6 

Wages Vs. Public Health 14 1 

Waiting to be Saved (from Australian 

Worker) 31 10 

Wall St. Democracy 36 11 

Wanted — More Consuls 9 10 

Want U. S. to Sell Ships 15 10 

War, Militarism, Etc. — 

Subiects Related to Peace — See also 

" Peace" 

War With Mexico — See "Mexico" 

When Will the War End? (from 

United Mine Workers' Journal).... 1 2 

Insurance, Soldier and Sailor * 2 2-7 

War Food Prices 4 2 

Program for World's Peace, A 4 3 

Protection for Enlisted Men 4 7 

After-War Conditions (from The Pub- 
lic) 5 7 

Army Units 5 9 

Soldiers' Mail, The 8 10 

Military Insurance * 9 7 

War-Time Labor Laws 9 9 

War- Work Drive, The * 10 6 

Germany's Unconditional Surrender... 10 15 

Surrender of the German Fleet 14 7 

Our Disabled Fighters * 16 6 

War Record. A Splendid (Canadian 

Pacific S. S. Co.) 18 9 



Title No. I 

American Labor's Reconstruction 

Problems (The Afterliath*) 22 6 

Women at Peace Conference 28 9 

Military Training : 29 7 

Sinking the German Fleet (from Xau- 

ticus) 31 9 

Plea for Disarmament. A 32 11 

"Shipping" in the Peace Treaty '. . 38 2 

Problems of Demobilization (by Hon. 

Wm. B. Wilson) '. 42 1 

"June 28th" in History 44 11 

The Lion's Share (Great Britain's New 

Possessions) 47 2 

Washington Letter, Our (by Laurence 

Todd). See issues 1 to 52 

Watch Xorth Dakota! * 44 (, 

Way to Social Justice (by James P. 

Warbasse ) 16 1 

"Wets" Versus "Drvs" * 36 7 

Whaling. Modern 26 2 

Whale-Steaks 20 9 

Whaling Off the Falklands 47 11 

What Ails .Americans? *.... 47 6 

What Is a Bolsheviki? 24 9 

What Is Seamen's Work? * 52 6 

Whither Are We Drifting? 11 11 

Why Hold Back' 30 10 

Why Ships Float 15 9 

Wild Animal Trade 33 9 

Women Workers < hganize 31 9 

Wooden Ships, Our * 22 6 

Wooden Ships, Sale of * 34 6 

Wood Ships Still Useful 42 7 

World's Merchant Shipping, The 29 1 

World's Seafarers Confer * 34-6; 35-1; 36-1 

Workers' Universities 10 11 

Work Laws, Compulsory * 9 6 

Workmen's Compensation Makes Gains. 23 9 
Workmen's Compensation — See "Court 

Decisions, Etc." 

"World Safe For Democracy." A (by 

lohn A. TTobson) 4 1 

Wrecks. — 

Albert 31 5 

Aryan 25-9; 29-5 

Avon 1 14 

Benito Juarez 14-10; 16-10 

Blackford 4-5; 11-5 

Bonheur 23 5 

Breakwater 12 5 

• Chaproi 22 14 

Chin Pu 41 14 

City of Mobile 40 14 

Cleopati a 26 5 

- Bay 4 5 

Cyclops 5-14; 27-9; 49-14 

Delia 15 5 

Dornfontein 7 14 

I )umaru 11 5 

Eastland (Same Old Story) * 11 6 

Fisherman 1 15 

Flirt 27 14 

( labriella 46 14 

George A. Loomis 19-5; 20-5; 27-5 

( rloaming 6 14 

Herald 18 14 

Jamt Carruthers 21-5; 26-5; 33 5 

Lake Erie 22 14 

Lake Weston 28 14 

I .om'se 29 5 

Mabel Davis 40 14 

Mandalay 9 5 

Mount Vernon 24 14 

Myolo 33 14 

Nanyo Maru 21 14 

Newburg 8 5 

Newport News 8 14 

Northumbria 21 14 

O. M. (lark 9 5 

Palos ■•... 10 14 

Pennsylvania 11 5 

Premier 38 5 

Princess Sophia 8-5; 19-5; 38-5 

Pronto 14 5 

Richard B. Silver 38 14 

Richard H. Buckley ' 48 14 

San Gabriel 6-5; 8-5 

San Jose 29-5; 33-5; 43-5 

Sehomc 15-10; 16-5: 19-5 

Star of Poland 9 5 

St. James 27 14 

Superior 23 5 

William Olson 39-5; 41-5 

Wrecks — See also "A Disastrous Year" 26 11 

Wrecks, Medieval Theory of 50 11 

X-Y-Z 

Yankee W balers, The 9 8 

Your "John Hancock" 49 9 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXXII, No. 1. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1918. 



Whole No. 2503. 



CASUALTIES O F WAR AND PEACE. 

The Lists of "Killed and Injured" in Industrial Pursuits. 



The casualty lists of war forcibly direct our 
attention to the sacrifices made by our own 
flesh and blood in behalf of human freedom. 
These lists drive home our losses largely be- 
cause they are aggregated and issued at certain 
intervals. 

The casualty lists of peace would bring home 
the horror of industry if they were issued in 
the same manner. 

Similaily, it' the easually lists of infantile 
mortality were issued in that way they would 
shock every reader with the tragedy contained 
in them. 

The trouble is that the deaths and injuries 
sustained in industry never are aggregated in 
the newspapers, other than once a year or 
once every few years, and then only in the form 
of dry statistics. 

In intensely industrial countries like America, 
England, France, Germany, etc., scores of thou- 
sands lose their lives in industry, while hun- 
dreds of thousands are injured, and scores of 
thousands of little children die — these latter 
largely because of the poverty of their parents. 

As Lady Warwick said early in the war, "It 
is more dangerous to be a child born in Eng- 
land than a soldier fighting in France." 

If our big dailies, for instance, were to issue 
a list on the lines indicated under headings, 
"Killed in Industry"; "Injured in Industry"; 
"Child Mortality" — once a month, the tens of 
thousands of names would fill page after page. 

John Mitchell's Patriotic Address. 

Thoughts along these lines doubtless actu- 
ated Mr. John Mitchell, for many years presi- 
dent of the United Mine Workers of America, 
to direct public attention to the casualties of 
peace in the following splendid address re- 
cently delivered at Brooklyn, N. Y.: 

"Wherever men meet during these days one 
thought, one hope is uppermost in their 
minds. The winning of the war, the destruc- 
tion of autocratic, militaristic systems of gov- 
ernment, the establishment of justice, the per- 
petuation of liberty and democracy among all 
peoples of the earth is the question of tran- 
scendent importance; and if I reflect the sen- 
timent and the determination of the wage- 
earning millions of our country the war will 
not end until the right of peoples to govern 
themselves is secured and guaranteed unmen- 
aced by military castes and unhampered by 
autocratic governments. If I diagnose correctly 
the attitude of the wage-working people of 
America there will be no peace until the Prus- 
sian vandal on bended knee supplicates the for- 
giveness of God and the mercy of man for 
the outrages he has perpetrated against civil- 
ization and mankind. 

"Each day the meaning, the significance of 
this world struggle becomes more clear. Each 
day the war is brought closer to our homes 
and our firesides. Each day more of our 
sons go forth to do battle in defense of justice 
and liberty. Each day service flags with their 
red border, white center, and blue stars appear 
in greater numbers. This flag is the emblem of 



service; and now, here and there, appears the 
silver star, the emblem of wounds sustained 
and suffering endured; and here and there the 
gold star, indicating that some of our boys 
have made the supreme sacrifice, that they 
have died that liberty may live. The love of 
life is strong and overpowering; the aged, the 
cripples, and the sick desire to live; yet there 
is nothing so sure and certain as death and 
if a man could elect the circumstances under 
which he should die who would not choose to 
die fighting foi liberty and for his country? 
Our Willing Sacrifices for Freedom. 

'While of course we hope and pray, and es- 
pecially do mothers hope and pray, that our 
sons may come home; yet it were a thousand 
times hetter that they should never return, 
that their life's blood should enrich the sacred 
soil of France than that the Prussian autocrat 
should be permitted to impose his will upon 
the free and democratically organized govern- 
ments of the world. 

"These are the thoughts and these are the 
purposes which animate and control all right- 
thinking, liberty-loving, unselfish, patriotic men 
and women of this our country. In this deter- 
mination and in this purpose we shall not falter. 
The heritage of liberty bequeathed to us will be 
handed down untarnished and unblemished to 
our posterity. 

"Moreover, while prosecuting the war for the 
establishment and maintenance of international 
peace, freedom and justice we shall continue in 
our determination to maintain industrial and 
social righteousness in our own country. So 
far as the solution of our internal and domestic 
problems will not retard the solution of the 
great world problem, the organized workers 
will persist in their efforts to protect the lives 
and to raise the standards of labor of all 
those engaged in industrial pursuits. We un- 
derstand that the victories of peace have their 
price in dead and maimed as well as do the 
victories of war. While the bread of the 
laborer is earned in the sweat of his brow it 
is eaten in the peril of his life. 

"Whether he work upon the sea, upon the 
earth, or in the mines underneath the earth 
the laborer constantly faces imminent death; 
and his danger increases with the progress of 
the age. Witli each new invention the number 
of killed and injured rises; each new speeding 
up of the mechanisms of industrial life; each 
increase in the number and size of our mighty 
engines brings with it fresh human sacrifices; 
each year the locomotive augments the num- 
ber of its victims; in each year is lengthened 
the roll of the men who enter the dark and 
dampness of the mine never again to return to 
their homes and loved ones. 

"Killed" in Peaceful Pursuits. 

"And many arc killed without violence; thou- 
sands of wage earners lose their lives in fac- 
tories, mills and mines without the inquest of a 
coroner. The slow death which comes from 
working in a vitiated atmosphere; from in- 
haling constantly the fine, sharp dust of metals, 
from working unceasingly in constrained and 
unnatural postures; from constant contact of 



the hands and lips with poisonous substances; 
lastly the death which comes from prolonged 
exposure to inclement weather, from over- 
exertion and under-nutrition, from lack of 
sleep, from lack of recuperation swells beyond 
computation the unnumbered victims of a rest- 
less progress. 

"It is, of course, inconceivable that the gi- 
gantic industrial movements of the American 
people should be conducted without some 
fatalities. The industrial structure is a huge 
machine, hard-running and with many unguarded 
parts and many of the fatalities, many of the 
deaths in general are simply and solely the 
result of conditions beyond human control and 
inseparable from the ordinary course of exist- 
ence. But thousands upon thousands of easily 
preventable accidents and fatalities occur each 
year, and it is from these that we should strive 
to secure relief. 

"In the State of New York alone last year 
approximately 300,000 wage earners were" in- 
jured, 60,000 of them so seriously as to disable 
them from working for more than fourteen 
days; approximately 1,500 wage earners were 
killed or fatally injured in the course of their 
employment. 

"The consummation of the movement for the 
disarmament of nations, the abolition of war, 
and the establishment of international peace re- 
quires the consent of all the great powers, 
whereas the abolition or the substantial diminu- 
tion of the suffering caused by industrial acci- 
dents requires action only on the part of the 
people of our own country. 

Prevention of Industrial Accidents. 

"In the discussion of this vitally important 
question — the prevention of industrial acci- 
dents — we sometimes hear a voice saying, 'What 
have I to do with this matter? Am' I my 
brother's keeper'? The answer is 'Yes'.' 
Emphatically and unqualifiedly Yes.' No man 
is quite fit to live in a civilized society who is 
not concerned for the welfare and happiness of 
his less fortunate fellow-man. A great philos- 
opher once said that a free man is one who 
lives in a country in which there are no slaves. 
Paraphrasing this statement, I contend that a 
really happy man is one who lives in a com- 
munity in which there is no avoidable misery. 

"It is to be regretted that here and there in 
the sacred name of patriotism, attempts have 
been made by selfish men to break down the 
labor standards which have been erected either 
by legislation or by trade union activity for 
the protection of wage earners. These attempts, 
thanks to the vigilance of the organized wage 
earners, and to the sympathetic support of 
other good men and women, have failed, and 
the necessity, even as a war measure, of main- 
taining the legislative safeguards for the pro- 
tection of labor has been recognized and pro- 
claimed by our great war President and by the 
war Governor of the Empire State. The Presi- 
dent, in vetoing an Act of Congress increasing 
the hours of labor of government employees 
said : 

"'At the outset of the war I felt it my duty 
to urge all employers in the United States to 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



make a special effort to sec to it that the con- 
ditions of labor were in no respect altered un- 
favorably to the laborers. It has been evident 
from the first how directly the strain of this 
war is to bear upon those who do the labor 
which underlies the whole process of mobilizing 
the nation, and it seemed to me at the outset, 
as it seems to me now, that it is of the highest 
importance that the advantages which have 
been accorded labor before the war began 
should not be subtracted from or abated.' 

"The Governor of New York, in vetoing an 
act of the Legislature which would have lowered 
the standards erected for the protection of 
labor, said: 

Sound Views of New York's Governor. 
" 'We must not permit our people who are 
< ngaged in industrial pursuits to become ap- 
prehensive that the standards erected for their 
protection will be set aside; and we must not 
permit our industrial population to have cause 
to feel that the war's burdens and sacrifices 
may rest most heavily upon the shoulders of 
those least able to bear them. To give cause 
for such an impression would be a grave error. 
We must do nothing that would impair the 
confidence or weaken the loyalty of the service 
of those who are engaged in the fields and 
the factories. We should not disregard the 
errors of other nations with respect to the 
suspension of their labor laws; on the con- 
trary, we should profit by their mistakes.' 

"Perhaps no one phase of trade union policy 
has been the subject of more adverse criti- 
cism than has the demand of the workers for 
lit hour day. Professional and business 
men. including manufacturers, fail to under- 
stand the logic of the workingman's demanding 
that his hours of labor shall be limited to eight 
each day while they themselves frequently work 
from ten to fourteen hours per day. Para- 
doxical as it may appear, one explanation is 
that the workingtnan earns more in eight hours 
than he does in ten, while the business and 
— ional man earns more in ten hours than 
lie does in eight. Every student of industrial 
affairs and everyone familiar with the rise and 
fall of wages will readily concede that wages 
have appreciated to a greater extent in those 
Hades in which the eight-hour day has been 
established than in trades having a longer work- 
day. 

"The critics of trade unionism allege that a 
reduction in the hours of labor means more 
time and more money spent in drinking and 
dissipation. This assertion, reiterated inces- 
santly, has been completely refuted by every- 
day experience and by the history of the labor 
movement. When the workingman comes from 
mine or mill, having taxed to the utmost his 
muscular and nervous energy, it is little wonder 
if he seeks a stimulus in alcohol or other crude 
pleasures. The unanimous testimony of all 
competent observers, teachers, ministers and 
sociologists, has been to the effect that a reduc- 
tion in the hours of labor invariably means an 
improvement in the whole moral tone of the 
community, a raising of the standard of living, 
a growth of the self-respect of the workingman, 
and a diminution not an increase in drunken- 
ness, violence and crime. If the American 
workman can be entrusted with the franchise, 
it is certainly safe to entrust him with a few 
hours of leisure time. 

"If trade unionism had rendered no other 
service to humanity, it would have justified its 
existence by its efforts in behalf of working 
women and children. Unfortunately, society 
not seem to feel itself capable of con- 
ducting its industries without the aid of its 
weaker members, and with each advance in pro- 
duction, with each increase in wealth and the 
capacity of producing wealth, women and chil- 
dren in ever larger numbers are drafted into 
service. In this development the woman, like 
the child, has been taken from her home and 
has been made subject to the tolling factory 
hell. The home, the natural and moral sphere 
of the woman, has been shattered by the in- 
vasion of the machine and the factory system. 
The burden of our civilization bears with 
heaviest weight upon the shoulders of women. 
Through constant association with it we have 
become hardened to the humiliating and de- 
grading fact that in our society as at present 
constituted, hundreds of thousands if not mil- 
lions of women and girls depending exclusively 
upon their own resources are compelled to work 
unduly long hours and for beggarly wages. 
Protecting Women and Children. 
"Were it not for the influence of trade union- 
ism the work that women and girls are com- 
pelled to do would prove even more demoral- 
izing than it is. The trade union seeks to pro- 
tect the woman, morally, physically and indus- 
trially. It demands that she shall not be em- 
ployed at night work or for very long hours; 
it demands and insists that women shall receive 
equal pay with nu n ¥ for equal work. In de- 
manding equal pay and healthful surroundings 
for women the union not only protects the 
woman and the home, but it also protects the 
standard of living of all wage earners. 

"Those who look only at the surface of things 
and judge trade unionism by an occasional 
glimpse are likely to underestimate the up- 
lifting influence of this institution upon the 
character of the wage earner. Many who admit 
that trade unions have been successful in 



shortening hours, and improving 
the material conditions of the worker's life, 
still believe that their effect upon his intel- 
lectual and moral tone has been either bad or 
entirely negative. To all, however, who do not 
view these matters superficially it must be evi- 
dent that trade unionism has had exactly the 
opposite effect. The increased wages and 
shortened hours of labor have in themselves 
lit about a vast improvement in the mental 
and moral status of the workers. Workmen who 
formerly went from their twelve hours of work 
to the nearest saloon now spend their time 
with their families, improving their minds and 
enjoying a sensible and sane recreation. In 
most instances increased wages and shorter 
hours have meant the gratification of the in- 
tellectual and artistic sense of the workers, 
have meant books and pictures; have meant a 
few additional rooms in the house and more 
decent surroundings generally; have meant a 
few years' extra schooling for the children; 
have meant, finally, a general uplifting of the 
whole working class. 

"Trade unionism distinctly raises the moral 
tone of the wage earners by infusing into 
them a sense of the dignity of labor. There 
is much lip service paid to the ennobling effect 
of labor and the dignity it confers upon the 
workman, but it is the trade union, more than 
any other institution, that translates these mere 
ions into actual deeds. The unionist 
feels that it is not the work itself but the 
spirit in which the work is accepted and per- 
formed that ennobles the worker. The prin- 
cipal clement that gives to labor its dignity is 
its voluntary character. There was nothing 
ennobling about the toil of the slave, crouching 
beneath the lash; there was nothing ennobling 
in the work of the serf, bowed down by the 
w light of centuries; there is little of the dignity 
of labor in the forced work of the convict or 
of the man toiling under the padrone system; 
there is, indeed, little dignity and nothing en- 
nobling in the work of any man whose earn- 
f today are absolutely necessary that he 
may live tomorrow. The greater the initiative 
and the more complete the independence of 
the worker, the greater the pleasure in his 
work and the more ennobling it becomes. 

"The great new fact of American labor is its 
organization. The workingman has joined with 
his fellow workman and has obtained as a 
right, not as a privilege, higher wages, shorter 
and better conditions of life and labor. 
Finally, through the trade agreement, he has 
secured the right to be consulted as to the con- 
ditions under which his work shall be per- 
formed. 

What Trade-Unionism Has Done. 

"In the pursuit of its ideals trade unionism 
has justified its existence by good works and 
high purposes. At one time viewed with sus- 
picion by workman and employer alike, it has 
gained the affection of the one and the en- 
ued esteem of the other. Slowly and 
gradually it has progressed toward the ful- 
fillment of its ideals. It has elevated the stand- 
ard of living of the American workman and 
d for him higher wages and more leisure. 
It has increased efficiency, diminished acci- 
dents; averted disease; kept the children at 
school; raised the moral tone of the factory, 
and improved the relations between employer 
and employed. In doing so it has stood upon 
the broad ground of justice and humanity. It 
has defended the weak against the strong, the 
exploited against the exploiter. It has stood for 
efficiency rather than cheapness, for the pro- 
ducer rather than production, for the man 
rather than the dollar. It has voiced the claims 
of the unborn as of the living and has stayed 
the hand of that ruthless, near-sighted profit 
seeking that would destroy future generations 
as men wantonly cut down forests. It has 
aided and educated the newly arrived immi- 
grant, protected the toil of women and chil- 
and fought the battles of the poor in 
attic, mine and sweatshop. It has conferred 
benefits, made sacrifices, and, unfortunately, 
committed errors. I do not conceal from myself 
that trade unionism has made its mistakes. No 
institution fully attains its ideal and men stumble 
and fall in their upward striving; but I submit 
to the judgment of every unselfish, impartial 
mind that the trade union, like every other 
institution, should be judged by the good it does, 
and I ask if there is a man so blind to the 
truth that he will not confess that the trade 
union movement has done much to elevate the 
men, women and children of labor and to pro- 
tect the great mass of the people who are 
least able to protect themselves. 

"The trade union movement is primarily 
and fundamentally a moral movement. While 
attention is attracted to it by its strikes and 
its struggles, yet the battles it fights in de- 
fense of the poor and the helpless are but 
phases of the greater movement that is making 
for the mental, the moral and the physical 
development of all our people." 



WHEN WILL THE WAR END? 



Injunctions against the boycott, being pow- 
erless to compel patronage of unfair concerns. 
will always be futile as long as the spirit of 
fair play exists among men and women. 



The war will end when the democratic 
nations of the world have broken the back- 
et' l'russianism and German autocracy, and it 
can not end until then. When the armies 
of the free nations have trampled under foot 
the militarism of Germany the war will end. 
Germany must he whipped, and when we 
say that it means also, Austria-Hungary and 
the rest of the nations who are lined up 
with Germany. The fact is that these na- 
tions are even now no more than subject 
colonies of Germany with German influence 
in absolute control. Therefore, the whole 
structure composing the central powers must 
be broken down and not one stone left upon 
another. 

The war will end when Germany has been 
compelled to make full and complete repara- 
tion for everything it has done to Belgium, 
l" Poland, to Roumania, to Serbia and to 
all the other small nations that have fallen 
under its military hoof. Germany must make 
reparation to France for all the destruction 
and misery, and the suffering that it has 
spread throughout that land. 

The German people — not the present gov- 
ernment — must be brought to a position 
where they can and will guarantee the fu- 
ture peace of the world, and the war will 
not end until this is done. The present im- 
perial German government has no place in 
this plan, because no people in the world 
now would be willing to accept or believe 
any promise it might make. 

And the United States is going to bring 
this about. The United States is to be the 
deciding factor that will settle for all time 
the question of whether autocracy or democ- 
racy shall predominate throughout the world. 

We entered tins wai fifteen months ago, 
and in that time gigantic things have been 
tplished. We have raised, equipped and 
sent to France more than one million sol- 
diers, trained and ready for service and sup- 
plied with everything they needed. Other 
millions will follow as fast as they can be 
transported. 

When the American troops began landing 
in France, the ports were crowded and jam- 
med, so that it was impossible to unload the 
transports without many days of delay. In 
one instance it is known that one American 
transport was compelled to remain outside 
a French harbor for nineteen days awaiting 
an opportunity to unload at a dock. This 
meant a loss of almost another round trip. 
But all of this has been changed. The 
Americans have built their own docks and 
wharves and their own warehouses. They 
have built hundreds of miles of double track 
railroad to transport these supplies from the 
ports to the troops in the field. They have 
taken 22,000 American freight cars and 1600 
American locomotives from this country to 
run on the American railroads of France. 
Recent figures given out at Washington show 
that 45,000 Americans are employed on 
American railroads there. And this is but 
one feature of the wonderful achievements 
of Americans in the fifteen months that we 
have been in this war. 

A nation that can do these things can do 
anything. It can break down the awful 
German military rule and make the world 
safe for democracy. That is exactly what 
America proposes to do, and when that is 
done, the war will end. — United Mine Work- 
ers' Journal. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Value of Publicity Known to Packers. 

That meat packers appreciate the value of 
publicity is shown by the quick manner Swift 
& Company issued a thirty-page pamphlet in 
which denial is made of the federal trade 
commission's claim that the packers have 
stifled competition and attempted to block 
investigation by the government. 

The commission stated that the interests 
of the "big five" packers — Swift, Wilson, 
and that they control subsidiaries interested 
and that they control subsidaries interested 
in public service, land development, stock 
yards, cattle loans, rendering, cotton oil, 
publications, terminal facilities, banks, pack- 
ers' machinery and supplies, cold storage and 
ware houses, slaughtering, railroads and 
canning. 

The packers are charged with being con- 
spirators and the commission says its in- 
vestigators have been met by schools for 
witnesses where packers' employes were 
coached,- letters were destroyed and returns 
demanded under the law falsified. 

"Some show of competition is staged by 
the five great packers," it is stated, "but that 
is superficial and unreal." 

Swift & Company enters a general denial 
of these charges, and the commission is 
blamed for resorting to "sensational meth- 
ods," "adroit construction" and omitting 
"scores of salient facts." 

It is evident that the commission's report 
hurts, and Swift & Company, who conduct a 
large newspaper campaign throughout the 
country, print extracts from many newspapers 
condemning the commission's attitude toward 
the packers, who assure the public they are 
tremendously injured. 

All of which is undoubtedly true. 



Women on Iron Work is Paying Project. 

The National Industrial Conference Board 
has been investigating the question of women 
in metal trades and finds that employers, as 
a rule, favor this plan from the standpoint 
of economy and do not consider the question 
in its broader significance. 

The board represents seventeen organiza- 
tions of employers, including such units as 
the National Association of Manufacturers, 
National Founders' Association, and the Na- 
tional Council for Industrial Defense. 

The board says that the opinion of manu- 
facturers is chiefly related to their factory 
experience. "Further evidence," says the 
board, "that the question was seldom con- 
sidered in its broader significance is fur- 
nished by the fact that forty-four employers 
replied merely 'yes' to the question regard- 
ing the desirability of the wider introduction 
of women, without further comment or dis- 
cussion." 

An exception to this rule was noted in the 
case of a firm employing 205 women. 

"The future of the race depends abso- 
lutely upon the moral strength of the women 
and if the employer of labor is not of the 
calibre that builds this moral strength, there 
is great danger in the employment of 
women." 

The board refers to this declaration as "a 
very conservative attitude." 

One employer of 500 women reports that 
women "are more open in accepting prices 



for piece work," and the board finds that 
although women workers talk more about 
what is unsatisfactory to them, "the main- 
tenance of permanent organizations by 
women has been exceptional." 



Anti-Union Employers Must Change Tactics. 

In his new book, "The Russian Upheaval," 
Prof. Edward A. Ross, former president of 
the American Sociological Society, makes 
this suggestion to anti-union employers: 

"The labor-fighting, labor-crushing policies 
which many employers' associations delight 
in are an anachronism, and those who per- 
sist in them should be tolerated about as long 
as smokers are tolerated in a powder fac- 
tory. The normal means by which workers 
protect themselves from exploitation is col- 
lective bargaining, which presupposes the 
union. 

"In the production of resentment it makes 
very little difference whether the working 
men are deprived of the right to organize 
by the government of a Czar or by employ- 
ers' associations. The economic effect is the 
same. 

"The ruthless 'hire and fire' practices of 
American industry should be replaced by 
decent methods considerate of the interests 
and feelings of the employes. Co-operation 
should be welcomed as the natural and reason- 
able thing. All the aspects of a business 
which concern labor should be considered 
and settled by joint boards in which employer 
and employe have equal representation. Means 
should be employed which will give wage 
earners an interest in the prosperity of the 
concern. Only by some such right-about- 
face on the part of American capitalists will 
it be possible to avert a calamitous class 
strife which will shatter the foundations of 
our national prosperity." 



Low Wage for Miners Reducing Man Power. 

At a meeting of officers of the United 
Mine Workers of America, district presi- 
dents and secretaries, Fuel Administrator 
Garfield refused the request of these workers 
for wage increases, and said that if the 
miners and coal operators agreed on wage 
increases he would veto it. 

The miners then prepared a statement of 
their position and forwarded same to the 
fuel administrator. 

"Again and again," say the miners, "we 
will come to you on behalf of the miners." 

Present mining conditions have been inten- 
sified by the fuel administrator's abolition of 
the bonus system. The miners are not favor- 
able to this system, but they show that their 
wages have been reduced, the cost of living 
has steadily increased, and "the prices of 
shoes, food, clothing, rent, etc., have gone 
higher and higher to a degree unforseen 
and unexpected when the present agreement 
was consummated." In the anthracite region, 
especially, thousands are not getting a wage 
sufficient to guarantee a decent living, it is 
stated. 

The anthracite district has lost 30,000 
miners through the draft, enlistments and 
by inducements offered in other industries. 

"Shall the present inefficient force be fur- 
ther depleted?" the miners ask. "The mine 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 

International Seamen's Union of America, 328- 
332 West Randolph St., Chicago, I1L 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 
Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes des France, 33 Rue Grange 
aux-Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord, 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fryboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundt, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten 1 B., Sweden. 
DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade IS, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhavn 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nationale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina IS, Austria. 

SPAIN. 

Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo des Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's Workers 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Thirty-si* per rent, of the em- 
ployes of the Government of Great 
Britain, outside tlic munition fac- 
tories, in January, 1918, were wo 
according to an announcement by 
the Department of Labor. It is esti- 
mated that in all lines of work 
1,442,000 women have stepped in to 
fill the depleted ranks of industry, 
and nearly three-quarters of this 
number work for the Government. 
Women street-ear conductors in 
London, England, refused recently to 
take out their cars until they had 
been granted a 5 shilling a week 
bonus which had been given the 
men but not the women. The wo 
secured the active support of the 
men conductors and drivers, who 
struck in sympathy. As a result of 
the tie-up. many munition workers 
and business men were unable to 
reach their places of employment. 

Arthur Henderson, Charles W. 
Rowerman, secretary of the British 
Trade Union Congress, and other 
members of the House of Commons 
recently applied for passports to 
Switzerland for a conference there 
with Pieter Troelstra, the Dutch So- 
cialist leader, regarding letters re- 
ceived from Socialists in enemy 
countries. The war cabinet, after 
discussing the request, decided that 
it was inadvisable to grant pass- 
ports enabling persons in Great 
Britain to meet persons abroad who 
have passed through enemy coun- 
tries. The Parliamentary Committee 
of the Trade Union Congress and 
the executive of the Labor party 
debated this refusal and passed a 
strong resolution of protest. 

It is becoming more and more 
difficult to obtain clothing in Bel- 
gium, according to the Belgian 
Bulletin, received by the Department 
of Labor, which says that persons 
who have been thrown out of work 
may secure on easy terms, once a 
year from the charity clothing club, 
a dress or an overcoat, A Belgian, 
interned in Holland, obtained per- 
mission to wear civilian dress. His 
wife, who had remained at Ver- 
viers, joined him, and he wrote re- 
cently: "My wife has come with 
my personal effects. However, before 
she left, a number of persons came 
to her and offered her for my 
Sunday suit and overcoat 500 francs 
($100); for a pair of velvet trous 
which cost 7 francs ($1.40) before 
the war, 40 francs ($8); for my 
shoes, 250 francs ($50); etc." 

Germany will have a serious labor 
problem in the days to follow the 
war, according to information which 
has readied the United States De- 
partment of Labor. Latest reports 
indicate that the number of unions 
has declined from 771 to 450 since 
1913, and that the membership of 
the Berlin Central Labor Union has 
fallen from 302,000 to 130,000 in the 
same time. Hamburg's 130,000 trade- 
union members in 1913 have been re- 
duced to 47. (Will now, and Dresden's 
membership of 96,000 has been cut 
in half. The great wastage of Ger- 
man man power in the war not only 
means a future danger but has led 
to widespread troubles in Belgium 
which, according to Lieut. Henry 
De Man, of the Belgian Army, who 
spoke before the Boston Central 
Labor Union, caused the greatest 
labor strike in the world. More 
than 1,000,000 organized laborers of 
Belgium, he said, refused to do any 
work for the Germans. 



M. BROWN & SONS 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



LIPPMAN'S 

Head to Foot Clothiers for Men 

Fourteen Years in San Pedro 

532 Beacon Street 

531 Front Street 

Two Entrances 



FRERICHS NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

529'/ 2 BEACON STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

Seafaring people who desire to take up navigation, San Pedro, situated In the sunny 
south Is the Ideal place. Captain Frerlchs has established a Navigation School here 
and under hi* undivided personal supervision students will be thoroughly prepared 
to pass successfully before the United States Steamboat Inspectors. 

TERMS ARE REASONABLE 



SATISFIED CUSTOMERS ARE OUR 
BEST ADVERTISERS 

S. G. SWANSON 

Established 1904 
For the BEST there Is In TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2d Floor, Bank of San Pedro, 110 W 6th St. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront, Cal. 



HAVE YOU SEEN IT? 

THE EQUITIST 

Published weekly by the 

Equitist League 

Longbranch, Wash. 

?l a year; 13 weeks 26c; siagli ;• 

Discusses tlic "bread ami butter question" 

from the standpoint of the worker 

• • • 

at, Judge James If, 
Savannah, Mo.; Vice-Pres., Kenneth B, 
Elllman, Boston, Mass.: Treasurer, Her- 
Cohn, Seattle, Wash.; Secretary, w. 
E. Brokaw, Longbranch, Wash. 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 



1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



You Want the Truth 

This year there will be stirring times 
in the Nation. Under government cen- 
sorship it is increasingly difficult for 
the average man to get the real mean- 
ing of the social and political move- 
ments of the day. 

LA FOLLETTE'S 
MAGAZINE 

will be specially represented at Wash- 
ington and will analyze and present the 
news from the capital truthfully and 
fairly. Senator La Follette is making a 
real fight to lift some of the tax bur- 
dens from the common people and place 
them where they belong — on excess 
profits, war profits and surplus fortunes 
and incomes. Because of this he Is be- 
ing attacked more bitterly than any 
other mfn in publio life. 

Send In your order today. 

$1.00 Per Year— Agents Wanted 

La Follette's Magazine, Madison, Wis. 



NOTICE. 

Masters, Mates and Pilots' 
Association of the Pacific has 
opened a branch office at 529^ 
Beacon St., San Pedro, Cal. ; Capt. 
H. C. Frerichs, Agent. 



SAVE 
MONEY 

AND YOU 

SAVE LIVES 

BUY 



WS.S. 

WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 

JSSUED BY THB 

UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention The Sea- 
men's Journal. 



Tacoma Letter List. 

Bertelsen, Bertel Marx, Thorwald B. 

Carlson, Joe Meyer. Karl 

Carlstrand, Gustaf Nielsen, Niels -751 

Ellegaard, M. Olsen, Slgvald 

Hansen, Gotfred Palken, G. 
Holmstrom. Carl A. Seyf ried, M. -2962 

Houge, Anton Sorenson, Sam 

Krane, I. Swansen, Carl 
Martinsson. B . 



WORKERS UNION 



UNIOWreTAK* 

Factory 



Named Shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



The Anglo- California Trust Company 

As successors to the SWEDISH-AMERICAN BANK 
offers a particularly convenient service to 

SEA FARING MEN and to the SCANDINAVIAN PEOPLE 

in California 

ANGLO-CALIFORNIA TRUST CO. 

Main Office: Northeast Cor. MARKET and SANSOME STREETS 

BRANCHES: 

16th and Mission Streets Fillmore and Geary Streets 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS.. $ 1,910,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 16,000,000 

COMMERCIAL SAVINGS TRUST 



San Pedro Letter List 

Anderson, Chester Laurltjen, Ole 

Anderson, Andres Lechemus, BUI 

Andresen, Hans Lill, Karl 

Aalto, Harry Larson, Gust. 

Andree. E. -1410 Maloney, Jack 

Anderson, Otto K. Mutka, Anton 

Anderson, C. L. Muda. Gust 

Anderson. Whltle Moller, Karl R. 

Aalto. K. A. -1341 Miller. John 

Brelen, Han* Monterra, John 

Berg, John Morrison, Philip 

B. p. -IMS Metz. John 

Brant, Max Moberg, Karl G. 

Beler, John C. Nilsen. Nils E. 

Brown, G. Nordllng, Frank 

Benson, W. F. Nlssen. Carl 

Clay, Henry N'urml, Talni 

Cariera, P. Norris, W. J. 

I •olllns, Ed. Nelson. C. R. 

Carlson, R. C. Norstrom, Hans 

1 'ahlman, C. H. Nelson, Hans 

Drasbeck, Karl Nanta, A. A. Hendrlk 

Erickson, Chas. Olsen, Olo \V. 

Emmerz, Joe Olsen, Thorllef 

Knit. Anton Olsson. Fred 

Eklund, Swen Olsen, Andrew 

Folvig, Ludvlg Pederson, Carl 

Folvig, John Pettersson. T. -1734 

Fosberg, Leonard Pitkin, V. 

Fulger, M. J. Persson, B. S. -754 

CJundersen, Fred Peterson, K. E. -903 

Gougat, F. Pederson. 

Grassen, Joe Peterson, Hugo 

Gronlund, O. -414 Paterson. C. V. 

Galleberg, Martin Rhode. Carl De 

Gundersen. C. A. Roed, HJalmar 

Gunerud. Thorvald Rudt, Walter 

Gustavesen, Karl Ronald. Peter 

tolmstrom. Fritz Rivera, John 

loversen, Carl Rajala, Victor 
.Tolmstrom, HJalmar Rohl, Chas. 

Horlln, Ernest Rohe. Chas. 

lansen, Adolph Raaum, Harry 

Irmsen, Aksel Raun, Einar 

lartog. John Stratton, Ross M. 

loek, A. Svensson. Nikolaus 

•ledman, John M. Shlleman. F. 

.rmv, Fred Sandberg. N. A. 

.Tohansen. Fritz Stringer, E. 
.Tohnnnson.N.A. -1604Sanders, Chas. -1077 

.Johnson. Ole Shep, Pete 

Johnson. Chas. A. Seppel, P. 

-2044Sehroede.r, Alfred 

Johanson, Anton Terkkl, Arthur 

-2230Tahtlnen. Hj. 

Jnnnssen, Johannes Thompson, Alex 

.lohnsen. H. Tllltrom. Chas. 

Johnson, Carol H. Thirup, C. 

Koff. Michael Veckenstedt. W. 

Kopatz, Oscar Westergaard. L. 

Kruger, G. -JS4 'Williams, Edward A. 

Karl son. Olav Wlchman, C. H. 

T.indaulst. R. Warkala, John 

T,etohford, A. Zunderer. Theo 



Portland, Or., Letter List 



Anderson, Martin 

Anderson, Albert 

Albertsen, Peter 

Anderson. C. 
ii. Franz 

Brandt, Arvid 

Cariera, Peter 

Carlson, Carl G. 

Danielsen, Eric 

Dahl, Ludwig J. 

F.lliot. Austin E. 

Eriksen, C. 

Guildersen, W. E. 

Guthrie, V. A. 

Geiger, Joe 

Harding, Ellis 

Hartman. Fritz 

Henricksen, Chris- 
tian G. 

Hauscbild, B. 
rt, Bill 

Halligan, Thomas 

Hofoker, Fritz 

Johansson, Charles 
-2407 

Johnson, Karl 

.Torgenson, Earl 

Jensen, H. T. 

Tohansen, Johan 

Johnson, Emll P. 

Johnson. Jonas 

Jakobsson, K. J. W. 

Rase, A. 

Kaskinen, Albert 

Krlstensen, Wm. 

Kellv, Wm. 

Knofsky, E. W. 

Knutsen, Ragnwald 

Kristiansen, Wll- 
helm A. 



Laatzen, Hugo 
Larsen, Hans 
Leens, E. 
Miller. Harry 
Mikkelsen. Harry 
Mattsen. S. H. 
Nurm, John A. 
Nogat, E. G. 
Nelson, A. 8. 
Nelson, Harry 
Nelson, Fritz 
Ogilvie, Wm. A. 
Olson, J. W. 
Olson, Samuel 
Powell. H. A. 
Paulsson, Herman 
Peterson, S. 
Palm, P. A. 
Petersen, Anton 

-1675 
Peterson, Fredrik H. 
Peterson, Gust. 
Rensmand, Robert 
Itulsgaard, Soren 
Rlchter, N. 
Siebert, Gust 
Sarri, O. 
Swenson, C. E. 
Rvenson, Anton 
Samuelsen. S. 
Stysman, Emll 
Tuhkanen, Johan J, 
Thoresen, Ingwald 
Thompson, Andrew 
Westengren, C. W. 
Warren, Geo. 
Willing, Wm. 
Yllnen, S. V. 
Wold, Frank 



CUT THIS OUT! 

and send it with 25c and receive by re- 
turn mail Regular Dollar Size Package 
of our Famotl Egyptian Beauty Cream, 

CREMONILE 
A Beautv Builder of Highest Order. 
Yn i will be moie than delighted with 
the result. __ 

S. J. CHURCHILL CHEMICAL CO., 
Beaumont, Texas 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



Concessions have been made by the Govern- 
ment in the interest of having foreign vessels 
carry fish from Alaska to coast ports. 

It is estimated that it will cost half a million 
dollars to repair the Osaka Shosen Kaisha 
steamship "Canada Mam," which came so near 
destruction on the Cape Flattery rocks. 

Eighteen of the forty wooden vessels buill and 
building by the Foundation Company at Port- 
land and Tacoma have been chartered by the 
Thorndyke-Trenholme Co., managing agents of 
the French owners, to various concerns. 

The Monticello Steamship Company has pur- 
chased the twin-screw steel steamer "Asbury 
Park" at a reputed cost of $200,000 to add to 
its fleet of San Francisco-Vallejo vessels. The 
ship will be brought from New York at once 
through the Panama Canal. It will be the 
largest and fastest steamer on the bay. 

Representatives of the Emergency Fleet Cor- 
poration to promote good relations between 
workers and employers in shipbuilding districts 
were announced during the week. They include: 
II. A. Brotherton, of San Francisco, for Cali- 
fornia yards, and Henry W. McBride, ex-Gov- 
ernor of Washington State, for all Washington 
yards. 

The first unit of the new five-unit dry dock 
built at Port Blakeley for the Skinner & Eddy 
Corporation has been delivered at that plant. 
The unit is 90 by 125 feet. The completed dock, 
with its live units, will be 400 feet long by IS 
wide. It will be capable of lifting 17,000 dead- 
weight tons. The fifth unit is expected to be 
delivered in November. 

The Pope Shipbuilding Corporation, Eos 
Angeles, has been incorporated with a capital 
of $1,000,000 to construct and operate a plant 
near Newport Beach. It is negotiating a lease 
covering about thirty acres of waterfront prop- 
erty, and plans to build both steel and wood 
vessels. E. D. S. Pope, Frank Scovillc and Wil- 
liam M. Loftus, Eos Angeles, are the incor- 
porators. 

A new departure in Seattle shipbuilding activi- 
ties was the completion recently of a 500-ton 
concrete scow by the Inter-Ocean Barge & 
Transportation Company, The craft lias been 
chartered to the Border Line Transportation 
Company, for service between Seattle and Brit- 
ish Columbia ports. Returning from her maiden 
trip, she carried 1060 measurement tons of box 
shooks. 

C. F. Alexander, president of the Pacific 
Steamship Company, has been notified that he 
has been named by the American Steamship 
Association to serve on a special committee 
named by that organization to prepare views 
on the possible means of utilizing and operating 
the 3000 steamers which will be at the disposal 
of the Shipping Board at the conclusion of the 
war. Alexander has accepted the appointment. 

Eleven new lights were established in Alaska 
bv the Bureau of Lighthouses since June 30, 
1917, according to an announcement by Secre- 
tary Redlield. Three lights were changed from 
fixed to flashing, and one gas buoy, twelve 
buoys of other types, and five beacons were 
established. Before the present season is over 
sixteen additional new lights will be established, 
as well as two new gas and bell buoys and an 
unlighted daymark. 

Close to 6000 employes of the Mare Island 
(Cal.) Navy Yard participated in a big celebra- 
tion on September 4 in honor of the completion 
of the champion destroyer "Ward." The parade 
started at 8:30 o'clock. Lieutenant W. T. Mc- 
Nifif, U. S N., was grand marshal. Speeches 
were made by the naval officers and by local 
city officials. A street fiance was held later. 
The "Ward" was completed in 108 days, the 
fastest built man-of-war in the world. 

The job of floating the steamer "Afghan 
Prince," ashore on Gabarus Shoal, Cape Breton, 
has been given to the Maritime Wrecking & 
Salvage Co. of Halifax. Superintendent Rcid is 
now at the scene of operations. If the weather 
continues good Captain Reid has good hopes of 
floating the big freighter. A quantity of tobacco 
and alcohol from the ship's cargo has been 
landed at Louisburg by naval patrol boats and 
shipped to the Furness-Withy agency at Sydney. 
The timber scaled in British Columbia during 
the first six months of 1918 totaled 772.446.607 
feet, [n 1917 the scale reached 662,407,441 feet 
for the first six months, compared witha total 
"of 509,383,498 feet of the same period of 1916. 
This is an increase over 1916 of over 50 per 
cent. Considering the scarcity of skilled woods 
labor this showing is a remarkable showing. 
The lumber cut for the province in 1917 was 
approximately 1,600.000,000 feet. 

Wooden ship builders of Portland have or- 
ganized the Oregon Wood Ship Builders' A 
a.tion, for the purpose of restoring the merchant 
marine of the country and to promote the 
wooden ship industry in the Northwest. Officers 
elected were: President, E. C. Knapp, Peninsula 
Shipbuilding Company, Portland: vice-president, 
F. W. Wright, McEachern Shipbuilding I on 
nanv. Astoria; secretary, George E. Low. Supple- 
Ballin Company, Portland; treasurer, Erick V. 
Hauscr, Grant Smith-Porter Ship ' Company 
Portland. 



Another 12,000-ton steel freighter will be 
launched at the Alameda (Cal.) plant of the 
Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation about the 
middle of September. The exact date for the 
launching has not been set, though efforts will 
be made to have the event take place Sunday, 
September 15. Kirby S. Heckt, harbor engineer 
for the city of Oakland, is preparing an exhibit 
for the land show, which will show in detail 
Oakland's big water front from the tidal canal 
down the estuary and around the Key Route 
basin to Emeryville. 

During the month of August twenty-four ves- 
sels and two rafts laden with lumber and logs 
from the Eower Columbia River plants sailed 
for California, and their combined cargoes 
amounted to 29,050,000 feet. Two vessels carry- 
ing 1,747,926 feet sailed for foreign ports. In 
the same period seven vessels loaded 3,358,256 
feet at the upriver plants, making a grand 
total of 34,156,182 feet of lumber and logs which 
left the Columbia River in cargoes and rafts 
during August. In addition to this, 583,358 
shingles were shipped from Astoria to Hono- 
lulu. 

Captain Donald S. Ames, assistant inspector 
of hulls and boilers at San Francisco, has 
been appointed local inspector of hulls and 
boilers for the port of Seattle, to succeed Cap- 
tain William Fisher, who has been appointed 
supervising inspector of the Eleventh District, 
which comprises Washington and Alaska, ac- 
cording to a communication by Captain John K. 
Bulger, supervising inspector for the First Dis- 
trict. Captain Bulger has recommended that 
Fred W. Richardson, assistant local inspector 
of hulls and boilers at Boston, be transferred to 
San Francisco to succeed Captain Ames, and 
has recommended that Captain T. J. Sullivan, 
assistant local inspector of hulls anil boilers at 
New Orleans, be transferred to San Francisco to 
succeed Captain Arthur P. Gilbert, who was 
commissioned Lieutenant Commander in the 
naval auxiliary. 

Eight salmon canning companies in British 
Columbia have consolidated under the name 
of the Northern B. C. Fisheries, Limited, capi- 
talized at $2,000,000. The concerns that have 
been merged are tin- Draney Fisheries. Limited, 
Nfamu; Kimsquit Fisheries, Limited, Kimsquit; 
Tallheo Fisheries, Limited, Bella Coola; Skeena 
River Commercial Company, Limited, Port Es- 
sington; Port Edward Fisheries, Limited, Port 
Edward; Kincolith Fisheries, Limited, Mill Bay: 
Portland Fisheries. Limited. Kumeon; the Namu 
Box Company, Namu. The purpose of this 
amalgamation is primarily to stabilize the earn- 
ings of the various companies involved. It fre- 
quently happens that a cannery at one spot 
has a very lean season, and a cannery at an- 
other spot equally strategically situated has a 
very profitable season. By those interested in 
the constituent companies pooling their interests 
they are reasonably assured of constant divi- 
dends, provided a poor season does not obtain 
throughout the entire northern district. 

As a means of relieving the pressure upon 
Eastern coal, the United States Fuel Adminis- 
tration has arranged a test of State of Washing- 
ton coal in Chilean industrial plants. Trial 
cargoes were recently shipped from Puget Sound 
to Chile. The coal cargoes were accompanied 
by fuel experts wdio will conduct the experi- 
ments. Hertofore the coal for Chile has been 
taken from the mines of West Virginia, Penn- 
sylvania, and Maryland, which mines are now 
carrying the heaviest burden in producing coal 
for Government uses. It is estimated they are 
14,000,000 tons behind the production required 
from them to meet the war demands. To rem- 
edy the shortage of coal in Argentina, ship- 
ments are now being made from South Africa. 
The prejudice against South African coal in 
Argentina, caused by the poor quality of ship- 
ments sent a few years ago, has now been over- 
come and South African coal shippers hope soon 
to obtain a contract for the Argentine Navy, 
though, as yet, freight rates to and from Ameri- 
can ports, when transports are available, oper- 
ate against shipping centers in the Cape Prov- 
ince and Natal. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone, Sutter 
5807. (Advt.) 



SILAS B. AXTELL, attorney for the Eastern 
& Gulf Sailors' Assn., Marine Cooks & Stewards' 
Association, Marine Firemen, Oilers & Water 
Tenders' Union, has moved his offices to the 
ground floor of the Washington Building, One 
Broadway, New York. Entrance room J, ground 
floor. Consultation and advice on all matters 
relating to enforcement of the Seamen's Act, 
claims for Compensation or damages, will be 
given free of charge as in the past, by Mr. 
Axtell and his expert assistants, Mr. Vernon S- 
Jones and Mr. Arthur Lavcnburg. (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' 

FEDERATION. 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS: 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary 

1%A Lewis Street 

Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md ADOLF KILE, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 
NEW YORK CITY....GUSTAVE H. BROWN, Agent 

51 South Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa... OSCAR CHRISTIANSEN, Agt. 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT, Va S. ALEXANDERSON, Agent 

123 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala CHARLES RAVING, Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La. .. .CHARLES HANSON, Agent 

400% Fulton Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex GEO. SCHROEDER, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I CHAS. CLAUSEN, Agent 

27 Wickenden Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y 12 South Street 

H. P. GRIFFIN, President 

W. L. CARTLEDGE, Secretary-Treasurer 

Telephone Bowling Greeri 8840-8841 

New York Branch D. E. GRANGE, Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 

Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass...: J. A. MARTIN, Agent 

6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS. La R. T. KAIZER, Agent 

228 Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK, Va WM. QUINN, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS WM. J. SIGGERS Agent 

127 Twenty-third Street 

BALTIMORE, Md A. KILE, Sub. Agent 

802-804 South Broadway 

PHILADELPHIA. Pa..O. CHRISTIANSEN, Sub. Agt 

206 Moravian Street 

MOBILE, Ala C. RAVING. Sub. Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex...G. SCHROEDER, Sub. Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex J. CLAUSEN, Sub. Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 40 Burling Slip 

Telephone John 396 
New York Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 164 Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN, N. Y 110 Hamilton Avenue 

Branches: 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa 138 South Second Street 

BALTIMORE, Md 802 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va 127 Twenty-third Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex 132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex 221 20th Street 

BOSTON, Mass 196 Commercial Street 

NORFOLK, Va 513 East Main Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La 400V 2 Fulton Street 

MOBILE, Ala 104 S. Commerce Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. 1 27 Wickenden Street 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 

Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Agency: 
GLOUCESTER, Mass 163 Main Street 



LAKE DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, 111 324-332 West Randolph Street 

Telephone Franklin 278 
Branches and Agencies: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone Hanover 240. 

ASHTABULA, 85 Bridge Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 44 Shelby Street 

Telephone Cherry 342. 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, III 9214 Harbor Avenue 

rOLEDO, 821 Summit Street 

(Continued on Page 11.) 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



The Seamen's Journal 

Published weekly at San Francisco 
BT THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRBNBERG Editor 

S. A. SILVER Business Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - - $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
59 Clay Street, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1918. 



SUCCESS TO THE CHIEF! 



Mr. John II. Rosseter, recently appointed 
1 Hreetor of Operations of the U. S. Emer- 
gency Fleet Corporation, left his home 
town, San Francisco, during the past week 
for Washington, D. C, to tackle one of 
the biggest jobs ever assigned to a mere 
man. 

In brief, Mr. Rosseter's job is to make 
it possible for our great new merchant 
fleet to continue in full operation when 
peace has finally been declared and when 
the great maritime nations of the world 
will resume the old struggle for commer- 
cial supremacy upon the seas. 

Before leaving Mr. Rosseter made it per- 
fectly clear that he is not in sympathy with 
the minority group of Americans who have 
always maintained that success in ocean- 
carrying competition can be had only by 
employing "cheap" labor. 

In an address at a banquet tendered in 
his honor by the San Francisco Chamber 
of Commerce, and again in an informal talk 
before the Waterfront Workers' Federation 
of San Francisco, Mr. Rosseter laid em- 
phasis upon the fact that he would not, if 
it were in his power to do so, lower the 
wage or the prevailing standard of living 
ol" American seamen. In addition, the new 
Director of Operations left no doubt re- 
garding his attitude toward Chinese crews. 
He told the merchants in the Palace Hotel 
and the workers in the Labor Temple ex- 
actly the same story. He is opposed to 
the employment of Chinese seamen on 
American ships and confidently believes 
that competitive odds in this respect can 
be met and overcome by American system 
and efficiency. 

Mr. Rosseter believes our greatest com- 
petitors will be Great Britain, Japan, and 
the Scandinavian countries. His general 
attitude is that it will doubtless require 
much hard work (principally "pull together 
work") to meet and solve this tremendous 
task before the American people, but he 
is full of real optimism as to ultimate re- 
sults. He thinks it can be done. And his 
whole life's work in the shipping business 



should be a guarantee that he is "the man" 
to do it. 

In the performance of his duty Mr. Ros- 
seter will have the loyal, hearty and active 
co-operation of the organized American 
seamen. Whatever can be done by the 
International Seamen's Union of America 
to restore the Stars and Stripes to its right- 
ful place will be gladly and willingly done. 
And it will be a genuine pleasure to work 
toward the goal with such a man as Mr. 
Rosseter. 

American ships — manned by American 
crews — visiting all the ports of the world 
and sailing every corner of the seven seas 
employed in profitable trade, that is the 
common goal. Is it not worth striving for 
by us all? Is it not, next to winning the 
war, a great and splendid object for all 
Americans? 

Yes, indeed, it is an aim worthy of a 
great nation. It is a task in which red- 
blooded men can enthuse. And, finallv, it 
is work that "must" be done — for the fu- 
ture welfare of our Republic demands it! 

Here's success to Jack Rosseter, the San 
Francisco boy, who has been called upon 
to do it. 



TRAINING MERCHANT SEAMEN. 



The Shipping Board, through Edward N. 
Hurley, Chairman, has authorized the com- 
missioning of a training-ship on the Great 
Lakes, for the training of apprentices as 
seamen, firemen and cooks on Lake cargo 
carriers. The ship will be based at the 
station to be established at Cleveland, under 
the direction of Captain Irving L. Evans, of 
Cleveland, Section Chief of the Board's re- 
cruiting service for the Lakes. 

This service, of which Henry Howard, of 
Boston, is director, is now training 3,000 
men a month for the new merchant marine, 
on a fleet of training vessels maintained in 
Atlantic and Pacific waters. The Lakes ves- 
sel will be the thirteenth in the Board's 
training fleet. 

The training of men by the Government 
for service on the Great Lakes is a novelty. 
It was ordered by the Shipping Board, 
through Chairman Hurley, as one means of 
meeting demands of the organized sailors, 
firemen, oilers and watertenders who had 
voted to strike for patriotic reasons in order 
to compel the Steel Trust-controlled Lake 
Carriers' Association to co-operate with the 
Government. m 

Recruiting of apprentices for the Great 
Lakes training ship will be carried on in the 
same recruiting stations of the Board that 
are now providing large numbers of young 
men for coastwise and overseas ships. The 
Board has nearly 2,000 of these stations in 
the seven Stations touching the Lakes. 

It is certainly a most gratifying record 
that there has been splendid and close co- 
operation between the International Seamen's 
Union of America and the U. S. Shipping 
Board's Recruiting Service from the very 
outset. 

Conferences have been held from time to 
time and the threshing out of many prob- 
lems has always cleared the way for a still 
better working arrangement between the 
Recruiting Service and the various District 
Unions. 

The issuance of the historic Call to the 
Sea by the organized seamen has helped 
materially to bring about desired results. 

That young America is fully alive to the 
"Call of the Sea" is forciblv demonstrated 



by a jump of more than 50 per cent, in 
recruiting for the merchant marine during 
one week. The latest weekly report from 
the recruiting service of the Board shows 
that in the seven days following the an- 
nouncement of the acceptance of men for 
the merchant service outside the former draft 
age, the number of apprentices on the Ship- 
ping Board's training ships rose from 3.125 
to 4,846. The training station at Seattle, 
which has two cruising ships, showed a phe- 
nomenal gain. The San Francisco station, 
which has only one recruiting ship, showed 
an increase from 561 to 681. Boston, base 
of the Atlantic training squadron, which 
has three erasing ships, showed an increase 
from 2,178 men to 2,366. 



STOPPING THE ENGINES. 



The British Board of Trade has issued 
a notice to shipowners pointing out the 
importance of being able to stop engines 
of a vessel when a casualty has occurred. 
The notice calls attention to the fact that 
cases have occurred, when vessels had 
been torpedoed and in immediate danger 
of sinking, in which, either through an 
escape of steam in the engine- and boiler- 
rooms or through the flooding of the 
engine-room, it has been impossible to 
stop the engines. As a result there has 
been needless loss of life because, owing 
to the speed with which the vessel was 
moving through the water, the ship's 
boats could not be launched or, if launched, 
were capsized on reaching the water. It is 
pointed out, therefore, that means be pro- 
vided in all steamships of stopping the 
engines from the deck or the engine-room 
skylight hatchway. The Board of Trade 
suggests that this can be done readily in 
any of the following ways: 

1, By connecting a wire rope to the throttle 
valve lever (or lever on the governor spindle 
in some cases') and leading it to a point in or 
near the engine-room skylight hatchway, from 
which position the lever can be operated and 
the throttle valve shut, the rope normally being 
slack to admit of the free movement of the 
lever in maneuvering the engines; 

2, By a simple arrangement of rods and wheel 
connected to the engine stop valve of each main 
engine for shutting this valve from the position 
d< scribed in (1) ; or 

3, Where there are few boilers, by fitting rods 
from the boiler stop valves to the top of the 
boiler casing, with suitable hand wheels for 
closing those valves from that position. 

The Board of Trade strongly urges that 
one of the above means of stopping the 
engines be provided at the earliest oppor- 
tunity. Care should be taken that the ar- 
rangement is such as not to interfere with 
the necessary maneuvering of the engines 
as may at any time be required at sea. The 
gear should be well tried after being fitted, 
in order to see that it fulfils its purpose 
effectively; and, if hand wheels are used 
for closing the valves, they should be so 
marked as to show how the valves are 
opened and shut. 

Cases have also occurred where a ship 
has been torpedoed or mined at the for- 
ward end, and, in consequence, has trimmed 
so deeply by the head that the propeller or 
propellers have been almost clear of the 
water and have continued revolving while 
the boats were being launched. This has 
in some cases caused the destruction of 
some of the boats with loss of life. Before 
the engine-room is abandoned in such 
cases, it is important that the steam be 
entirely shut off the engines, the circulat- 
ing and air pumps stopped (if separate 
from the main engines'), and every effort 



iMiwuuum 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



made to destroy the vacuum in the con- 
densers, and thus to prevent, as far as 
possible, any further movement of the 
propellers. A simple and inexpensive de- 
vice for destroying the vacuum would be 
an air inlet cock or valve on the condenser 
which might be made to be operated from 
below and from the same position as the 
emergency steam controlling gear. 



THE FOURTH LIBERTY LOAN. 



The campaign for the Fourth Liberty Loan 
will begin September 28 and close October 
19. The result of the loan will be watched 
with keen interest in Europe, not only by our 
associates in the war against the Teutonic 
powers but by our enemies. It will be re- 
garded by them as a measure of the Amer- 
ican people's support of the war. 

The Germans know full well the tremen- 
dous weight and significance of popular sup- 
port of the war, of the people at home back- 
ing up the Army in the field. As the loan 
succeeds our enemies will sorrow; as it falls 
short they will rejoice. Every dollar sub- 
scribed will help and encourage the American 
soldiers and hurt and depress the enemies of 
America. 

The loan will be a test of the loyalty and 
willingness of the people of the United 
States to make sacrifices compared with the 
willingness of our soldiers to do their part. 
There must be and will be no failure by the 
people to measure up to the courage and de- 
votion of our men in Europe. Many of them 
have given up their lives ; shall we at home 
withhold our money? Shall we spare our 
dollars while they spare not their very lives? 



THE PROPS OF AUTOCRACY. 



An idea of the work of the entente allied 
navies in European waters is shown by 
figures on the part taken by American des- 
troyers from one base in April, May and 
June of this year. These destroyers, which 
form only a part of America's fleet in Eu- 
ropean waters, escorted 121 troopship con- 
voys, consisting of 773 ships, in that pe- 
riod. During the same time they escorted 
171 merchant convoys, consisting of 1763 
ships. When it is considered that the 
American Navy in that period did only 
27 per cent, of the convoying and that the 
figures represent only the work of destroy- 
ers at one base, it may be seen what a 
tremendous task is being performed by the 
allied navies. There are at present 155 
ships flying the British flag cairying Amer- 
ican troops exclusively. In August more 
than 250,000 American troops arrived in 
Europe. Of this number the American 
Navy convoyed 34, the British navy 65 and 
the French 1 per cent. Permission to pub- 
lish the foregoing facts and figures has just 
been received. 



Seamen between the ages of 18 and 45 
should bear in mind that Thursday, Septem- 
ber 12, is National Registration Day. All, 
including natives, naturalized citizens and 
aliens, are required to register. Seamen 
arriving in port after this date must register 
upon arrival. If in doubt regarding your 
duties in this respect call at the office of 
your Union and secure reliable information. 



You can't teach a "new" trade unionist 
old tricks. He insists upon learning in his 
own way and at the cost of his own bumps. 



Professor Jordan Excoriates "Kultur" and says 

"Every German Privilege Rests on 

Royal Favor." 



Become a stockholder in the United 
States — buy war-savings stamps. 



"Every German privilege rests on royal favor, 
and by royal veto it can at any time be taken 
away," says Professor David Starr Jordan, of 
Leland Stanford University, California, in "A 
Letter to Americans of German Origin," which 
is published in The Public. 

The writer says he has not a single German 
ancestor, but he has given lectures in Germany 
in behalf of democracy, "and in what I thought 
and hoped was the German language." 

"This experience showed me," he says, "that 
the spirit of '48 was still alive in Southern 
Germany, at least, and ready to burst forth 
when the time should come. 

"The tireless researches of German science," 
he continues, "and patient docility of German 
society have given the theory and practice of 
absolutism, or 'monarchical order,' a hold it 
never had in England or in France. 

"But no German-American can have any real 
love for the Prussian dynastic machinery. He 
may feel a deep personal sympathy for his 
cousins who are forced to suffer or die to 
support it. Such sympathy is most natural and 
honorable. But the need for it is part of the 
tragedy itself. Those friends of his have fallen 
at the dictate of absolutism and for the main- 
tenance of an unscrupulous dynasty. 

"This war once started has gained in motive 
as well as in momentum. Its final end must 
rid the world of the menace of aggressive 
dynastic militarism. 

"The Prussians have killed war. They have 
made it too wicked for human comprehension. 
They have set aside all other gods to worship 
at the shrine of military necessity. 

"Let us consider certain definite facts: Prus- 
sia has virtually swallowed the rest of Germany. 
Austria has become her vassal, Turkey her hired 
tool and Bulgaria a more or less unwilling ac- 
complice. Prussia is organized as no other 
State has ever been before for repression at 
home and aggression abroad. Prussia knows no 
right or wrong. She is at the mercy of an 
aristocratic-military-plutocratic clique, of which 
the Kaiser is at once the agent and the victim, 
lie is the leader only when he leads along the 
way they have marked out for him. 

"This clique brought on the war. The authors 
of the Serbian ultimatum were in the plot and 
the deed was consummated in the hurricane of 
lies. One of the most absurd of these fables 
was that the war was the work of King Edward 
VII (of England), through whose machinations 
innocent Germany has been surrounded by a 
ring of iron. The real truth, as you know, is 
that Germany, since 1871, has been organized as 
a war machine, and the mind of the nation 
has been perverted and poisoned by cheap 
visions of military glory, with a golden shower 
of indemnities to boot. 

"The system of subservience known as kultur 
pointed directly towards expansion by conquest. 
Kultur, or monarchial order, is a system of 
discipline enforced from above. It means com- 
plete military as well as industrial regimenta- 
tion, and complete subordination of the in- 
dividual to the dynasty and the State. It is 
ruinous to individual development, destructive 
to initiative, and it plays into the hands of 
the privileged classes generally, whose serfs are 
the people. To these, relative security without 
hope is granted in place of freedom and ini- 
tiative. 

"There never was an autocratic court which 
was not corrupt to the core. There could never 
be one, for its very essence consists in exer- 
cising a power the people never delegated, by 
men they have never commissioned. Under 
such a rule, in the different States of Germany, 
the mases have no rights. Every privilege rests 
on royal favor and by royal veto it can at any 
time be taken away. 

"Moreover, the watchword of 'monarchial 
order' is perfection. Every institution, army, 
church, school, university, society is perfect 
from the start. 'The State can do no wrong.' 
It is thus immune from crimes or blunders. 
Perfection, however, is the perpetual enemy of 
progress. The perfect State is stalled in the 
bogs of the Middle Ages. Democracy means 
progress, and no real progress is possible until 
the obsession of perfection is dissipated. 

"Democracy knows nothing of perfection. It 
has no finished products. It is a 'going con- 
cern,' deserving better things because ever mov- 
ing towards them. Democracy does not mean 
good government — only better government. Tt 
is the gateway to freedom and justice, the gate- 
way only — but there is no other. And justice 
means the control of one's own career, the op- 
portunity to make the most of life for one- 
self and for society. The ideal of autocracy, or 
of the State-worship which it uses as a blind, is 
the opposite of this. A man, they say, is but 
'a brick in the wall of an edifice, he does not 
see and cannot understand.' 

"The waste of talent under the German sys- 
tem is as notable as 1 lie high specialization of 
the chosen few. 

''To be a soldier, pay taxes and keep his 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 3, 1918. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., Frank Johnson presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping good. 
Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 10, 1918. 

Monday, Sept. 9, being Admission Day, the 
regular weekly meeting was therefore postponed 
to Tuesday, Sept. 10. A synopsis of the minutes 
of the said meeting will be published in next 
week's isue. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, 

Secretary pro tern. 

Maritime Hall Bldg., 59 Clay Street. Tel. 
Kearny 2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. 3, 1918. 
No meeting. Shipping slow; men scarce. 

J. ETCHELLS, Agent. 
Room 11, de Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 



St. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 3, 1918. 
Shipping fair. 

WM. HARDY, Agent. 
58 Powell Street E. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. 
Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 3. 1918. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects fair. • 

II. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 3, 1918. 
Shipping good. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 3, 1918. 
No meeting. Shipping fair; members scarce. 

ED. ROSENBERG, Agent. 
P. (). Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 3, 1918. 
Shipping fair; members scarce. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
88^ Third Street. Tel. Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 3, 1918. 
Shipping good; members scarce. 

HARRY OHLSON, Agent. 
128^ Scpulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Aug. 26, 1918. 
No meeting. Shipping dull. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headqflarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 5, 1918. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping good. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 
42 Market Street. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Aug. 29, 1918. 
No meeting. Shipping fair. 

J. MEADE, Agent pro tern. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203. Phone Main 
2233. P. O. Box 214. 



According to advices received from Honolulu, 
the United States Shipping Board has decided 
to carry the sugar crop to the mainland in 
steel ships and utilize wooden ships for the 
transportation of the pineapple crop. It is esti- 
mated that there will be about 100,000 tons of 
canned pines, and as all of the wooden ships are 
small carriers it will require a considerable fleet 
to bring the pines across. It is announced that 
600,000 cases of these pines have been taken 
over by the Government for military use. All 
of the crop will have to be moved within five 
months, but from present indications it is ex- 
pected that this will be accomplished. The 
island interests have agreed that all of the 
steel ships are to be given full cargoes of sugar, 
and that there will be no delay in the loading. 
If necessary, huge fleets of lighters will have to 
be employed at Hilo and other places, where 
the loading is done offshore. Recently a Danish 
motorship arrived at a Pacific port with 8000 
tons of sugar. 



Captain A. F. Pillsbury, district superintendent 
of the Emergency Fleet Corporation at San 
Francisco, announced that there would be no 
more multiple launchings at the local ship- 
yards in the future. Each vessel will be launched 
as soon as it is ready to take to the water and 
the keel of another laid, ft has been learned 
that there is a waste of time and efficiency 
when several vessels are launched simultaneous- 
ly, and in order (o keep a yard going with 
efficiency, the multiple scheme has been done 
away with. The new method will not be so 
1 spectacular, but the results will be better. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



OUR WASHINGTON LETTER. 

(By Laurence Todd.) 



To-day's biggest piece of news, in the 
labor world, is the order issued by Director 
General McAdoo to all officers and em- 
ployes in the Railroad Service of the Uni- 
ted States, that they are removed from 
further active participation in politics. Two 
million men art' notified that henceforth 
they arc neither to run for office — except 
for local school or park boards — or to man- 
age the campaign of others, nor take part 
in any political convention, nor belong to 
any political committee, or solicit or re- 
ceive Funds, or contribute to funds collected 
by anyone in the Railroad Service, for any 
political purpose. 

The order deprives the 2,000,000 railroad 
workers, as well as the railroad lawyers, of 
these particular political rights of ordinary 
citizens, because, in the words of the Di- 
rector General, "Under Government control 
there is no inducement to officers and em- 
ployes to engage in politics, (hi the con- 
trary, they owe a high duty to the public 
• scrupulously to abstain therefrom." And 
also "This policy is intended to secure to 
all of them (officers, attorneys ami em- 
ployes) freedom of action in the exercise of 
their individual rights, and, at the same 
time, to prevent any form of hurtful or 
pernicious political activity.'' 

The same rule, substantially, was im- 
posed by the Civil Service Act, many years 
ago, upon all persons in the Federal civil 
service. At that time the country had been 
scandalized by the manner in which the 
political gangs in Philadelphia had forced 
the Government employes to contribute 
regularly to the Republican campaign fund. 
collected in Government buildings by Gov- 
ernment employes. There were in the en- 
tire country only 200,000 to 300,000 per- 
sons in the Federal civil service, ami pub- 
lic opinion was in hearty sympathy with 
the act of Congress which denied to this 
small body of public employes the right to 
take part in organized politics, or to run 
for political office. 

As the number of civil servants has in- 
creased, however, the question of safe- 
guarding the political rights of these men 
and women has come up again. The taking 
of the railroads by the Government as a 
Avar measure was the signal for new debate 
on the matter, and it was generally felt 
that no administration would attempt to 
put the railroad employes under civil serv- 
ice restrictions; on the contrary, the em- 
ployes themselves were confident, and the 
public seemed to understand, that the 
2,000,000 men in railroad work would be 
active in politics both for their own in- 
terests as wage-workers and for the cause 
of permanent public ownership of the rail- 
roads. 

"The approaching Federal and State elec- 
tions," the Director General says, "in- 
cluding the primary contests connected 
therewith, make it both timely and neces- 
sary that the attitude of the Director Gen- 
eral towards political activity on the part 
of officers and employes in the railroad 
service should be clearly stated. 

"It was a matter of common report that 
railroads under private control were fre- 
quently used for partisan political pur- 
poses; that railroad corporations were fre 
quently adjuncts of political machines, and 
that even sovereign States had been at 



times dominated by them. Contributions to 
campaign funds and the skillful and effect- 
ive coercion of employes were some of the 
means by which it was believed that many 
railroads exerted their power and influence 
in politics. Scandals resulted from such 
practices, the public interest was preju- 
diced, and hostility to railroad manage- 
ment was engendered. 

"Now that the Government controls and 
operates the railroads, there is no selfish 
or private interest to serve, and the in- 
centive to political activity on the part of 
the railroads no longer exists. 

"ft is therefore announced as a definite 
policy of the United States Railroad Ad- 
ministration that no officer, attorney, or 
employe shall 

"1. Hold a position as a member or 
officer of any political committee or or- 
ganization that solicits funds for political 
purposes. 

"2. Be a delegate to or chairman or 
officer of any political convention. 

"3. Solicit or receive funds for any po- 
litical purpose or contribute to any political 
fund collected by an official or employe of 
any railroad or any official or employe of 
the United States or of any State. 

"4. Assume the conduct of any political 
campaign. 

"5. Attempt to coerce or intimidate an- 
other officer or employe in the exercise of 
his right of suffrage. Violation of this will 
result in immediate dismissal from the 
service. 

"6. Become a candidate for any political 
office. Membership on a local school or 
nark board will not be construed as a poli- 
tical office. Those desiring to run for politi- 
cal office or to manage a political campaign 
must immediately sever their connection 
with the United States Railroad Service. 

"I am sure that T can count on the loyal 
co-operation of all officers, attorneys and 
employes engaged in the operation of the 
railroads under Federal control, to carry- 
out in letter and spirit the policy here an- 
nounced. . . . Let us demonstrate to the 
American people that under Federal con- 
trol, railroad officers, attorneys and em- 
ployes cannot he made a part of any political 
machine nor be used for any organized 
partisan or selfish purpose. 

"Let us set such a high standard of pub- 
lic duty and service that it will be worthy 
of general emulation." 

To this argument there are some officials 
of the railroad brotherhoods and the or- 
ganized shopmen who enter a most respect- 
ful but firm reply that the Director General 
has made a mistake: they say that there are 
a large number of their men already nominated, 
or running in the primaries, for Congress 
and for State legislative positions, and that 
these men cannot be deprived of the rights 
enjoyed, for example, by dollar-a-year or 
salaried men in the Food Administration, 
the Fuel Administration or the Shipping 
Board. At least, they feel sure that Mr. 
.McAdoo, upon further consideration, will 
modify his order so as not to bring any 
actual discrimination against one group of 
workers. 

Every one understands why the order 
was issued. Political opponents of Mr. 
McAdoo have charged that he was going to 
make the Railroad Administration a huge 
political army for the winning of the Presi- 
dential campaign in 1920, and he wants to 
discredit that storv. At the same time he 



is understood to be most anxious that Un- 
political power used in the past and still 
secretly used by large numbers of railroad 
officials, in behalf of corporate interests, and 
against public ownership or operation of 
the railroads, shall be destroyed. 

All the trade union leaders agree with 
him on these points. They point out, how- 
ever, that by denying to all railroad em- 
ployes, as well as to railroad lawyers and 
cifticials, the right to engage in politics, he 
is simply wiping out the biggest political 
support of public ownership, while he does 
not for a moment stop the corporate in- 
terests from putting up their own tools for 
election to Congress or to State offices. 
Most of the corporation lawyers will serve 
them in that way. 

Since the order is issued, the unions of 
railroad employes will have to do what the 
postal employes have done— select political 
candidates from among their salaried union 
officials. Representative Van Dyke of Min- 
nesota, for example, was separated from the 
railway mail service before he came to 
Congress. There have been dozens of cx- 
postmastcrs in the House in recent years, 
of course, although these have not repre- 
sented postal employes' unions. 

But this railroad order raises a bigger 
question: Will the Postmaster General 
order that the army of half a million tele- 
phone and telegraph employes obey the 
same rule?" And will orders be issued, 
presently, covering in the same way the 
war workers in Government plants? If 
this is to be the case, then a very large part 
of the organized labor of the United States, 
and a very small part of the political 
lawyers and heelers in the country, will be 
deprived of the right to run for office or to 
take part in campaign activities. 

Possibly some compromise will be 
reached, whereby political candidates and 
campaign managers may be given leave of 
absence without pay for a period of 
months, but may return to tin- service 
without loss of seniority rights. 
* * * 

At the moment when the 60,000 workers 

in sixty-six war industries plants in Bridge- 
port were preparing to nominate and elect 
their shop committees and their local 
hoard of industrial appeals, as provided 
in the plan of industrial democracy laid 
down in the award that was rendered last 
week by Otto M. Pidlitz, referee for the 
War Labor Board, some 3000 machinists 
have gone on strike. If the strike con- 
tinues, most of the plants will be tied up. 
Local as well as international officers of 
the Machinists' Union have tried in vain 
to stop the strike movement. The local 
business agent, who begged the men to 
stay at work, was dismissed. The griev- 
ance is the failure of the award to give 
the men the four wage classifications they 
wanted. It establishes a sliding scale of 
wage increases based on open shop wages 
that have hitherto prevailed. Men getting 
40 cents an hour will get 46 cents; men 
who got 41 cents will get 47 cents, and so 
on. Those who got 7? to 77 cents will get 
7X cents an hour. The men refuse to con- 
tinue to be paid by this method. 

Yet the award provides a sure and 
reasonably prompt method by which they 
could secure the change to four wage rates 
without any stoppage of production. In 
every shop the workers were to elect a 
committee, and also to nominate delegates 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



9 



to a general convention of Bridgeport war 
industries. This convention is to name 
candidates to be voted upon at a general 
industrial election for the Bridgeport war 
workers. This election will be held in 
booths in school houses. Three workers 
will be elected, to sit on the permanent 
board of local appeals. Before this board, 
which will include three employers and a 
chairman chosen by the Secretary of War 
and representing the Government, all dis- 
putes not settled between the shop com- 
mittees and the shop management will be 
heard. Under certain conditions an appeal 
may be taken from the local board to the 
National War Labor Board. Besides shop 
committees and the local board, the work- 
ers will have a general committee made up 
of all the sixty-six shop committees, which 
will act as the central labor legislature for 
Bridgeport war industries. With this ma- 
chinery at hand, the strike seems to War 
Labor Board officials to be particularly un- 
fortunate. 



AN ANALYSIS OF PENSIONS. 



An interesting analysis of the situation as 
regards employes' pensions is given by John 
A. Fitch, of the Survey staff, in a recent 
issue of that paper. To stop the excessive 
turnover among employes, and to hold their 
good will, many big firms have instituted sys- 
tems of pensions, based upon various condi- 
tions, and worked out in various ways. Some, 
like the United States Steel Corporation, have 
provided that the monthly pension is to equal 
1 per cent, of the average regular monthly 
pay received during the last ten years of 
service, multiplied by the years of service. 
Thus, "an employe who has been 25 years 
in the service and has received an average 
regular monthly pay of $60 a month will 
receive a pension allowance of 25 per cent, 
of $60, or $15 a month." This plan is com- 
mon among the larger railroads, and with 
slight modifications is used by a number of 
corporations. 

A more ambitious plan is that of Sears, 
Roebuck & Co., the Chicago mail-order house. 
This requires a payment on the part of the 
employe who wishes to participate into an 
employes' saving and profit sharing fund, to 
which the company agrees to add each year 
a sum equal to 5 per cent, of its net earn- 
ings. It had been estimated that the com- 
pany would pay into the fund $1.91 for each 
dollar paid by the employe. Instead, the 
profits have warranted the payment of $3.09 
for every dollar paid by the employes. Thus, 
the employe who began paying into the fund 
$12.50 a month in July, 1916, when the plan 
was started, had to his credit in December 
$306.75. At the end of 1917 his share of 
the fund amounted to $943.66. That is, he 
had contributed $225 in 18 months, and the 
company had added $718.66. The employe 
must be three years in the employ of the 
company before he can participate in this 
plan, he may withdraw his contributions with 
5 per cent, interest at any time, and can 
take out the whole amount after 10 years. 
Under plans like that of the Steel Corpora- 
tion the employe must serve 25 years and be 
60 years old before he can draw a pension. 
The pension ceases when he dies. Some com- 
panies pay a part of the pension to his widow 
and children under 16. 

Vet, regardless of the plans and results, 
organized labor is skeptical and resentful. 
Mr. Fitch quotes one union publication as 



saying: 'All of such schemes (the workers) 
are wont to look upon as merely on paper, 
and most of them they know to be designed 
to break up their organizations and make 
them as nearly as can be part of the running 
machinery of the various industries." An 
inkling of the reason for this comment ap- 
pears in a quotation from another union 
paper : "Twenty years of continuous, faith- 
ful service are demanded by most pension- 
advertising corporations before a worker is 
entitled to a certain monthly or weekly al- 
lowance. Twenty years, during which time 
the slave must always be humble, never 
grumble, do everything demanded, never 
think of trying to better his conditions, be 
always satisfied, and never, never join his 
fellows in an organization for the purpose 
of enforcing demands he individually cannot 
obtain. And this is the kernel contained in 
the sugar-coated pension pill." 

But the case against the industrial pension 
is even stronger than put by the union trade 
journal, as Mr. Fitch proceeds to show. For 
not only must the beneficiary surrender many 
cherished rights and privileges that distin- 
guish the free man from the serf, but even 
that abasement and humiliation does not nec- 
essarily assure the pension. The companies 
retain the right to discharge the employe, 
and to abandon the system. Added to these 
hazards is the possibility of insolvency on the 
part of the company. Whatever may be the 
merits of these plans therefore, and however 
good the impulse that has brought them into 
being, they clearly are not compatible with 
that freedom of individuality and self-asser- 
tion that must have play if progress is to 
continue. Nothing has been better proven 
by experience than that concessions granted 
as a favor, when they should be accorded as 
a right, tend to create resentment on the part 
of those who receive and contempt on the 
part of those who give. 

A pension worthy of the name, and com- 
patible with self-respect on the part of the 
recipient must attach to the person, and not 
to the office or place occupied by the indi- 
vidual, and it should be absolutely free from 
dictatorial powers of the agency paying the 
pension. No one should have to forfeit his 
right to move about or change his condition 
in order to retain this insurance. All such 
plans will prevent the turnover of labor only 
as long as opportunities for employment are 
scarce. When the number of workers ex- 
ceed the number of jobs a pension will be 
an additional inducement for the employe 
to remain where he is, but it will be at the 
cost of his self-respect. He will cast off the 
tie at the first opportunity ; and meanwhile 
there will be rebellion in his soul. 

The best that can be said for these private 
pension systems is that they tend to amelio- 
rate conditions while a new order based upon 
fundamental principles is being established. 
It is not likely that many of the men who 
have been foremost among those who have 
worked out and established pension systems 
had any other thought than to benefit their 
employes. It is a mistake to charge un- 
worthy motives to all whose actions result 
in evil. Ignorance is too general to warrant 
such a conclusion. It is a wrong economic 
condition that has made what appear to be 
tyrants and ingrates, but what are in reality 
victims of outraged nature. 

The ill will and discontent in the indus- 
trial world are due not to cvil-mindedncss, 
but to unnatural conditions that have been 
brought about by unjust laws. Co-operation 



is the natural order. Since two men work- 
ing together can produce more than twice as 
much as either working alone, it is to their 
mutual advantage to co-operate. And if 
both be free they will divide the gain satis- 
factorily. If, however, restraints be laid 
upon either, or upon both, the gain through 
co-operation is not likely to be shared equi- 
tably; and even though the division be fair, 
if it be made by one without the equal say 
of the other, there would still be discontent 
and unrest. In short, though employes want 
shorter hours, higher wages, and better con- 
ditions, they want first of all to be men and 
women. 

It must be evident, therefore, that all such 
schemes as private insurance, profit sharing 
and industrial pensions will fail of their pur- 
pose because they savor of charity on the 
part of employers, and impose subserviency 
on the part of employes. All attempts to 
solve the problem along this line are doomed 
to failure because they are contrary to the 
instincts of human nature. Pensions, usin<r 
the term in the sense of a gift by master to 
servant, have no place in a free society. But 
pensions, meaning insurance against want in 
sickness or old age, must be on the broad 
basis of citizenship, and must be accompanied 
by no thought of servility, obligation, or limi- 
tation of individual freedom. These condi- 
tions indicate government insurance, or an 
agency with the depth, breadth, and imper- 
sonality of government. — The Public. 



Labors Economic Platform 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor dis- 
putes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight 
hours per day on all Federal, State or municipal 
work, and not less than the prevailing per diem 
wage rate of the class of employment in the 
vicinity where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man-suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or 
compartments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
:.s will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain. 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 

workers will not remain if they are not paid 
a decent living wage." 

It is stated that there are 60,000 members 
of the United Mine Workers in the military 
service. In the coming months 14,000,000 
tons of coal a week will be needed, and even 
with an adequate car supply it will he al- 
most impossible to meet this requirement. 



An Officious Official. 

Roadmaster Boland of the Iowa and Da- 
kota division of the Chicago, Milwaukee & 
St. Paul railroad does not bother about living 
wage declarations by the National War Labor 
Hoard, whose principles have been promul- 
gated by the president. 

Mr. Boland is monarch of all he surveys, 
and to prove he is "it," he has issued this 
statement to track employes: 

"It has been called to my notice that a 
demand (or a request they call it) for an 
increase of wages is being made through the 
trackmen's organization, and I do not think 
many of you are cognizant of it. You all 
know I opposed this organization from its 
inception and told you of some of my rea- 
sons, but you organized, and the upshot of it 
is a demand (or request as you phrase it) 
on your Uncle Sam when he has his hands 
tied. Prussian organization trying to get his 
life blood. Do you call yourself patriots 
when von do this? You are not." 



Senator Thomas Alarmed. 

While defending his conscription-of-labor 
amendment to the draft law United States 
Senator Thomas expressed the fear "that 
the heads of organized labor, or many of 
them, propose to take advantage of war con- 
ditions to clinch the hold of organized labor 
upon the country." 

The Senator, of course, did not include all 
organized labor, which permits of future 
alibis. 

Senator Thomas represents Colorado, 
wherein is located Mr. Rockefeller's Colorado 
Fuel & Iron Company, a corporation that 
strangled every political and industrial power 
in that State four years ago, to defeat its 
organized mine employes. Strike guards 
were arrayed in the uniform of the State 
militia and their long record of killings cul- 
minated at Ludlow, when a tent colony main- 
tained by the strikers was swept by a rain 
of bullets and nearly two score of men, 
women and children killed. 



Non-Essential Work Defined in Capital. 

The District of Columbia community labor 
board of the United States employment ser- 
vice has suggested a list of non-essential 
labor. While this list applies only to the 
nation's capital, and may be enlarged, it is 
believed it will serve as a guide for local 
boards elsewhere. 

The following industries and callings are 
referred to as non-essential: 

Auto industry accessories; drivers of 
pleasure cars — cleaning, repairing and de- 
livery of same; sight-seeing cars, auto trucks 
engaged in work other than fuel or govern- 
ment work ; teaming other than delivery of 
products for war work ; bath and barber 
shop attendant^; bowling alleys, billiard and 
pool rooms ; bottlers and bottle supplies, 
candy manufacturers, cigars and tobacco, 
cleaners and dyers, clubs, confectioners and 
delicatessen establishments, builders and con 
tractors not engaged in the erection of struc- 



tures for war work, dancing academies, mer- 
cantile stores, florists, fruit stands, junk deal- 
ers, livery and sales stables, pawn brokers, 
peanut venders and establishments, shoe 
shining shops, window cleaners, soft drink 
establishments, soda fountain supplies. 

The board was guided in these decisions 
by this general policy of the Department of 
Labor: 

"For the purposes of the centralization of 
war labor recruiting program, 'war work' 
means : 

"1. The manufacture of products or the 
erection of structures directly or indirectly 
supplied to some department of the govern- 
ment for use in connection with the war. 
'Indirectly supplied' includes goods delivered 
under sub-contracts to Government con- 
tractors. 

"2. Coal mining is wholly war work. 

"3. Railroads and farms are engaged in 
war work to the extent that under this pro- 
gram they are protected from all recruiting 
by other industries. 

"4. The making of products which may 
ultimately be used for war purposes, but 
which are not to be delivered either directly 
to the government or to some contractor who 
uses them in producing or as a part of prod- 
ucts to be delivered to the government, is 
not considered war work." 



NEW LABOR LAWS OF 1918. 



THE PROPS OF AUTOCRACY. 

(Continued from Page 7.) 



mouth shut,' is the cordial duty of the common 
man as the ruling caste conceives it. In a de- 
mocracy a man may have to be a soldier at 
times — he will pay his taxes, of course, he lias 
levied them himself, but he will not keep his 
mouth shut. He is an equal partner in the great 
corporation of the republic; its future depends 
on his wisdom and that of his fellows and 
nothing else. 

'Every autocracy rests on three legs — force, 
intrigue and superstition. Without a great army 
it could neither enforce subservience at home 
nor threaten its neighbors abroad. One or the 
other must occupy its energies. To hold its 
own people it needs the menace of impending 
foreign war, always the 'swift remedy' for in- 
ternal unrest. 

"With the German people as such, President 
Wilson has said, we have no direct quarrel. 
The German form of government we would not 
oppose if the German people who sleep under 
it are permanently satisfied, and above all, if it 
bore no menace to the rest of the world. But 
when it assumes the role of brigand and bucca- 
neer, outraging its neighbors and betraying its 
friends, we have the right and the duty to 
oppose it in whatever fashion we may. 

"The only alternative to absolutism is found 
in democratic control. Tt matters not what 
have been the failures of democracy in the past. 
They represent the unsteady steps of a child 
learning to walk. Every people which finds 
freedom must pass through its kindergarten 
stages. Erance has had her turn. Russia is 
now in the primary class with Mexico and 
China, and Germany — when her iron bands are 
broken — may not escape the same infantile clis- 
orders. Monarchial rule gives no help towards 
permanent government. 

"Nor are we concerned with the past crimes 
or stupidities of Britain's imperialism in the 
long past of European history. The causes 
which now operate in Germany have had the 
same results elsewhere. The tyrannies from 
which Erance has forced her way to the light 
are familiar to all and need not detain us. The 
precedents of Louis XIV and the two Napoleons 
lend no justification to imperial Germany. St. 
Helena and Sedan loom large in their history, 
and Wilhelm IT feast in far smaller mold than 
cither Napoleon) — 'may profit by their ex- 
ample'." 



Some day our injunction judges will wake 
up and find the whole world in revolt against 
their assumption of superiority to all law, 
natural as well as statutory. 



The union label on any product is a guar- 
antee that the money paid for it will return 
to the consumer, with interest, in the form 
of improved social surroundings. 



Labor standards in war time have con- 
tinued to advance in spite of scattering 
attempts to suspend measures for the pro- 
tection of the industrial army, and gains 
through legislation have been greatly aug- 
mented by Presidential orders under au- 
thority of Congress to meet the national 
emergency, according to the summary of 
labor laws enacted during 1918 in a score 
of States and in Congress, just issued by 
tin- American Association for Labor Leg- 
islation. 

"Protective labor legislation, won through 
long years of effort, has proved a sound 
basis upon which to maintain and increase 
the efficiency and sustained fitness of in- 
dustrial workers," says the Secretary, Dr. 
John P>. Andrews. "Recognizing this, the 
Federal government and the States have al- 
most unanimously insisted upon upholding, 
enforcing and extending labor laws. Vir- 
ginia is the latest recruit in the workmen's 
compensation camp, making forty-one 
States and territories now having this form 
of social insurance, in addition to the 
model act of the Federal government for 
its million civilian employes, and the Sol- 
diers and Sailors' Insurance Act, the most 
important social insurance measure adopted 
by any country. With the experience be- 
fore them of the belligerent countries in 
Europe, which have, in the midst of war, 
greatly extended the benefits of their social 
insurance systems, official commissions in 
eight States have continued their investiga- 
tions of universal health insurance, called 
by Surgeon General Rupert l'duc the next 
big step in American labor legislation. The 
Supreme Court's adverse child' labor de- 
cision was a temporary setback, but the 
individual States continue to throw pro- 
tection around the employment of chil- 
dren. Several States, notably New York, 
have this year regulated women's hours 
and conditions of work and have improved 
safety and health safeguards. Nine States 
have enacted compulsory work laws as 
war-aid measures. Of far reaching national 
import is the passage by Congress of the 
law providing for the rehabilitation and 
re-education of crippled soldiers and sailors 
and their restoration to self-sustaining in- 
dustrial pursuits. Following this lead, 
Massachusetts has provided for similar re- 
habilitation of crippled victims of indus- 
trial injuries. Likewise significant are the 
creation by Executive order of the War 
Labor Board to improve industrial rela- 
tions, the War Labor Policies Board to 
establish proper standards of wages, hours 
and working conditions as well as housing 
of workers, and the expansion of the Fed- 
eral Employment Service to meet the 
urgent need of intelligent placement of 
labor." 

Social Insurance. 
Emphasizing anew the inroads made by 
workmen's compensation in the "solid 
South," with North Dakota the only North- 
ern State remaining without such pro- 
tection, a workmen's compensation law- 
was enacted this year in Virginia. In sev- 
eral additional States existing compensa 

lion laws were amended, the changes 
marking a continued tendency to extend 
the scope, shorten the waiting period, and 
increase the benefits. Kentucky extended 
her law to cover all employers of three or 
more persons and cut the waiting period 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



from two weeks to seven days. Louisiana 
found it necessary to penalize employers 
for deducting the cost of insurance from 
employes' wages and created a commission 
to report and plan for other forms of social 
insurance and State insurance for public 
buildings. Porto Rico, with an exclusive 
State insurance fund, and New York, with 
a competitive State fund, have found it 
possible to liberalize their laws, while 
Massachusetts has slightly increased her 
minimum benefit. The movement for uni- 
versal workmen's health insurance, to protect 
wage earners and their families against the 
hazards of sickness as workmen's com- 
pensation now safeguards them when in- 
jured, has continued to gain in impetus, 
with official commissions in eight States at 
work preparing the way for legislation. 
Safety and Health. 
Three States passed bills further re- 
stricting employment of children. New 
Jersey and Virginia strengthened their 
child labor laws, extending the scope and 
nature of employment affected, modifying 
working hours and raising age limits. 
Maryland raised from 12 to 14 years the 
minimum age at which children may be 
employed during vacations or may work 
in canning or packing establishments. New 
York forbids females under 21 from work- 
ing in telegraph and messenger employ- 
ments. Rhode Island has made unlawful 
the use of the "kiss of death" suction 
shuttle in textile mills. 

Hours and Wages. 
New York provided that no woman cm- 
ployed as messenger may work more than 
54 hours a week, or before 7 a. m. or after 
10 p. m. Virginia restricted the work day 
for women in factories, laundries and mer- 
cantile establishments to ten hours. Em- 
ployers arc forbidden by a Massachusetts 
law from collecting any gratuity given to 
employes for checking clothing. This State 
also made it unlawful for employers to 
deduct from the wages of an employe, be- 
cause of tardiness, any sum larger than 
that part of his wages which would have 
been earned during the time actually lost. 
Trade Disputes. 
Laws to curb "criminal syndicalism" and 
sabotage were enacted in Arizona, Mon- 
tana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South 
Dakota, in addition to similar measures 
adopted by Idaho and Minnesota last year. 
Ignoring the I. W. W. definition "con- 
scientious withdrawal of efficiency," these 
laws define sabotage as the violent and 
malicious destruction of property as a 
means of affecting economic, industrial or 
political ends or hindering war prepara- 
tions. Heavy penalties are imposed. Mon- 
tana, moreover, petitions Congress to form- 
ulate a Federal definition of sabotage. 
Administration of Labor Laws. 
Efficiency in the administration of labor 
laws is a matter of increasing concern. 
New Jersey created a workmen's compen- 
sation bureau to have exclusive original 
jurisdiction over all claims. Kentucky 
abolished the district system of adminis- 
tering compensation. Massachusetts 
ordered an investigation of the State Board 
of Labor and Industries. Porto Rico re- 
organized her compensation commission on 
a representative basis. 

Employment Service. 
Meeting an urgent need created by the 
movement of colored workers into North- 
ern States, a New Jersey law establishes a 



migrant welfare and employment bureau 
to investigate living conditions among mi- 
grants, instruct them in sanitary living, 
endeavor to procure proper housing facili- 
ties, and to obtain suitable employment ; 
and New York appropriated $5,000 to 
create an additional employment office "to 
best serve the interests of the Negro popu- 
lation." Strict regulation and gradual 
elimination of commercial private employ- 
ment agencies is furthered in New Jersey 
by the imposition of heavy license fees 
and bonds. Montana urges Congress to 
provide for labor placement on a perma- 
nent adequate basis. 

"Must Work" Laws. 
Interesting legislative by-products of the 
war are the anti-loafing measures in nine 
States — Delaware, Kentucky, Massachu- 
setts, New Jersey, New York, Rhode 
Island, and South Dakota in 1918 and 
Maryland and West Virginia in 1917 — to 
compel able-bodied men not subject to the 
draft to engage in useful occupations. The 
laws in most cases affect male residents 
between 18 and 50, and hours and wages 
for enforced work are to be maintained at 
prevailing standards. Persons temporarily 
unemployed because of differences with 
their employers, as well as bona fide 
students, are specifically exempted by most 
laws. 



HOLD YOUR LIBERTY BONDS. 



To successfully finance the war it is nec- 
essary that owners of Liberty Bonds hold 
their bonds if possible. Where for any good 
reason it ; s necessary for them to turn their 
bonds into cash they should seek the advice 
of their bankers. 

Liberty Loan Bonds are very desirable in- 
vestments, and crafty individuals are using 
various means to secure them from owners 
not familiar with stock values and like mat- 
ters. One method is to offer to exchange 
for Liberty Bonds stocks or bonds of doubt- 
ful organizations represented as returning 
a much higher income than the bonds. 

There are various other methods used and 
likely to be used, some of the gold-brick 
variety and others less crude and probably 
within the limits of the law. All offers for 
Liberty Bonds except for money and at 
market value should be scrutinized carefully. 
The bonds are the safest of investments and 
have non-taxable and other valuable features. 

To hold your Liberty Loan Bonds, if pos- 
sible, is patriotic. To consult your bankers 
before selling them is wise. 



THE OATH OF NATURALIZATION. 



None of us who were born abroad will 

ever forget the oath of allegiance we took. 

We swore thus : 

I do hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely 
and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance 
and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, 

state or sovereignty, and particularly to 

the of of whom I have heretofore 

been a subject; that I will support and defend 
the Constitution and laws of the United States 
of America against all enemies, foreign and do- 
mestic; and that I will bear true faith and 
allegiance to the same, so help me God. 

Note that the oath of naturalization par- 
ticularly mentions giving up allegiance to 
the old country. A man can not serve two 
masters. If he votes, acts, or talks in the 
interest of that old country for any reason 
whatsoever against the interests of his new 
allegiance he is a cheat, a perjurer; he is 
legally and morally a man without a 
country. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Page 5.) 
LAKE DISTRICT— (Continued). 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

Branches: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, 111 4 E. Austin Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, Mich 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, Wis 309 Tower Avenu< 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

TOLEDO, Ohio 821 Summit Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 35 West Eagle Street, 

Telephone Seneca 896. 

J. M. SECOND, Secretary. 

Branches: 

CHICAGO, 111 406 N. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND, Ohio 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio 85 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

CONNEAUT HARBOR. Or':;> 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, Ohio 821 Summit Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 
Marine Hospitals: 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 



Relief 
Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. T. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 
Erie, Pa. 
Menominee, Mich. 



Stations: 
Ogdensburg, N. T. 
Oswego, N. T. 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 59 Clay Street 

Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C 1424 Government Street 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 1365 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 North 30th Street 

SEATTLE, Wash.. 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 65 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 6 

PORTLAND, Or© 88% 3rd Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 64 Pike St. Viaduct, P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal.. 613 Beacon Street. P. O. Box 574 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 

PORTLAND, Ore 98 Second Street N 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 64 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash.... 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 42 
ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 188 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC. 

Headquarters. 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada P. O. Box 968 

KETCHIKAN, Alnska P. O. Box 201 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 1SI 



12 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




SEATTLE, WASH. 



The American Flint Glass Work- 
ers' Union lias secured wage in- 
creases as a result of conferences 
with manufacturers. Rates are ad- 
vanced 21 per cent, for blowers and 
30 per cent, for gathers, making the 
present wage $6.70 a day for the 
latter and $8.10 for the former. 

The Bureau of Labor Statistics of 
the Federal Department of Labor has 
started a countrywide probe of the 
high cost of living. The findings will 
be used as a basis in making wage 
adjustments, livery housewife visited 
by Government representatives is 
urged to furnish the information 
asked for. 

Striking cloak, suit and skirt 
makers at Cleveland, Ohio, have ac- 
cepted the plan submitted by Secre- 
tary of War Baker to end this dis- 
pute, which was caused by low 
wages and victimization. The settle- 
ment includes reinstatement of all 
strikers and wages fixed by referee 
for a period of not less than eight 
months. A Government representa- 
tive reported that 60 per cent, of the 
workers in this industry in Cleveland 
earned $800 or less a year, and that 
women earned only $10 a week for 
the first six months of their em- 
ployment. 

What is considered the Adminis- 
tration's attitude on t lie question of 
labor conscription was indicated by 
Louis F. Post, Assistant Secretary 
of Labor, before the Association of 
Commerce. The Federal official said: 
"The time may come when we may 
have to conscript workers in mines, 
forests and factories, but in the 
name of democracy these men shall 
not be conscripted until we have 
first conscripted the places where 
they shall work. This democracy 
will not stand for the conscription 
of men to work for the profit of 
other nun. The conscripted man 
must work for Uncle Sam and no 
one else." 

Failing to break the strike of its 
textile workers at Columbia, S. C, 
the Swift spinning mills made a suc- 
cessful appeal to Governor Dorsey 
to send the military to that city 
under the plea of existing violence. 
At a mass meeting of citizens the 
Governor was asked to order the re- 
turn of the soldiers to their camp, 
as existing conditions did not war- 
rant their presence. The mill owners 
have secured an injunction against 
Organizer Thomas of the United 
Textile Workers restraining him 
from attempting to unionize these 
workers. The military and injunction 
judge, however, have had little ef- 
fect on the strikers. 

The international conference in 
Laredo, Texas, between representa- 
tive- of American and Mexican trade 
unionists, beginning November 13 
next, promises to be an historic 
event. President Wilson has been 
invited to attend, as has President 
Carranza of Mexico. Governor Hunt 
of Arizona was the first State execu- 
tive to announce his intention of be- 
ing present. In a letter to Presi- 
dent Gompers he said: "A short way 
to establish a better understanding 
between tin's country imd Mexico 
than has ever existed in the past 
would be to establish that under- 
standing through labor. National 
conditions in tin- northern pari of 
Mexico are almost identical with 
Conditions of the border State- in 
this country; industries are the same. 
This can only be done through edu- 
cation and fraternity of labor." 



Office Prion* Elliott 1196 



Established 1890 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-Date Method* In Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

COMPASSES ADJUSTED 

500-1 SECURITIES BLDG. Next to U. S. Steamship Inspector*' Office 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Seattle, Wath., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mall forwarded 
during that period, they should notify 

the Agent to hold mail until arrived. 

Ahlstrom, Ellis Lldsten, Chris. 

Anderson, P. W. Lee, C. L. 

Anderson, Wm. Lubhurs, H. J. 
Antonsen, Charlie H.Lundgren, Chas. 

Aso. Guss Larsen, Ed. 

Ansiitz, John Larson, Gust 

Abolin, K. Lux, Chas. 

Aase, O. R. Malk, Peter 

Andersen, Julius Mathison, Martin 

Anderson, Andrew Micholsen, A. 

Anderson, J. E. McGregor, D. 

Andersen, A. C. Maher, Thomas 

Andersen, Martin McLeod, John 

Andersen. John Magnusen, Lars 

Albregtsen, G. Marthinson, Krs. 

Austin, H. Mikkelsen. K. -1620 

Anderson, Fredhof Mikkelsen, Holder 

Amlerson, T. -2ftfi4 MIckelsen, Harald 

Bnrkshom. C. F. McGillivray, F. B. 
Rarrv, W. D. 

Bates, J. D. McDonald, "Wm. 

Brown, Albert McPherson, James 

Brink, Harald Moe, Albert 

Bensen. J. A. Moore, Thomas 

Back, M. Moore, J. M. 

Barry, B. Muter, James 

Boacher, G. Nelsson, Emil 

Balstad, Alp Nelson, C. R. 

Brnriburrv. Edw. Nordfeldt. T. F. 

Burke, John Nelson, W. 

Carlsen, Oscar Nelsen, Steve 

Carlson, Harald Nelson, Svend F. 

Camper, L. F. Ness, Louis 

Carlson, Eric Norris, T. F. 
ChristofTersen. JohnNyhagen. Julius 
Cunningham Geo. F. Nelsen, Hans L. 

Caspersen, E. T. Nare, H. 

Carruthers, M. Nolan, J. 

Carlson, C. A. Nordstrom, John 

Carlson, J. -1586 Overland, Oscar 

Carlsen, C. G. Olsen, Harald 

Chrlatenaen, E. J. Olsen, Ole J. -542 

Orumlich, F. Olsen, Hjalmar 

Curran, W. Olsen, J. G. F. 

Drage, J. Ogga, Edward 

Desmond, C. Odall, E. W. 

Dunwoody, Geo. Olsen, O. P. -1141 

Eaton. L N. Olsen, Alf. 

Erkholm. B. Olsen. Geo. M. 

Edson, Frank Olsen, B. 

Endresln, I. Olsen, Elmer 

Eii man, O. -551 Olliver, James 

Kriekson, Chas. Pakki, Emil 

Eriksen, Erik Pap, Johannes 

Ellingsen, Erling Powell, H. A. 

Forslvind, Victor Paase, And 

Ferguson. B. Pallesen, K. 

Flansburg, Ira Petersen, John 

Feenes, I. O. Pendville, N. 

Fenwick, A. Petersen. B. 

Fernnnist, C. W. Petterson. Oscar 

Forshlng, J. M. Basmussel, Ole 

Gronlund, Osnar Rosen, E. H. 

Cahrlelsen, Peder Rallo, Max. 

Oirndisson, Ed. Rumquist, Gust 

Gronspth. .Tohan Ryberg, T. 

Oronroos, E. Rydquist, C. H. 

Crant. J. J. Rasmussen, Paul 

Cundersen, And. Rasmussen, R. P. 

Gustafson, Oscar Rlsbech, H. 

C-underson. C. A. Reid, W. R. 

TTanson, Ole Ring, W. 

Hansen, Henrich Rise. D- L. 

Hansen. Olaf Rod. S. 

Henrleksen, Ch. Ryan, Thos. 

Tleekola, S. Rylander. R. 

Henrtekson, Victor Sandberg, Otto 

Hemes, C. Sedon, Geo. 

Henrlksen. Geo. Snell, Adolf 

Hjorth. Knud Soderberg, Albin 

Hollman, W. C. Swanson. J. -1331 

Hohnstrom, Fritz Bund, Alex. 

Holmes, C. Seyfreid, M. 

Holten, Crist Stotzerman. Emil 

Hunter, G. H. Swanson, Wm. 

Hansen, Laurltz Sagura, John 

Kmll Sandanger, Ole 

HHllard, C. R. Sarin 

H.ihorsen. Hans J. Sauer, Ernie 

Hansen, R. -2072 Samuelsen. Harold 

Hetman, J. Selander, W. 

Herlitz. I. Skidsmo, W. A. 

Tneelhretson, O. E. Strangard, C. 

Iversen, Ole Sorensen, G. T. 

Jennings, Harry Sorensen, J. N. 

Johnson, Angl Saenila, Arvid 

Johnson. Herman Svenson, Edwin 

Joal, M. B. Thorsen. Herman 
Johnson. C. A. -2044Farve, J. O. 

.Tosefson, Ben Tempde, A. H. 

.Tnlisson, C. A. Torgesen, Laurits 

Jensen. G. Thoresen, I. N. 

Jarzenbeek. J. Trygg, Gust 

Jensen, Henry Tornquist. H. 

Johnson. Olaf Wurst. Walter 

Jorgenson, Wm. Walker, J. H. 
Jorgenson. Fredrick Wirtanen, Geo. 

Krueger, Johan Winther, T. 

Kallanen, M. J. Winstrom, Oscar 
Karlson, O. A. -ll90W1rta, G. 

K.ittel. Joseph Wahlstrom, Eric 

Kr, rlson. Ingvald Webach, S. 

Kluff, W. Walsh, E. 

Kramer, Otto Westgaard, John 

Kulich, John West, Joseph 

Larsen, Martin Ween, O. 

Larsen, Fred Welln, I. 

l.arsen, A. B. Wilson, S. G. 

Dawson, Arthur Wilson. A. B. 
Larsen. Nils Package. 

Larsen, Pete Johnson, Oscar 



SEATTLE, WASH., DEEP SEA 

FISHERMEN'S UNION 

LETTER LIST. 



Andersen, Ole 

Andersen, Oscar 

Aaberg, Crist 

Antonsen, Egle 

Andersen, Ola 

Andersen, Ole E. 

Andersen, Christ 

Aderson, Adolf 

Adersen, John 

Andersen, Emil 

Butt, George 

Berg. Olaf 

Booken, Frank 

Colbert, Frank 

Chester, Ellas 

Clark, John 

Campbell, Danlely 

Conradsen, Julius 

Glance, James 

Carlson, Carl O. 

Claboe, Bernard 

Campbell, Lee 

Danielsen. Olaf J. 

Doucett, William 

Dahl, Joe 

Dodds, F. E. 

Ehler. James 

Emerson, John A. 

Eriksen, Magne 

Eriksen, E. B. 

FJeldsted. Thomas 

Fenlon, Edward 

Feener, Herbert 

Fowler, S. J. 

Oreyley, Bert 

Halseth, Ed. 

Hollst, John 

Holmkvist, Axel 

Holmst, A. 

Huglin, John B. 

Hegge, Nils 

Halseth, Einar 

Howlett. James 

Holm, Arthur Jo- 
hannes 

Hansen, Tom 

Herman, Edward 

Heheizel, Joe 

Hansen, Charles 

Husby, Sivert 

Hellesvik, Albert 

Hansen, Carl Jojon 

Hansen, John 

Hansen, Andrew 

Hill, P. 

Holkerstad, Ma- 
rellus 

Kehoe, James 

Kristlansen, Kris- 
tian 

Lund, Hans 

Larsen, Alfred M. 

Larsen, Edward 

I^arsen, Hjalmar 

l.arsen, O. J. 

I.aurin, Allc 

Lorenson, Anton 

Lindseth. Ed. 

Lindkvist, Carl 

Ludvigsen, Carl 

Lowe, Martin 



Leary, John 
Llnthorn, Herbert 
Larsen, Tony 
Matland, Arthur 

Ing. 
Myklebust, Konrad 
Mathiasen, Martin 
Miller, Martin 
.M.Kiel. C. 
McAakell, John D. 
Monson, Martin 
Madsen, Waldemar 

Aug. 
Matson, Morris 
Moland, Ole 
Mogstad, John 
McDonald. J. M. 
Nordstrand, Arthur 

Marinlus 
Nelsen, Carl 
Nelson, O. A. 
Nelsen, Nels 
Nielsen, Martin 
Nelsen, Andrew 
Nickerson, Arthur 
Nass, Thorwald 
Naro, Hierommus 
Olsen, Jack 
Olsen, Joseph E. 
Olsen, Christ 
Overaa, Martin R. 
Oseason. Andrew 
Olsen, Charles 
Olsen, Aksel 
Olsen, Harry 
Olsen, Servln 
Powers, Charles H. 
Pedersen, Nils 
Petersen, Harry 
Pedersen, Charles 

O. 
Peterson, Alfred 
Pedersen, Christian 

Ellenor 
Poulsen, Peter 
Petersen, Ola 
Rasmussen. Martin 
Sandahl, Sivert 
Sedler, Anders 
Soderberg, Per A. 
Swanson. Sigurd 
Sollle, T. A. 
Sunde, K. 
Sundvik, Helge 
Slmes, Gordon 
Sorenson, Anton 
Thompson, Edward 
Thorsen, Knud 
Thomasen, Peter 
Turner, Ruben 
Tibbs, Fred 
Thompson, Alf 
Teal, Arch 
Wlek. Iver H. 
Webenstad, Jacob 
Winter, Aksel 
Waage, Bert 
Wick, Olaf 
Wick, Martin 
Wald. Pete 
York, J. M. 



Honolulu, H. T. 

Anderson, John E. Nelsen, C. F. 

Burk. Harry -1284 Petersen. Carl 

Crantly, C. W. Peters, Walter 

Eugenio, John Reither, Fritz 

Ekelund, Rlckhard Selberg, B. P. 

Ivertsen, Slgvald B. Strand. Conrad 

Lengwenus, W. L. Thompson, Emil N. 
Moller. F. 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER & HATTER 

Alatka Outfitter 

TWO BIG STORES 

Store No. 1 — Cor. Main and Flr*t 

Store No. 2— Westlak* and Pin* 

8EATTLE 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Creamatory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. 8. SMITH 
Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats. Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor in New York Nautical College. 
Room 4140 ARCADE BUILDING 
Third Floor, First Avenue Sid* 
SEATTLE, WA8H. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealsr In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Ye*ler Way SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

116-817 Flr«t Av«. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



Aberdeen, Wash , Letter List* 

Anderson, Peter KanKaanpaa, J. E. 

Albers, Geo. Lampe, Fred 

Browen, Alexander Lehtonen, A. 

Braun, Alex. Markman. II. 

Bjerk, G. T. Malkoff. Peter 

Bruhn, Chas. Melners, Herman 



When makinp purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention The Sea- 
men's Journal. 



Brun. Mattla 
Brant. Max 
Barrot, G. 
Rrandt, H. 
Bengtson, S. 
Davis, John 
EUassen, H. C. 
Flohten, James 
Frohne. Robert 
Hedrlck. Jack 
High, Edward 
Helander, J. F. 
Heyn, Th. 
Jansson, John 
Jansson, J. A. 



Magnusson. Charles 
Newman, I. 
Olsen, A. 
Olson, W. 
Olsen, Alf 
Olsen, Ferdenan 
Petersen, Harry 
Pedersen, Alf. 
Rahlf, J. 
Risenlus, Sven 
Rosenblad, Otto 
Swanson, G. 
Svenson, Gustaf 
Torin, Gustaf A. 
Thompson, Alex. 



Johanssen. John F. Valfors, Arvid 
Johnsen, Hans Wendt. W. 

Johnson, Hilmar Williams, T. C. 
Kallas, Augers Zimera, Geo. 

Khamp, S. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 
ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIE8 A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING. HATS, 

SHOES. COLLARS, SUSPENDERS. 

GLOVES. OVERALLS. 8HIRT8 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN, Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders Taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

320-322 So. F St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



>} 



Phone 263 

"Ole and Charley 

"The Royal" 
"The Sailors' Rest" 

Cigars, Tobacco* and Soft Drink* 
219 EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH. 



TACOMA, WASH. 
HARRY W. LEVY 

CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS 
Union Made Goods, Hat*, Shoe*, 

Trunk* and Suitcase* 

Fishermen'* and Sailors' Supplies 

(OLD TOWN) Tacoma, Wash. 

Main SIM 



QTWir.K'F'R^ See that this label (in light blue) appears on the 
O 1V1 KJ I\. t. IV J box in which you are served. 

*SEPT.I880jftH 

Issued by Aulhonly oi th* Cigar Makers' International II 

Union-made Cigars 

3hi* flfllillrt. lwtl»Ci|*io«wdmtl»ibMrwMi« *•«*•' WU»™""f 

"JUrjor ihc ot*« anno 'inuiuutioiiii union* xwna, ho^imjiowu hmm 
pt*aM«ftk* KWUiJ<JtTuiiMin(iiiiiUUX!uu.<«lLiAi<t OF THC OtATL itu^nmnmmam 

All mn«)nimi dii taa mm «J>« py.ii»i »cc«<<«i t» n«. 

9. yr. @U4u*4, j**** 

¥ CM/tf.i 



'f* 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



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JO 



The annual report of the American 
Hide & Leather Company for the 
last fiscal year shows a clear profit 
above fixed profits of $2,385,613. 
This is an increase of $622,863 over 
the previous year. 

Corporations which attempt to 
dodge war taxes by increasing their 
capital stock to cover surplus and 
undivided profits have been warned 
by Internal Revenue Commissioner 
Roper that this will be of no avail, 
since the capital actually invested 
in the business, rather than the 
amount of outstanding capital stock, 
is the basis for measuring taxable 
excess profits. 

Figures made public by the Wis- 
consin State Board of Health show 
Wisconsin has the lowest typhoid 
death rate in the Union — 6.7 per 
100,000 population. Kentucky ranks 
highest with 38.2 per 100,000 popu- 
lation, followed by North Carolina, 
with 31.9; Maryland, 27.1; Mississippi, 
21.2; Indiana, 20.4, and Ohio, 18.7. 
Wisconsin's ranking position is due, 
according to the State health of- 
ficials, to better protection of water 
supplies; greater knowledge by the 
civilian population of the care of 
typhoid patients and higher grade 
of plumbing and scientific disposal 
of household wastes. 

The Postoffice Department says 
that faulty address is one reason for 
the non-delivery of mail to soldiers 
in the military camps in the United 
States. Postmasters are instructed 
to notify relatives and friends that 
unless mail is addressed to the 
company and regiment or other dis- 
tinctive organizations of these sol- 
diers, delays in delivery or failure 
to deliver may result. It is urged 
that correct and complete addresses 
and return cards be placed upon all 
classes of mail, especially at this . 
time when many new men are join- 
ing the service and old units are 
being transferred to other camps. 

The National Forest Reservation 
Commission has just approved for 
purchase 54,672 acres of land for 
national forests in the White Moun- 
tains, Southern Appalachians and 
Arkansas. All of these lands solidify 
the Government holdings and carry 
out the present policy of the com- 
mission to consider no lands which 
do not tend to block in with others 
previously approved for purchase. 
The largest tract is one of 31,667 
acres in Poly County, Tenn. Tt fills 
out the entire southern end of what 
is known as the Cherokee purchasing 
area. The price approved was $6 an 
acre. A large portion of this tract 
is well timbered; there is more than 
20,000,000 feet of merchantable 
timber on the entire tract. 

Government demand for Sitka 
spruce for airplane constructon has 
made itself felt in the vicinity of 
Nome, Alaska, to the extent that 
staking of timber claims has com- 
menced in the Norton Ray section. 
A large area of timber land, said 
to contain approximately five million 
feet of excellent spruce timber, is 
reported to have been staked in 
the Tubuktolik section recently. 
Some of the trees are said to meas- 
ure six and eight feet through. This 
timber tract is situated close to the 
coast and may be logged and placed 
in the water with little effort. Spruce 
growths in the Kobuk section are 
also said to be coming in for con- 
siderable attention and timber from 
that district may soon be added to 
the world's supply. The Kobuk sec- 
tion has a water frontage on Kotze- 
bue Sound. 



14 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Domestic and Naval 



No tidings have been received 
from the long overdue Boston ship 
"Avon," now out 134 days from this 
port to the River Plate. The 
has made the passage in forty-six 
days, and her longest trip was 103 
days. It is generally believed the 
-■ 1 has fallen victim to a German 
raider or submarine. She carried 
40,000 cases of oil, which would 
prove a valuable prize for the Ger- 
mans. 

A suit for $55,000 damages has 
been filed in the Canal Zone Dis- 
trict Court at Ancon by the attorney 
Holder Middleton & Co. of Lon- 
don, England, against the Governor 
of the Panama Canal on account of 
injury to one of its ships while in 
transit through the canal. The case 
is in the nature of a test to ascer- 
tain whether a ship owner can re- 
cover damages in accidents to ves- 
sels while passing through the canal. 

Among the old shipyards on the 
North Atlantic Coast which have 
opened up this season for business 
alter being idle for many years is 
one at Harrington, Me., where 
Thomas G. Greenlaw is constructing 
three large schooners for Frye, 
Flynn & Co., of New York. Work 
on the first craft is well along, and 
it is expected to commence on the 
md in a lew weeks. At Camden, 
R. 1.. Bean lias contracted for three 
four-masted schooners, Each will be 
of 1150 gross tons, and cost about 
$150,000. 

In an effort to speed up the Gov- 
ernment's shipbuilding program, 
Charles M. Schwab, after a confer- 
ence with representatives of all the 
Atlantic Coast steel shipyards, at 
Philadelphia this week said that the 
direction and management of the 
yards hereafter would be collective 
rather than individual, and that 
piecework would be adopted as the 
wage basis. More than ninety ship- 
yard officials attended the confer- 
ence, which Mr. Schwab described 
as a "get together and speed up" 
meeting. 

The Emergency Fleet Corporation 
has been reorganized, the purpose 
being to outline more specifically the 
duties of Mr. Schwab's assistants. 
Charles Piez is named general man- 
ager, which title he resigned to retain 
that of vice-president in charge of 
construction when Mr. Schwab be- 
came director-general. Howard Coon- 
ley is named vice-president in charge 
of administration, subject to the man- 
agerial direction of Mr. Piez. J. L. 
Ackerson is made executive assistant 
to Mr. Schwab in charge of shipyard 
plants, supply, wood and steel ship 
construction, passenger transporta- 
tion, housing, plant protection and 
planning. 

Ercight traffic between New York 
and Philadelphia through the Raritan 
Canal has increased greatly in vol- 
ume during the last few months. 
This is said to be one of the results 
of the management of the United 
States Railroad Administration. The 
Raritan Canal is being operated by 
the Inland Waterways Commission, 
of which G. A. Tomlinson is Federal 
manager. The policy of the commis- 
sion is to direct the operations of 
the canal and to encourage outside 
companies to operate their boats. 
I he only company running a regu- 
lar daily service is the New York 
and Delaware River Steamship Cor- 
poration, which has a New York 
terminal at the Brooklyn Bridge 
Dock, and a Philadelphia terminal 
at Pier 16, South Wharves. 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 
PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement and 7th Ave. 
HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 29th, 1918 
Assets --------- 

Deposits ---------- 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 

Employees' Pension Fund - - 



Okesson, Erick Olsen, Nlcolai 

Olafson. M. Olsen, O. -1283 

Oiausen, Christian Olsen, Olal S. 



$59,397,625.20 

55,775,507.86 

2,286,030.34 

284,897.17 



OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK, l'resident 

GEO. TOURNT Vice-Pres. and Mgr. A. II. it. SCHMIDT, Viee-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE, Vice-President 

WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier 

A. H. MLLLLR, Secretary 
WS1 D. NEWHOL'SE, Assistant Secretary 
GOODFELLOW, EELS, MOURE & ORRICK, 
General Attorneys 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
JOHN A. BUCK A. H. R. SCHMIDT A. HAAS „„„__- 

GEO. TOURNY I. N. WALTER E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. T. KRUSE HUGH GOODFELLOW ROBERT DOLLAR 



_ _ . - i • . I Hellsten, A. H. Holmstrom, Carl A. 

San rranClSCO Letter LlSt Henderson, Robert Holmstrom, D. I 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised tor three 
mouths only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from the date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
S. A. Silver, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 

Aasanen, Geo. F. Anderson, C. N. 
Aberg, E. Anderson, F. V. 

Abranamsen, Anton Anderson, Gus. H. 
Abrahamflon. A. W. Andersson, Hilding 
Ackerman, Valfred Anderson, J. -1957 



Acosla, Miguel 
Ahlgren, W. A. 
Alansburg, — 
Aluwe, Joe 



Anderson, John C. 
Anderson, Paul 
Anderson, Sven 
Andersson, A. T. 



Andersen, A. F. C. Andersson, Erick 

Andersen, H. -1526 Andersson, Gottfried 

Andersen, John Andersson, J. R. 

Andersen, M. -20S4 -1246 

Andersen, Nils F. Andreas, Johannes 

Andersen, Rasmus Andresen, Jorgen 

Anderson, Alfred N. Appelgvist, John 

Anderson, Andrew Archibald, C. R. 



Anderson, Albert 
Anderson, C. 
Anderson, Carl J. 

Baah, M. 

Babchuck, Ernest 



Ask, Alfred E. 
Augustine. Anthony 
Azarov, Daniel 

Blackwood, Simpson 
Blalle. Ernest 



Packman, A. -2056 Blixt, Gus 



Bahn, C. F. 
Baggs, H. L. 
Bandel, Curt 
Barry, Dick 
Harry, inos. 
Barry, Wm. J. 
Benrowitz, Felix 
Benson, Helge 
Bergesen, Berger 
Bergstrom, J. 
Berner, Albert 
Bernstein, Hans 



Blomgren, Carl A. 
Blomgren, Fred 
Blomgren, M. A. 
Blomkvist, Albert 
Blucker, John 
Borgen, Arne 
Borgesen, Oscar 
Bos, Johannes 
Boyce, R. P. 
Brabower, Martin 
Brian, Jos. 
Brown, George W. 



Bertelsen, Kristian Bunes, John 



Biron, E. 
Bjorklund, Eric 
Bjorlund, Nils H. 
Birhnes, Ole A. 



Bye, Alf 
Bye, Didrick 
Bye, Kristian 



Christensen, C. 
Christensen, Hans 
Christensen, Harry 
Christensen, H. C. 
Christensen. Oskar 
Christoffersen, C. 
i !hrlstofferson, 

i iiinval 
Clarke. J. R. 



Calem, Anthony 
Call. Fred 
Carlsen, Albln 
Carlson, Carl 
Carlsen, Severin 
Carsten, A. 
Carlstrand. Gustal 
Cashin, J. B. 
Cassberg, K. G. A. 

Dahlgren, W. A. 
Dalhstrom, Arthur 

H. 
Dahlstrom, Ernst 
Dahlstrom, G. M. 
Danlelsen, John J. 
Daniels, L. M. 
Davidson, Waldemar Dreyer. Jack O. 
De Bara, Harry Dukatz, Herman 



Delong. K. 
Dlas. E. 

Diswert, William 
Dobbin, Harry 
Dolan, C. 
Donk, Johan 

k, Karl 



Duncan, W. J. 

Erlckson, Erik 
Erlckson, E. R. 
Erickson, George 
Erickson, John 
Erickson, L. 
Erickson, Nils 
Ericsson, Ernest G. 
Ernest, Edward 
Esterberg. Gust. 
Eucsen, Sigurd 
Eversen. Better 
Ewin, Arthur II. 



De Moss, E. 
De Roose, Jack 

Edmonds, John 
Edvarse, Frits 
Egllt, Brenz 
Eissing, B. 
Ekelund, Rich. 
Eliassen, Adolf E. 
Ellerman, Chas. T. 
Engel. Paul 
Engellen, D. A. 
Engstrom, Ben. 
Erick, John 
Erickson. Akael 
Erickson. Chas. 

Fagerberg, Ivan 
Fagerlie, Odell 
Falk. Axel 
Feschio, Paul 
Ficht, Arthur 
Fick, Max 
Fildes. Wilfred 
Finck, John 
Fjellman, George 
Flansburgh, I. 

Garcia, Jose 
Garfield. G. 
Grant, August 
Grant, Lewis 
Gray, Hamilton 
Gregg, Oliver 
Green, Laurence 
Ore«rg. Harry B. 
Grinberg, N. 
Groth, Charles 

Hallen, Victor 

Hallstrom, Frank 

Halvarsen. Hnn» 

Halvorsen, Henry 

Hammarquist, Alfred Hanson, Edward 

Hammarquist, Guss Harko. Antoa 



Flem. Knut 
Folvik. Carl L. 
Forgensen, H. R. 
Forslund, Fred 
Fraser, Alexander 

V. 
Fraser, James 
Fredriksen, B. D. 
Fredrickson, M. 

Grundman. 3 
Gulbranson, B. 
Gulfeldt, A. 
Gundersen, Christ 
Gundersen, Hans C. 
Gusgron, Joseph 
Gustavsen, Anton 
Gussum, Joe 
Guthrie, R. 



Hansen, R. E. 
Hansen, Rudolph 
Hanson, Arthur 
Hanson, Karl J. 



Holt, Fredrick S. 
Hood, Chas. S. 
Hoply, C. 
Horton, B. 
Howlngton, R. L. 
Hubbert, John L. 
Hulsveld, Berend 
Hunter, John Lee 
Hyde, Theo. J. 

Isakson, John A. 

Johanson, Arvo 
Johanson, Edward 
Johanson, Robert 
Johnsen, G. 
Johansson, Bernard 
Johansson, John 
Johansen, Waltner 
Johndahl, Harry C. 
Johnsen. Johan 
Johnson, Andrew L. 
Johnson, Anton 
Johnson, John 
Johnson, Julius N. 
Johnson, Maddy 
Johannesen, Helge Johnson, Nathaniel 
Johannesen, Johan Johnson, Ole 
Johansen, Asmus Johnston, Leslie 
Johansen. Chas. J. Jones, Fred 
Johansen, Fritz Jordan, Henry 

Johansen, J. A. Jorgenson, J. 



Henensen, A. 
Henriksen, C. 
Hildes. W. 
Hill -1387 

Hill, 2030 

Hiorth, Jens 
Hogstrom. Harry 
Holmes, Fred 
Holmgren, H. 

llling, Carl F. 

Jacobsen, Jacob 
Jakobsen, Joaklm 
Jacobsen, Martin 
Janerholm, Hans 
Jansson, Fredrik 
J ensen, A. K. 
Jensen, Anton 
Jensen, Henry 
Jensen, Jens G. 

. Julius W. 
Jensen, Lorentz 
Jensen, Oskar 
Jensen, Oscar A. 
Jorguson, Robin 



Johansen, John 



Jurgens, A. 



Kaasik, August Kjellberg, A. C. 

Kallberg. Arvld Klink. Alfred 

Kallas, Alexander Knapp, G. A. 

ivanip, Charles Knaut, Charles 

Karlsen, Victor Kneehtman, \V. 

Karlson, August Knudsen, Daniel 
Karlson, G. 1190 Koch, Gottlieb 

Karlsson, K. S. Koff, J. 

Karlsson, Johan Kokki, Emil 

Kannan, Wm. B. Koppel, John 

Kasklnen, A. Kratton, R. M. 

Kaspersen, Henrik Krlshjan, K. W. 



Kelso, M. L. 
Klnamon, Jack 
Kirpin, Matti 
Kive, Karl 

Labuhu, Frank 
Lagerquist, G. A. 



Kruse, Chas. 
Kullborn, Oscar 
Kurgrel, Oles 
Kustel, Victor J. 

Letchford, Alexander 
Lewis, Owen J. 



Langworthy, EruestLiadel, Peter 
Larsen, Aleksander Llndwali, Kichard 



Larson, Arthur 
Larsen, Gustav B. 
Larsen, H. 
Larsen, Lauritz 
Larsen, Rangwald 
Larsen, Theo. 
Larsen, Tonwald 
Larson, Cornelius 
Larson, L. A. 
Larson, William 
Larsson, Ragnar 
Leinasar, Jacob 

Madsen, Tom 
Magnusson, E. W. 
Mahler, Hans 
Makela, Andrew 
Maki, Ivar 
Malmgren, Oskar 
Malstrom. Erick 
Marklln, John 
Markman. Harry 
Martin, B. 
Martinsen, Nordal 
Marshall. E. R. 
Martinsen, John 
Marus. J. 
Mathiesen, Axel 
Mathlson, David 
Matson, K. A. 
McCormlck, Lau- 
rence 



Linsner, Paul K. 
Little, J. 
Lobergr, Bror 
Lubbers, Henrlck 
Lundberg, Torsten 
Lundgren, C. G. 

-1689 
Lund, John A 
Lundstrom, E. W. 
Ludwlgsen, A. 
Lynch, James 
Lyngaard, George 

Meskell, M. 
Mess, William 
Meyer, H. 
Miatas, Nicolai 
Milnor, C. D. 
Miller, Robert E. 
Mirabal, Jose 
Mirttinen, John E. 
Mitt. Mikke 
Mock, A. L. 
Moller, Chas. R. 
Moller, F. A. 
Moller, S. O. 
Morris, Lee 
Mortensen, B. 
Mortensen -2191 
Mulley, James 
Morris, Oscar R. 
Morrison, Philip 



McLeod, Norman A.Munsen, Burger 
McManus, Peter Murray, Eugene 

McNair. H. S. S. Moxnes, Christ 
Melander, J. K. 



Hamm, R. 
Hannus, Peter 
Hansen, Charles 
Hansen. Chris. 
Hansen. Harry 
Hansen, Jargen 
Hansen. Johannes 
Hansen. M. -9R» 
Hansen, Rangvald 



Hauth. Carl 
Hawkins. C. A. 
Hay, C. W. 
Hazen. J. S. 
Heln. M. 
Heaney, A. P. 

-1487 
Heldal, Trygoe H. 
Heldom, H. 



Namestad. Arthur 
Neilson, Neil 
Nelson, Axel W. 
Nelson, Charlie 
Nelson, Ernest 
Nelson, Frank 
Nelson, Harold 
Nelson, N. P. 
Nelson, Rasmund 
Nelson. Steve 
Nelson, Victor 



Nielsen, Harald J. 
Nielsen, Harold J. 
Nielsen, Jens 
Nlewert, Aug. 
Nilsen, Fred. -520 
Nllsen, Hans L. 
Nllson, Hjalmar 
Nilsson, Hilding 
Noblanc. Louts 
Norberg, J. A. 
Nordbye, Jacob 



Newman, Gustav A. Nolan, George S. 

Nlcolaisen, Otto Nordenberg, J. 
Nielsen, E. S. -1116 Nordstrom, Bror 

Nielsen, Kristian Nordstrom, Wiktor 

Nielsen, Svend G. Nurkin, H. 

Oakley. Loren D. O'Conolly, Frank 

-:. Einar Ofeldt, C. 



Ulgrein, Verner 

Olesen, Ingwald 

Olsen, Ausgar 

Olsen, E. F. -1280 

Olsen, H. -478 

Olsen, Hans 

Olsen, Harry 

Olsen, Helmer H. 

Olsen, Herman 

Olsen, Mandens 

i'aavilalnen. A. J. 

Palhen, Geo. H. 

Palieen, Magnus 

Paulsen, Karl 

1'arearey, P. H. 

Parks, Leslie 

Parral, Olegario 

Pattenberg, John 

Paunu, J. 

Payton, M. C. 

Pedersen, H. -1263 

Pederson, Carl 

Pederson, Charles 

Pedersen, Henry G. Plhkala, E. 

Pedersen, M. G. Pllcher, H. J 



Olsen. Ole -1325 
Olsen, Regmar 
Olsen, Tom 
Olson, John 
Olsson, E. W. 
Olsson, Carl G. 
Oseberg, Ansgar 
Oslund, B. N. 
Ostergren, Josef 
Osterman, John 
Peterson, Frank G. 
Peterson, Frederick 

H. 
Peterson, Gus 
PfouUch, Karl 
Peterson, L. -1389 
Peterson, L. A. T. 
Peterson, O. -1551 
Peterson, Otto 
Peterson. R. T. 
Pettersen, Franc 
Petterson, Einar E. 
Pettersson. T. -1734 



Pederson, Uluf 
Perkins, Will 
Perrin, H. 
Peters, B. 
Petersen, Aage 
Petersen, A. -1676 



Pink, J. 
Pint, G. H. 
Pope, B. 
Post, Albert 
Poulsen, Oscar E. 
Powell. H. A. 



Petersen, N. -1698 Prestergaard, W. 
Petersen, Olav -1595Putkka, Werner 
Peterson, F. 

Quickman, \\\ Qulrage. Juan 

Kadke, Paul Roe. Berger 

Ram, E. Roesberg, Chas. V. 

Kamstad, Andreas Ronberg, Kristian 
Rasmussen, Karl V. Ronberg, Niels C. 
Reimer, Peter M. Roos, Yrjo O. 



Repson, Ed. 
Revheim, Uskar 
Rlisgaard, Soren 
Ringman, Carl V. 
Robertson, Robert 
Rod, Halfdan 
Rod, Sakarias 

Saarnio, Lennart 
Saharoft. J. A. 
Sahlln. Nils 



Rosen, Valfrid 
Ruckmlch, A. 
Ruger, Harry W. 
Rundstrom, Albert 
Runnqulst, Gust. 
Ryan, Patrick 



Stangeland, Peter 
St. Clair. Tho. 
Stein. Albert W. 



Sandblom, Konrad Btensland, Paul 
Sandkvlst, Eric Stenuesen, August 



Stephenson, V. 
Stolzerman, E. 
Stork, C. 
Stranberg, P. 
Strandberg, John E. 
Strand, Olav A. 
Stromblad. Olaf 
Strybos, D. 
Stupurak, J. V. 
Sund, Alex 
Svanson, William 
Svendsen, Henry 
Svendsen, S 
Svenaen. A. 
Svensson, John 
Swalnson, Edward 
Swanaon, E. -2675 
Swanson, Emanuel 
Sweeney, Denis 
Swensen, Anker 
Swenson, Rubin 
Bwlnbauer, C. 

Thorstensen. Blrger 
Tilt, Clifford 



Sandstrom, O. H. 
Sanne, Rudolph 
Sarin, Charlies 
Sarin, Wilnelm A. 
Schaab, Fred 
Schmidt C. 
Sederholm, A. 
Shahaken, John 
Silveira, Manuel 
Simensen, Arne 
Simos, Antonio 
Simpson, L. C. 
Smedsvig, Olaf 
Smith, Geo. C. 
Smith, John T. 
Soneson, Wilhelm 
Sorensen, Jorgen 
Sorensen. O. E. 
Sorensen, L. A. 
Sorensen, S. C. 
Sorensen, Soren P. 
Spatz, K. 

Taival, Alf. 
Tanman, Robert 

Tanum, Helge -973 Tomls, Frank 

Terki, Anton Tomsen, Waldemar 

Thee, Rudolf Tomson, Charley 

Thomas, Nelson Toomey, Paul 

Thorn, Edmund Trost, Peder K. 

Thompson, Alex Toutt, Walter 

Thorngren, Chas. G. Trimmer, David 

Uhlen, Jack 

Valkonen, Veda 
Van Kordencordt, 

W. A. 
Vargas, Santiago 

Wachter, John 
Wagner, Ralph W. 
Wall, Alfred 
Wall, George 

Wallenstrand. HarryWillberg. Chas. 

Wamser, A. Williams, John 

Wank, Roman A. Williams. T. C. 

Wannqulst. Ernest Williams. W. 

Ward, Joe Wilson, Williams 

Wayne. A. C. Winkler, Otto 

Weisshaar, Rudolph Wipochi, Anthony 

Welsson, Emll Wlschcar, Ernest 

Weltz, Hill Wolters. H. F. 

Wesgard, Jens Woodley, Clifford R. 

West, I. Wright, J. A. 

Wezwager, Andrew Wurst, Walter 

Zetergren, E. 

PACKAGES. 

Fagerberg, Ivan Mortensen. J. C 

Frazer, Alex V. -2191 

Halvorsen, Elmer N.Mourice, Francis 



Verkamman, M. P. 
Verkamo, J. J. 
Vlckery, Curtis 

Wlchman, Daniel 
Wlhavainen, Geo. 
Wilen, Isac W. 
Wllks. J. 



Hansen, Axel 
Johnson. Carl 
Johnson, Ivar 
Jurgenson, Julius 
Kerr, H. J. 
Larsen, C. A. 
Malmqulst, E. J. 



Nelson, A. -1092 
Olson. Knut 
Osterholm, John W. 
Smith, John T. 
Stenensen, A. 
Strom, Carl 
Wesgaard, Jena 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Any member of the crew of "C. S. 
Holmes" who was present when Gust 
Fondahn was hurt near Cape Flat- 
tery when in tow of "Goliath" on 
the 3d of January, 1913, will please 
communicate with Attorney S. T. 
Hogevoll, 627 Pacific Building, San 
Francisco, or with F. R. Wall, Mer- 
chants Exchange Building. 9-11-18 



WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

JOE WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 

Exclusively 

28 EAST STREET, near Market 
Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 1619 
Repairing Done While You Wait, by the Latest Machinery 

Work Called For and Delivered 
WE USE ONLY THE BEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 




THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 




WS.S. 



TOR SAVINGS STAMPS 

1S8UED BY THE 

UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 25, 35 and 50 cents per day, 
or $1.50, $2 to $2.50 per week, with all 
modern conveniences. Free Hot and 
Cold Shower Bath on every floor. Ele- 
vator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager 



Phone Garfield 2457 



HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 

Res., Randolph 27 
Office Hours, 9 a. m. to 6:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

JNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 

Prices. :: :: Union Made Goods Only. 

103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Jortall Bros. Express 

Stand and Baggage Room 
— at — 
212 EAST ST., San Francisco 
Phone Douglas 5348 



Kearny 3863 



JENSEN & NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



Residence, 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 

Phone Douglas 1415 San Francisco 



French American 
Bank of Savings 

Savings and Commercial 



108 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

RESOURCES, $10,000,000 

Member of Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco 

United States Depository for 
Postal Savings Funds 

DIRECTORS 



G. Beleney 
J. A. Bergerot 
S. Blssinger 
Leon Bocqueraz 
O. Bozlo 
Charlee Carpy 



J. M. Dupas 
John Ginty 
J. S. Godeau 
Arthur Legallet 
Geo. W. McNear 
X. De Plchon 



East Street No. 19, near Market 

TAILOR 

To the U. S. Navy 

GEO. A. PRICE 

(IS RIGHT) 

Blues— UNIFORMS— Whites 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING, ETC. 

500 Lockers Free San Francisco, Cal. 



Union 
Hade 
BffT 




Ask for this Label 
on Beer 



INTL UNION OF 
UNITED BREWERY and 
SOFT DRINK WORKERS 

OF AMERICA 

Asks you to write and speak to your 




Ask for this Label 
on Soft Drinks 



STATE ASSEMBLYMEN AND STATE SENATORS 



WORK AND VOTE 

Against the Ratification of the National Prohibition Amendment 
to the Constitution 



News from Abroad 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 

716 MARKET STREET— at Third and Kearnv 

Union Made 
in Our Own Shop 



SUITS TO ORDER, 
$30.00 TO $50.00 

We Make Naval 
Uniforms 




Weekly Wap.es 

No Piece Work 

EiRht-Hour Work Day 




JACOB PETERSEN & SON 
Proprletori 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
RAM TTRAMCTSCO 



TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO ST., near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

'Nuf Sed 



Phone Douglas 3725 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 East Street, San Francisco 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 

OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



NOTICE. 



The following named members, in 
order to comply with the military 
regulations, should at once call or 
write to the Sailors' Union office 
for their questionnaire: 



Aalta, Albert 
Aalta, Henry E. 
Abranamson, A. W. 
Aliaras, Ikraarl 
Anderson, Sven 
Aries, Frank 
Axelsen, J. H. 
Baardsen, Hans M. 
Bergstrom, John E. 
Borm, Carl 
Bowma, Jan 
Brandt, Blrger 
Burg, John 
Byglin. O. O. 
Carlsen, H. C. 
Carlson, Einar G. 
Castro, Julian F. 
Eliasson, J. E. 
Ellison, Morris 
Ericksen, John 
Falvik, Carl E. 
Forssell, Carl A. 
Gardner, Edmund 
Greenitz, John 
Gumdeross. H. C. 
Hansen, Johannsen 
Hansen, B. P. A. 
Hennrikson, Henry 
Hermann, Carl E. 
Jacobson, Malt 
Jansson, Karl H. 
Jensen, Henry 
Kilstrom, Dom 
Lehtinan, Ernest E. 
Loine. Frank L. 
Ludwlg, Nils H. 



Lundstrom, E. W. 
Lund, John A. 
Maki, Malt 
Makla, Anden 
Mathiesen, Axel 
Nielson, Hans 
jNilsson, Nils H. 
Odenberg, Adolph 
Olsen, Nicolai 
Olsen, Claio 
Olsen, Mandius 
Olsen, Angar M. 
Olsen, Ragnar 
Olson, Knut 
Ostergard, Frank 
Pederson, C. E. 
Peterson, Conrad 
Pettersen, Einar E. 
Rasmussen, R. H. 
Rasmussen, L. A. 
Rod, Sakarlas 
Roed, Hjalmar 
Roffer, Jack 
Rontved, O. J. 
Schellenz, Charles 
Schlppman, H. C. 
Schuldt. Theodore 
SIge, Herman 
Strasdin, Paul 
Stovener, Anders S. 
Tanum, Helga 
Wall. Alfred 
Wamser, Christian 
Wilcke. J. W. G. 
Wilhelmson. John 
Zwart, A. 



Alaska Fishermen 

San Francisco. 



Anderson, Frank 
Anderson, Julius 
Blom, John 
Broman, Emil 
Burg, John 
Damberg, A. A. 
Duggan, Thomas 
Israelsen, Isak 
Johnson, Emil 

Jacobsen, C. 

lohansen, H. 
ECjendalen, Ole V. 
Larsen, Olof 



Mittchel, Joseph 
Moberg, Oscar 
Nilsen, Olof 
( Hson. Anskar 
Oseberg, A. A. 
Paulsen, Axel J. 
Slmmonds, J. 
Steen, J. J. 
Sheldon, C. B. 
Tamirsor, Peter 
Wikman. Daniel 
\V. brr, Fred 
Weisham, R. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



Mercantile Lunch 

Is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy J & Haakon's 

Proprietors 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 



612 Fourth Street 



Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers in Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

A SQUARE MEAL 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



Sailors' Outfitter 
BENJAMIN'S 

The Old Reliable 

CLOTHING. SHOES. HATS, RUBBER 

AND OIL CLOTHING 

207 Second Street Eureka, Cal. 

E. BENJAMIN, Prop. 



Cigars and Tobaccos 

Periodicals 
F. W. MOGENSEN 

217 E STREET EUREKA, CAL. 



DRUGS, KODAKS, 

STATIONERY 
The REXALL Store 

ATKINSON & WOODS 
F STREET, Cor. 2d, EUREKA, CAL. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention The Sea- 
men's Journal. 



The Newfoundland schooner "Fish- 
erman," recently reported lost at 
sea, was not sunk by a submarine, 
but sprang a leak and had to be 
abandoned. Advices received in Hali- 
fax state that the crew were sent 
from Lisbon to Liverpool en route 
home. 

Merchant tonnage losses in July 
due to enemy action and marine risk 
was 313,011, which makes the total 
for the quarter ending with July for 
allied and neutral countries 959,392. 
Ships built in British yards and in 
foreign yards on British account in 
July reduced the British deficit to 
22,311, which compares favorably with 
the average monthly deficit during 
the first six months of this year of 
90,000 tons. 

It is estimated in Great Britain 
that 300,000 cottages must be built 
there soon and lumbermen of the 
British Isles are discussing the prac- 
ticability of producing the lumber 
from their own wood growths. The 
housing scheme calls for nearly a 
billion feet and the effect of the 
building trades entering the market, 
which now supplies only the war- 
time essential industries, is given 
the most serious consideration. 

The Norwegian Government whal- 
ing vessels have caught over 100 
whales since the prohibition against 
whaling was raised a short time ago. 
Ninety-four of them were taken to 
a whaling station near Bergen, which 
has been working for three months. 
It is calculated that the whaling 
will continue for six months and that 
with five stations and 17 ships it 
should be possible to catch 500 
whales every year. One whale yields 
an average of 30 barrels of whale 
oil, or from 5 to Syi tons of fat. 
The fat is used to a great extent 
in making margarine. 

The operation of a number of the 
wooden steamers which have been 
built in British Columbia for the 
Imperial Munitions Board will be 
entrusted by the British Govern- 
ment to Messrs. Easton, Greig & Co., 
of Glasgow, Scotland, the first ship 
to be placed in their charge being 
the "War Masset," which was built 
by the Foundation Co., and com- 
pleted by Yarrow, Ltd. Other ships 
to be operated by the Scottish con- 
cern will be the "War Haida" and 
the "War Skeena" which are now 
in course of completion for sea. 
The first six vessels of the wooden 
fleet built in this Province were 
turned over to the Fernie Line for 
operation. 

A recent issue of Le Matin, the 
Parisian newspaper, gives an inter- 
esting example of characteristic 
American energy and speed. In a 
certain spot in central France where 
last December stood a thick forest 
there has sprung up, under the 
hands of American engineers and 
workmen a huge meat-refrigerating 
plant. The encampment, which has 
for its special object the provision- 
ing of American soldiers in France, 
covers a space of 10,000 acres. The 
refrigerating plant holds 10,400,000 
pounds of meat, which is equivalent 
to 15,000 cattle weighing on the 
average 700 pounds apiece. It pro- 
duces 500 tons of ice per clay in 
excess of that used at the plant, 
which is used in the transportation 
of meat in the refrigerator cars and 
also for the conservation of other 
perishable foodstuffs, especially mar- 
garine. 



16 



THE 



N'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits 



Lacking; in Range. — "Docs the new 
soprano's voice till the church?" 

"No; I notice some vacant seat- 
up in the gallery. - ' — Boston Trans- 
cript. 



How Ma Felt.— Willie— Paw. why 
do women cry at a wedding? 

Maw— .Because they have been 
married themselves, my son. 

p aw — You better keep your mouth 
shut, young man. — Cincinnati En- 
quirer. 



Will be Fed Up With Fight— The 
American soldiers are the best-fed 
fighting men in the world, accord- 
ing to the War Department's diet 
expert. But before the war is over 
the German soldiers are going to be 
the best fed-up fighting men in the 
world. — Syracuse Herald. 



Yes, Why, Russia?— After biting 
off a Slavonic ear in the first act, 
throwing her off the bridge in the 
second, kicking her in the eye in 
the third, Germany now exclaims 
as the curtain rises on the fourth, 
"Why do you not love me, Russia?" 
— Kansas City Times. 



Yeast — So you've been back to your 
old home town, have you? 

Crimsonbeak — I certainly have. 

Yeast— And did anybody recognize 
you? 

Crimsonbeak — I should say so. 
Everybody I owed money recognized 
me instantly. 

Yeast — Only those recognized you? 

Crimsonbeak — Only those? Say, I 
owed everybody in town when I left. 
— Yonkcrs Statesman. 



Words Could Not Hurt.— "James," 
said Mrs. Mellow to the man ser- 
vant, "can you find out whether the 
tinned salmon was all eaten last 
night? I don't want to ask the new 
cook, because she may have eaten 
it, and then she would feel un- 
comfortable." 

"Please, ma'am," replied James, 
"the new cook ate all the salmon, 
an' no matter what you was to say 
to her you couldn't make her more 
uncomfortable than she is now." — 
lialtimore American. 



An Invitation 

We Invite deposits from every one — 
rich, poor, old and young. We recog- 
nize no classes, but treat large and 
small depositors with the same cour- 
tesy and consideration. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OI^D AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation in the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have- changed, and the 
American stamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how Ignorant the seaman may he, even in the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and In a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 




Christensen's Navigation 
School 

Established 18M 

257 HANSFORD BLDQ., 268 MARKET 

STREET 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. 




SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront 
since 1 866 — over 50 years. Enough said. 

We DO NOT Supply Mattresses or Bedding to Vessels 

J. COHEN & CO. 



BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 



72 EAST STREET 



Opposite Ferry Post Office 



Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



HENRY HEINZ 



When You Buy 
from Us, Liberty 
Bonds are Ac- 
cepted for Cash. 



Phone Douglas 6752 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
Original Size 




SOLID GOLD $1.50 
GOLD FILLED .50 



Diamonds 

Watches - 64 market street 

High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



Do you like a good, long, cool 
smoke? If so, get a package of 
Bagley's Lime Kiln Club Cut 
Plug for your pipe. Manufac- 
tured by John J. Bagley & Co. 
for over fifty years. 



UNION LABEL SHIRTS 

AT FACTORY PRICES 
DIRECT TO WEARER 

EAGLESON & CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO, 1118 Market Street 
Los Angeles, 112-16 So. Spring Street Sacramento, 717 K Street 

Our Union Catalogue of Shirts and Furnishings 

Endorsed by San Francisco Labor Council 

San Francisco Building Trades Council 

San Francisco Label Section 

State Building Trades Council 




Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Silverware 

£ere/mn 'Co.- 



BUY 

MEN'S 

FURNISHINGS 

AT 




Market at Fifth 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 
Prions Kearny 619 

Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Boots, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and OH Clothing 

of All Kinds, Watches, 

Jewelry, Etc. 

676 THIRD STREET 

At 3rd and Townsend, San Francisco, Cal. 




715 MARKET STREET, Above Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Qames Jt. Sorensert 

tfrws. ana Jr.ajj 
At the Big Red Clock 
■ and the Chimes. 



Jewelers, Watchmakers, Opticians 

Big Stock— Everything Marked in Plain Figure* 

THE ONE-PRICE JEWELRY STORE 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 



I Want You 
Seamen 
to wear 

Union 
Hats 

$2.50, $3.50 
$5.00 

"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

Deserves Your Patronage 




Union Store 
Union Clerks 



72 Market Street 

Next to Ocean Market 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 



BED SEAL LKjAB CO., MANUPAtTLBCfiS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 



CJulBusifH 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



s 1 





jmMIi 






FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 




A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: 


Justice by Organization. 


VOL. XXXII, No. 2. SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1918. 




Whole No. 2504. 



THE VALU E OF EDUCATION. 

Views of Labor's Representative on the U. S. Board for Vocational Education. 



Mr. Arthur E. Holder, for many years Legis- 
lative Agent for the American Federation of 
Labor at Washington, D. C, and now the rep- 
resentative of Labor on the Federal Board for 
Vocational Education, has supplied the Journal 
vvitli the following instructive paper on the 
"Value of Education": 

Education is preparation for life. Primarily 
it is maintenance of life. It is necessary to a 
continuation of life. When education in the 
life of an individual, a group or a nation 
stops, then decay commences; dissolution and 
death are a natural result. 

Herbert Spencer tersely defined education in 
these words: 

"To prepare us for complete living is the 
function which educajion has to discharge." 

Webster's definition is: 

"To form and regulate principles and charac- 
ters, to prepare and fit for any calling or busi- 
ness by systematic instruction; the impartation 
or acquisition of knowledge, skill or discipline 
of character." 

The education of our people can only be 
accurately measured by their ideals and prin- 
ciples acquired through individual instruction 
and social training so that their happiness, 
efficiency and capacity for social service may be 
lurthered, developed and strengthened. 

Education Is Preparation for Life. 

Education as a preparation for life should 
primarily aim to give every individual proper 
control over his physical and mental powers. 
Then he should be taught and inspired how 
to use these powers to the best advantage for 
himself and for society. 

Education should also be directed to enable 
every individual to develop all his latent special 
and general powers. The results would net 
society untold advantages because it would 
broaden the public vision. Greater insight and 
mental penetration would follow as a matter of 
course and the increased public fund of infor- 
mation could be better applied in a greater 
range of problems affecting life and work. 

The whole problem of progress is fundamen- 
tally an educational function. 

The problems which will face us in the future 
will test the ability of our citizens even if 
they arc all equipped with the best education 
our schools can afford. Within our Republic 
every individual should possess the rudiments 
of an education upon which he can train him- 
self to a higher education, — if for any cause he 
has been denied other opportunities. 

The recent startling disclosures that 700,000 
men liable to military service, can neither read 
nor write, and that 1,500,000 illiterate native 
horn white persons were reported in the 1910 
census, is not only a serious reflection upon our 
lack of foresight, but it constitutes a positive 
menace to our institutions. Unfortunately, these 
disclosures arc only part of the truth. The 1910 
census report says that there were on that date, 
.5.516,163 persons over ten years of age in the 
United States who could neither read nor write 
in any language. 

If opportunity for the rudiments of an edu- 
cation has been denied these illiterates, or if 



educational opportunity is withheld from the 
least among our people, nothing less than a 
crime is being committed against our Republic. 

Criticism Alone a Poor Remedy. 

It will avail us nothing, however, merely to 
call attention to those shortcomings We must 
face the facts and correct the errors. As a 
people, we must assume our own responsi- 
bilities and not seek to place blame where it 
does not properly belong. In our moments of 
impatience we are prone to criticize our schools, 
altogether too harshly. Some even enjoy quoting 
Mark Twain when he jokingly said: 

"In the first place God made idiots. This 
was for practice. Then he made School Boards." 

Why Mark shot his bolt at School Boards 
and not at the labor unions or employers' or- 
ganizations has never seemed quite clear. Prob- 
ably be considered it more popular to strike at 
those who could not or would not strike back. 

If wc must criticize, let us be sure of our 
ground, if we refuse to bear our responsibilities 
as a people and must level our satire at a 
group, then let us hit the bull's-eye and place 
the principal blame for the defects in our edu- 
cational system upon that group in society 
which is primarily responsible for the creation 
of our free schools and our public school sys- 
tem. That group is the labor group. 

About a hundred years ago the organized 
wage earners of the New England States made 
a bitter protest against oft-repeated phrases by 
public speakers who preached the doctrine that: 

"Equality among men results only from edu- 
cation; the educated man is a good citizen, the 
uneducated an undesirable member of society. 
The uneducated must ever remain in a de- 
graded caste." 

Continual repetition of such gibes greatly 
disturbed the souls of the illiterate sons of the 
new Democracy who had fought so hard to 
establish these free and independent United 
States. The shafts of ridicule and contempt 
had their effect. Free, equal, practical, repub- 
lican education became the slogan of the manual 
toilers. 

At a specially called mass meeting of working 
men in New York, November, 1829, this resolu- 
tion was adopted: 

"Resolved, that the most grievous species 
of inequality is that produced by inequality in 
education. A national system of education and 
guardianship which shall furnish to all children 
of the land equal instruction at public expense 
is the only effectual remedy for this and for 
almost every other species of injustice. 
The Greatest of All Reforms. 

"Resolved, that all other modes of reform are, 
compared to this particular, inefficient and 
trifling." 

No better argument has ever been made to 
support our subject that "Education is prepara- 
tion for life." From this small beginning our 
free public schools have developed. Labor 
created the institution, fostered and protected 
it in many struggles. Labor has created public 
sentiment in behalf of compulsory education 
laws, free text-books, and vocational education, 
but, notwithstanding these activities, Labor has 



neglected the personal touch and the neighborly 
acquaintance which should be maintained with 
the teachers, so the teachers themselves can 
continue their education and develop their fund 
of new knowledge necessary for the preparation 
and maintenance of the life of their pupils. 
Labor should not forget its child, neither should 
the teachers ignore or forget the potential power 
of Labor. 

Laborers, teachers and employers should get 
together and work for the common good. 
Sometimes we blindly boast of our schools, 
public and private; richly endowed colleges and 
State universities; but, we have not yet become 
properly enthused with the functions of either, 
neither have we yet reached what the French 
call "the grand passion for education," and we 
never will until we collectively come to the 
point where every normal boy and girl in our 
land, under the age of sixteen, will be com- 
pulsorily kept in contact with the school and 
properly trained for such a preparation for life 
which will be most suitable to their capacity 
and disposition. 

The old world, as we formerly knew it, 
passed away in the fatal days of July, 1914, 
when the most sacred treaty obligations were 
violated by Germany. 

The Old World and the New. 

Up to that time we were governed more by 
the dead than by the living. Dead men in- 
spired us; dead opinions held us in leash; dead 
visions and dead practices stunted our growth. 

We are now living in a new world. The 
dead past can never return. We will never 
again accept, without critical examination, old 
ideals, old practices or old principles simply 
because they were old and had served the gen- 
erations which have passed. 

It is hoped that we will be equally critical 
and analytical of new methods and new prin- 
ciples, and steel ourselves against accepting 
every new proposition, simply because such 
propositions are new. 

One of the most aggressive publications I 
ever read, carried this novel card on every issue: 

"Read not to believe, read not to dispute, but 
carefully analyze and personally consider." 

Such advice if heeded builds self reliance, 
more independence, better citizenship. 

On March 20, of this year, our wonderfully 
gifted Chief Magistrate was credited with ex- 
pressing, in his most convincing and scholarly 
style, a timely warning and inspiring exhorta- 
tion. 

In a letter to his New Jersey friends, he 
wrote: 

"A time of grave crisis has come in our lives. 
. . . Every sign of these terrible days of war 
and revolutionary change, when economic and 
social forces are being released upon the world 
whose effect no political seer dare venture to 
conjecture, bids us search our hearts through 
and through and make them ready for the 
birth of a new day — a day, we hope and be- 
lieve, of greater opportunity and greater pros- 
perity for the average mass of struggling men 
and women, — and of greater safety and oppor- 
tunity for our children. . . 

The men in the trenches who have been 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



freed from the economic serfdom to which some 
of them hail been accustomed, will, it is likely, 
return to their homes with a new view and a 
new impatience of all mere political phrases, 
and will demand real thinking and sincere 
action." 

I venture to say that search as we might 
through the pages of ancient or contemporan- 
eous history we would never find any leader of 
nun uttering such a clarion call to heed the 
signs of a new time, a new freedom, a new 
world. 

The President's Soul-Inspiring Words. 

Hope, sympathy and action dominate every 
syllable of our President's expression. He is 
li oking forward, and bids us look forward. 

W'.-. vision is clear, he looks upward, and in- 
spires us to look upward. 

II does more. He peers farther, wider, 
deeper than any previous prince, potentate or 
president of past or present generations of 
men ever had the intelligence or the disposition 
to venture; he looks inward, first into his own 
heart and then he urges us in words so tender 
but so compelling to "search our own hearts" 
not casually, but thoroughly. ''Through and 
through," he says, and then he adds this as a 
climax, "make our hearts ready for the birth of 
a new day, — a day of greater opportunity and 
greater prosperity for the average mass of 
struggling men, women and children." 

Truly a magnificent lesson from a great 
teacher. These hopeful soul-inspiring words of 
Woodrow Wilson, will live as long as men in- 
habit the earth, and for ages they will be used 
in combination with the Sermon on the Mount, 
and Lincoln's masterpiece at Gettysburg. 

To whom may we suppose was he speaking — 
to the few selected representatives at Newark? 
No! He was speaking to all of our hundred 
million American neighbors and fellow citi- 
zen-., and especially to you, members of the 
National Education Association; you, responsible 
teachers and leaders in your own States and 
several communities. 

He undoubtedly hoped his words should 
find a ready welcome in the hearts and minds 
of our captains of industry. 

The nun and women engaged at manual labor 
whose burdens in the past have been the hardest 
to bear, will respond, with a will, to the task of 
getting ready for the birth of a new day. 

Pay heed especially to his encouraging 
promise that a new education, as a preparation 
and maintenance of life, is now in the making, 
not merely an education for children, but an 
education for full grown men, — our heroes re- 
turning from the front. 

Listen, you educators, you employers, you 
business men, you merchants, you trade union- 
ists, you public servants, here is the warning 
and here is the hope: 

"Men in the trenches freed from economic 
serfdom to which some of them had been 
accustomed, will return to their homes with a 
new view and a new impatience of all mere 
political phrases, and will demand real thinking 
and sincere action." 

Many earnest, private citizens have indulged 
in this thought and hope, but no one ever 
phrased it so completely, and loaded it with so 
much dynamic energy as did the President. 

The excerpts from this letter contain the 
jary inspiration we have been seeking. 
They show the way out. They point to the 
path ahead. They urge us to action, to make 
this world a brighter and happier dwelling 
place. 

During our existence as a nation, the Ameri- 
can people have quickly and enthusiastically re- 
sponded to a real leader who held aloft ideals 
of a broader education, and a purer democracy. 

Now that the nation's problems and the 
world's problems loom larger, our President 
calmly but specifically calls our attention to the 
new problems and the new duties ahead. 

If we heed the lesson as wc should we will 
commence to overhaul our whole system of 
education, commencing with the homes and the 
• ols. 

If we possess the intelligence we boast of 
we will display a discriminating taste. We will 
discard and throw into the scrap heap the 
outgrown dead things and dead practices, to 
which we have been so partisan. 

The Greatest Public Investment. 

We will save and improve old ideals that are 
proven to be worth while; we will rebuild and 
readjust our educational machinery; we will 
burnish it up and make it attractive; we will 
brush away the cobwebs of mystery and con- 
tusion; we will remove doubts, fears and in- 
junctions; we will remove unnecessary and un- 
American restraints: we will learn the difference 
between economy and stinginess; we will gen- 
eralize before we specialize; we will distinguish 
between civility and servility; we will be affirm- 
ative, positive, aggressive and generous, rather 
than cautious, timid, docjle and negative. 

( Hir homes, schools, shops, stores, factories, 
will become educational centers of greater value 
than ever before. Real practical, valuable edu- 
cation, fitting each person for a greater enjoy- 
ment of life, and a greater participation in 
public affairs will be the rule instead of the 
exception. 

Education for the mass instead of the class 
will be our motto. The bed rock foundations of 
society will be made secure before the super- 
structure is erected. 



Manual toil will be given equal credits with 
brain labor. The hard laborious task is en- 
titled to equal consideration with the pleasant 
berths of physical ease. 

Every active element of society will partici- 
pate with educators in the administration of all 
our schools, especially in the elementary, second- 
ary anil high school grades. 

In every community and State, labor men, 
business men and medical men will be called 
into counsel to encourage and assist in solving 
the difficult tasks confronting our loyal pains- 
taking educators. 

Too long, far too long have the school 
teachers been left to their own resources, public 
confidence in them has been carried to a foolish 
extreme, as a consequence each element has 
suffered, first, because they did not know each 
other, and second, because there has been no 
common understanding among them. 

Freer thought and freer expression will be the 
outcome. These functions are the very essence 
of democracy. 

The right to complain, criticize and find fault 
must be equally safeguarded with the right to 
approve and praise. 

No longer shall we look admiringly on an 
individual or a class that shows evidence of 
being merely automatic, nodding affirmatives. 

We want to know what is wrong as well as 
what is right. The only way to find out, is to 
cut the Gordian Knots of silence, false re- 
t, and humble docility. 

When wc start in earnest to provide real 
education, to be a real preparation for life, we 
must first provide the means; more school 
revenue must be forthcoming. We cannot get 
something for nothing. Up to the present our 
educational funds have been too meager. 

All our educational work must be under pub- 
lic auspices, and at public expense. When the 
public knows the advantages for better prepara- 
tion and maintenance of life through better and 
broader education, the public will open its 
pockets and generously provide the wherewithal. 
It may happen that the bed-rock of all wealth 
may be tapped. A reasonable tax on rental 
value of all land would furnish the safest foun- 
dation for educational purposes. Land values 
are created by the presence and activities of all 
the people — it should follow as an axiom that 
all the people should share in the values they 
create. The share they are entitled to should 
be expended first in educational work. 

Brushing Away the Cobwebs. 

Our public schools constitute one of the 
greatest public investments. Several hundred 
millions are invested in buildings alone. These 
buildings should be used more generally for 
adult and community education and welfare. 

Make the schools open forums to all the 
people and the greatest single advance will be 
made for greater popularity of our educators 
and our educational institutions. 

Once this step is taken, the public will realize 
that our school teachers are being mistreated, 
and that their wages are wholly insufficient. 

No generation in the history of our country 
has shown more patriotism and loyalty than the 
present generation, educated almost wholly in 
our public schools. 

Much of this credit is due to our splendid 
corps of teachers in the graded schools. They 
have certainly done their work well. They have 
earned their pay many times over. No group 
has helped more to "make the world safe for 
democracy" than have our school teachers. 

School teachers deserve a raise in wages — a 
good substantial raise, — over one hundred per 
cent, raise in many localities. The minimum 
wage base that has been popularized by trade 
unionists and which has been so effective in 
protecting the interests of our skilled and un- 
skilled manual toilers should be intelligently ap- 
plied to the method of paying teachers' wages 
or salaries. 

Nothing less than $1200 per year will be 
adequate or just as a minimum rate for our 
teachers. It can never be secured by teachers, 
as units, or by individual effort; they must learn 
how to organize and protect their trade, occu- 
pational or professional interests like other 
people; they must combat opposition; they must 
first learn how they may collectively stand upon 
their own feet and depend upon their own re- 
sources. Then, they must demand a voice in 
the management of the schools of their com- 
munity, so they can more generously contribute 
from their knowledge and experience for the 
benefit of the schools. If representative manage- 
ment of schools is to be a success, the teachers 
must have a full voice. In addition they should 
study the methods of other elements in society 
by association and federation. The right to so 
organize and federate must be held inviolate 
for school teachers as well as for doctors, law- 
yers, mechanics and laborers. When these new 
activities are established success will follow and 
long deferred justice will be won for our 
teachers. 

These first steps must be taken before edu- 
cators can move freely and smoothly along 
lines of the new endeavors required for the 
birth of a new day, and before the body politic 
can obtain the advantages of a real genuine 
education, which will prepare and enable them 
to properly maintain life. 

So far as it goes our educational system is all 
right, but it does not go far enough or deep 



enough. It is still a long distance from simon 
pure democracy and will be until we realize 
that education is not expected or intended to be 
a luxury for a superior child, or an exceptional 
child, or a well-to-do child to bask in. Edu- 
cation, to be democratic and to properly equip 
for life, must be free as the air wc breathe, 
for every mother's boy and girl, everyone "of 
the least of these, my brethren," black or white, 
rich or poor, bright or dull. 

Our future bricklayers, carpenters, plumbers 
and blacksmiths need as much care and as much 
preparation for life as our future doctors, law- 
yers, preachers and teachers. 

This great bread and butter question, politely 
called the economic problem, is the impelling 
force that will drive us to a new brand of 
democracy which will be safe for us and safe 
for the world, a democracy that means not 
only universal liberty, but, universal organiza- 
tion that will guarantee equal opportunities and 
equal justice to all. 



SOLDIER AND SAILOR INSURANCE. 



Every American soldier or sailor lost on 
the torpedoed transport "Tuscania" was 
protected by the L T nited States Government 
insurance and Government compensation. 
This has been officially announced by Sec- 
retary McAdoo. 

Those who had not applied for insurance 
were covered by the automatic insurance 
under the law which is payable to a wife, 
child or widowed mother. This automatic 
insurance aggregates $4300, netting $25 a 
month for 240 months. 

Of those who had applied for and ob- 
tained insurance many had taken out the 
maximum amount of $10,000, netting $57.50 
a month for 240 months. 

There have been various causes for delay 
in forwarding checks to the dependents of 
soldiers and sailors. 

The distance of many of the applicants 
from Washington and the mail congestion 
prevailing more or less all over the coun- 
try have caused delay both in the receipt 
of the applications by the Treasury and 
the receipt of the checks by the bene- 
ficiaries. 

Another cause is that, of the checks sent 
out — 10,000 could not be delivered because 
the dependents to whom the checks were 
payable had moved, leaving no forwarding 
addresses or the addresses originally given 
were incomplete or erroneous or so illegi- 
bly written that they could not be properly 
deciphered. 

Nearly 500,000 checks were mailed out 
in January and all possible expedition is 
being made to get all the addresses and 
other details correct so that the depend- 
ents of the soldiers and sailors will receive 
their allowances promptly and certainly. — 
U. S. Treasury Department Bulletin. 



SAVING AND SERVING. 



By economizing in consumption and 
with the resultant saving purchasing the 
Government's war securities the American 
citizen performs a double duty. The citi- 
zen and the Government can not use the 
same labor and material; if the citizen 
uses its, the material and the labor can 
not be used by the Government. If the 
citizen economizes in consumption, so much 
material and labor and transportation space 
is left free for Government uses. And 
when the saving effected is lent to the 
Government more money is thus placed at 
the disposal of the Government. 

The more the people save the more 
money, labor, and materials are left for 
the winning of the war, the greater and 
more complete the support given to our 
fighting men. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed bv American Federation of Labor 



Lost Traveling Time Paid by Employers. 

The National War Labor Board has ruled 
that employes of the National Refining Com- 
pany, Coffeyville, Kan., shall be paid for the 
time spent in traveling to and from the dif- 
ferent oil fields, with overtime rates where 
they either work or travel in excess of eight 
hours, together with all of their expenses. 

This is the first time the Hoard has made 
an award of this character. The basic eight- 
hour day is established, as is machinery for 
the speedy adjustment of future differences. 

The award embraces numerous sanitary 
requirements in the oil fields, including 
drinking fountains, toilets, lockers and bath- 
ing facilities. Wherever practicable all 
strikers shall be given preference in employ- 
ment, seniority rights are secured and mem- 
bership in a union shall no longer be a 
cause for dismissal or a bar to employment. 

Joint Chairman Frank P. Walsh makes 
this comment on the award : 

"This is the first constructive effort on 
the part of the Government to stabilize la- 
bor conditions in the mid-continent oil field, 
where the relations of the workers and em- 
ployers up to this time have been charac- 
terized by innumerable difficulties and linger- 
ing antagonisms. In some parts of the im- 
mense field feeling has run so high that ku 
klux klans were organized, lynching parties 
formed, alleged I. W. W.'s and others tarred 
and feathered, charges and counter charges 
of sabotage and other destructive practices 
made by both the workers and the employers. 
The mid-continent field produces 65 per cent. 
of all the gasoline content oil in the country 
and the total production is staggering in 
volume and value. The production of oil 
lies at the very base of the military and 
naval program of the Government, and the 
perpetuation of unrest in the mid-continent 
field could not but have a detrimental effect 
upon oil production." 



Santa Fe Shop Men Unite. 

The convention of shop men employed 
by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Rail- 
road, to organize a system federation and 
district lodges, marks a changed policy 
on this railroad, starting with Director 
General of Railroads McAdoo's general 
order No. 8, last February, that : 

"No discrimination will be made in the 
employment, retention or conditions of em- 
ployment of employes because of member- 
ship or non-membership in labor organiza- 
tions." 

Before Government control of railroads, 
the Santa Fe was bitter in its opposition 
to organized labor. Several years ago. and 
before railroad shop men had perfected 
their present system of federation, the ma- 
chinists were defeated after a long strike. 

During the present agitation for a sys- 
tem federation the company attempted to 
block this movement by discharging em- 
ployes, but they were reinstated through 
the Federal Department of Labor. 

A peculiar feature of the Santa Fe's op- 
position to trade unionism is the early ex- 
pressed opinion of its executive — President 
Ripley — regarding Government ownership 
of railroads. He was one of the first rail- 
road officials to acknowledge that this was 



inevitable. He has failed, however, to 
acknowledge that the recognition of trade 
unionism is inevitable. Now he is helpless 
as he sees the Santa Fe controlled by a 
Government that notifies shop men they 
have the right to join with their fellows, 
and that they will be protected if they 
take such action. 



Labor Board's Award Rejected by Bosses. 

The Smith & Wesson Arms Company 
of Springfield, Mass., is in favor of this 
Government's war against autocracy, but 
it opposes Uncle Sam's efforts to extend 
democracy at home. 

The company has refused to accept the 
award of the National War Labor Board, 
which ordered it to recognize collective 
bargaining, abandon its individual contract 
system and reinstate victimized trade un- 
ionists. The company has notified the 
War Department that it can take over its 
plant. Under the law the Government can 
commandeer this or any other plant, re- 
gardless of the company's wishes. 

The Machinists' Union has been con- 
ducting a successful organizing campaign 
among the 1,200 men and women employes 
of Smith & Wesson. Prior to this these 
employes were compelled to buy their own 
tools, oil, waste, and even ice. 

To more effectively oppose trade union- 
ism the company forced individual con- 
tracts on employes, who were discharged 
as fast as it was found that they had af- 
filiated with organized labor. ( )n this 
question the National War Labor Board 
ruled : 

"The practice of the company in times 
past to take restrictive personal contracts, 
even if lawful when made, is contrary to 
the principles of the National War Labor 
Board, and the practice of taking such 
contracts should be discontinued during 
the period of the war." 

To enforce this decision, and to assure 
workers of their right to bargain collec- 
tively, the Board assigned representatives 
to see that its award was complied with. 

This was too much for these patriotic 
gentlemen, who shriek against the Kaiser's 
autocracv. 



Boys to be Educated at Nation's Expense. 

The Government has arranged with 
more than 300 colleges to continue the 
education of boys before they are called 
to the army. Military training, under an 
army officer, will be a part of the educa- 
tional system of these colleges. The boys 
must be 18 years and over and will be 
considered as soldiers on active duty. 
They will be under military discipline, re- 
ceive the pay of privates, and their tuition, 
clothing and sustenance will be provided 
by the Government. 

All boys who are sufficiently educated 
to pass the entrance examination of any 
of these colleges may become members of 
the students' army training corps. 

Where boys have only received a gram- 
mar schooling and cannot pass the college 
examination, they may receive vocational 
training. 

(Continued on Pag^ 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 

International Seamen's Union of America, 328- 
332 West Randolph St., Chicago, I1L 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 
Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes des France, 33 Rue Grange 
aux-Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord, 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fryboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundt, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten 1 B., Sweden. 
DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade 15, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zecmansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhavn 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nationale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina IS, Austria. 

SPAIN. 

Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Ccntro Maritimo des Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 35S Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's Workers 



In an address at Washington Mrs. 
Howard Ilannaford, wife of a mis- 
sionary in Japan, stated that girls 
12 years of age worked ten and 
twelve hours a day in that country. 
The speaker emphasized the need for 
legislation in Japan to correct this 
evil. 

Reynolds's Newspaper of London, 
England, opposes the plan for the 
Government to abandon its ship 
yards and turn this industry over to 
private management. In support of 
this position, the editor says: "There 
has not been one strike in the royal 
yards during the war." 

According to dispatches from 
Amsterdam a woman has been 
elected to the Dutch Parliament. J he- 
successful candidate is Miss Groven- 
weg, who was on the Socialist Labor 
ticket. Under the revised constitu- 
tion of Holland women are eligible 
to seats in Parliament and Miss 
Grovenweg was one of twenty 
women who contested for election. 

The British Government has ac- 
cepted the demands of 22,000 striking 
policemen, who have secured wage 
increases and the reinstatement of a 
London policeman who was dis- 
charged because of his activities in 
the organization of the policemen's 
union. The Government has recog- 
nized the National Union of Police 
and Prison Officers as a "federation," 
but not as a trade union. 

The House of Commons has passed 
on third and final reading the edu- 
cation bill introduced last year, which 
will limit child labor. The bill is ex- 
pected to bring about many changes 
in the educational system of Eng- 
land, since it provides for nursery 
schools for children under 5 years of 
age and compels attendance at school 
of all between 5 and 14. It also for- 
bids the employment for profit of 
any child under 12. 

A notice calling up all the Serbian 
male population between the ages of 
17 and 55 has been published in the 
newspapers of Belgrade, according to 
a Serbian source of information com- 
municated to the Department of La- 
bor. This is interpreted to mean the 
collective forced recruiting for the 
purpose of harvesting for the Austro- 
llungarian military stores. Announce- 
ment was made July 28 that all 
persons of both sexes between the 
ages of 11 and 60 would be con- 
sidered as liable to be called to 
work. 

Street car men of Ottawa, Canada, 
have won their appeal against an 
arbitration award under the Canadian 
"can't-strike" law, and wages have 
been increased over those granted 
by the arbitration board. This case 
is the first to be considered by the 
new appeal board, consisting of rep- 
resentatives of the government, 
workers and employes, which will 
review the findings of arbitration 
boards, if either party is dissatis- 
fied. Objection has been made to 
the "can't-strike" law because of de- 
lays that employers have taken ad- 
vantage of. When the street car 
men asked that the appeal board 
review their case, they were notified 
by the Government that such action 
would be taken "within 10 days." 
This sounded like the old story and 
the men suspended work. The work- 
ers were then notified that the board 
would consider the matter "immedi- 
ately." The men returned to work 
and the question was settled in rec- 
ord time. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M. BROWN & SONS 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florshcim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



LIPPMAN'S 

Head to Foot Clothiers for Men 

Fourteen Years in San Pedro 



532 Beacon Street 

531 Front Street 

Two Entrances 



FRERICHS NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

529/ 2 BEACON STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

Seafaring people who desire to take up navigation, San Pedro, situated In the sunny 
south Is the Ideal place. Captain Frerlchs has established a Navigation School here 
and under his undivided personal supervision students will be thoroughly prepared 
to pass successfully before the United States Steamboat Inspectors. 

TERMS ARE REASONABLE 



The Anglo 




Trust Company 



As successors to the SWEDISH-AMERICAN BANK 
offers a particularly convenient service to 

SEA FARING MEN and to the SCANDINAVIAN PEOPLE 

in California 

ANGLO-CALIFORNIA TRUST CO. 

Main Office: Northeast Cor. MARKET and SANSOME STREETS 

BRANCHES: 

16th and Mission Streets Fillmore and Geary Streets 

Third and Twentieth Streets 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $ 1,910,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 17,000,000 

COMMERCIAL SAVINGS TRUST 



SATISFIED CUSTOMERS ARE OUR 
BEST ADVERTISERS 

S. G. SWANSON 

Established 19U4 
For the BEST there Is In TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2a Floor, BanKot San Pedro, 110 W 6th St. 
ban Pedro, Los Angeles waterfront, Cal. 



NOTICE. 

The following named members, in 
order to comply with the military 
regulations, should at once call or 
write to the Sailors' Union office 
for their questionnaire: 



Aalta, Albert 
Aalta, nenry E. 
Abranamson, A. W. 
Anaras, lkmari 
Anderson, Sven 
Aries, Frank 
Axelsen. J. H. 
Baardsen, Hans M. 
Bergstrom, John E. 
Bowma, Jan 
Brandt, Blrger 
Burg, John 
Byglin. O. O. 
Carlsen. H. C. 
Carlson, Einar G. 
Castro, Julian F. 
Eliasson, J. E. 
Ellison, Morris 
Falvik, Carl E. 
Forssell, Carl A. 
Gardner, Edmund 
Greenitz. John 
Gumdeross. 11. C. 
Hansen. Johannsen 
Hansen, B. P. A. 
Hennrikson, Henry 
Hermann, Carl E. 
Jacobson, Malt 
ii, Bernh. 
Jensen, Frank 
Jensen, Henry 
Johnsen, Carl G. 
Kilslrom, Dom 
Lehtlnan. Ernest E. 
Loine. Frank I>. 
Ludwlg. Nils H. 



Lundstrom. E. \V. 
Lund. John A. 
Maki, Malt 
Makla, Anden 
Matliiesen, Axel 
Nlelson, Hans 
Ailsson, Mils II. 
Odenberg, Adolph 
Olsen, Nlcolal 
Olsen. Claio 
Olsen, Emli 
Olsen. Mandius 
Olsen, Angar M. 
Olsen, Kagnar 
Olson. Knut 
Ostergard, Frank 
Pederson, C. E. 
Peterson, Conrad 
Pettersen, Einar E. 
Rasmussen. R. H. 
Rasmussen, 1.. A. 
Rod, Sakarias 
Roed, Hjalmar 
Roffer, Jack 
Rontved. O. J. 
Schellenz, Charles 
Schlppman, H. C. 
Schuldt. Theodore 
Slge, Herman 
Strasdin, Paul 
Tanum, Helga 
Wall, Alfred 
Wamser, Christian 
Wilcke. J. W. G. 
Wllhelmson, John 
Zwart, A. 



CUT THIS OUT! 

and send It with 25c and receive by re- 
turn mail Regular Dollar Size Package 
of our Famous Egyptian Beauty Cream, 

CREMONILE 
A Beauty Builder of Highest Order. 
You will be moie than delighted with 
the result. 

S. J. CHURCHILL CHEMICAL CO., 
Beaumont, Texas 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention The Sea- 
men's Journal. 




CditKwfldgeDecsives 

=but only at long range. 

If you buy a $50 Liberty Bond when you can afford a $1000 
Bond, your conscience will remind you for the rest of your 
life that you have helped THE BOCHE. 



Buy Fourth Liberty Bonds 

Any Bank Will Help You 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



The Kiernan & Kern Shipyard, Portland, Ore., 
has received a Government contract for four 
wooden steamers, each to have capacity of 4500 
tons and costing $2,600,000. The plant will be 
increased from two to four ways. 

The San Diego Marine Corporation, San 
Diego, Cal., is being organized to operate the 
new Government shipbuilding works to be lo- 
cated at that point. The works will include 
machine shops, forge shops, pipe works, erect- 
ing shops, and administration structures. The 
initial plant will consist of twelve buildings 
estimated to cost over $5,000,000. 

The Sundry Civil Bill for 1919 carries an ap- 
propriation for a new vessel for the Coast and 
Geodetic Survey Service, to cost not over $354,- 
000; a motor-driven vessel to take the place of 
the Taku, condemned as unscaworthy and sold 
some time since; also, for more launches, in- 
cluding their equipment. These vessels are much 
needed for survey in Alaskan waters. 

J. H. Hansen, president of the Skandia-Pacific 
Oil Engine Co., which has offices in San 
Francisco and a plant in Oakland, returned 
from Philadelphia recently with a contract for 
twenty Diesel engines, to cost $2,500,000. Each 
engine will develop in excess of 1100 horse- 
power, and will be fitted in fabricated steel ships 
of the Emergency Fleet Corporation. 

Five new buildings that will double the present 
capacity of the United States Marine Hospital 
at Fourteenth avenue and Lake street will be 
erected at once, it was announced recently. 
Provisions of the eight-hour law for work on 
Government contracts have been suspended and 
the buildings will be rushed to completion. The 
hospital will care for 300 patients. The cost of 
the new buildings and improvements will amount 
to about $275,000. 

Eight wooden steamers a month hereafter will 
be delivered to the Government, ready for sea 
service, from the Portland and Columbia Dis- 
trict, according to the program mapped out by 
T. B. Morris, chief of machinery and installation 
for the Emergency Fleet Corporation at Port- 
land, Ore. Seventy-three wooden hulls, on a 
recent date, were in process of being equipped 
with engines, boilers and other gear in the dis- 
trict. 

Six additional contracts for the construction 
of Ferris type ships for the Emergency Fleet 
Corporation have been awarded to the Seaborn 
Shipvards Company at Tacoma, making a total 
of fourteen. Seven of the fourteen ships con- 
tracted for have been launched, two of which 
are in service and two more soon will be de- 
livered to the Government. Contracts for two 
more Ferris ships recently were awarded to the 
Wright Shipyards Company at Tacoma. 

One of the Pacific Mail steamers operating 
between a Pacific Coast port and the Orient was 
caught in the same typhoon that caused the 
sinking of the schooner "Ethel Zane," accord- 
ing to the statement of Captain A. W. Nelson 
when his command arrived at a Pacific port. 
"It was the worst typhoon of my experience," 
said the captain. "I have made 166 voyages 
across the Pacific as commander of a Pacific 
Mail liner, but, despite numerous terrific gales, 
none could compare with this one." 

J. J. Dwyer, former president of the State 
Board of Harbor Commissioners, has taken up 
his duties as harbor development expert of the 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. Chamber 
of Commerce officials say Dwyer is well quali- 
fied to work out a program for the expansion 
of the facilities of the harbor. General Manager 
Robert Newton Lynch of the Chamber of 
Commerce said the Chamber of Commerce is 
co-operating with the Harbor Board and the 
Federal Shipping Board in adapting the facilities 
of the harbor to the growing commerce. 

A. Mcrritt Taylor, director of passenger trans- 
portation and housing for the Emergency Fleet 
Corporation, arrived at San Francisco from 
Seattle during the week and will investigate the 
needs of the local shipbuilding plants. In order 
to make it more convenient for the workmen to 
get to and from the various plants, Taylor 
may suggest that changes he made in the 
transportation facilities about the bay. He will 
also investigate the housing facilities and, if 
necessary, the corporation may assist in the 
work of constructing additional homes for the 
men. 

The observance of .Sunday as a day of rest, 
rather than one of work, in the shipyards, is 
encouraged bv Vice-President Howard Coonley, 
F.mererency Fleet Corporation, in a special order. 
The Vice-President says that work should not 
be done on Sunday except in cases of emergency 
or to complete special and necessary work, and 
the Corporation therefore expects the Sabbath to 
be as free from work as circumstances will 
reasonably permit. For such work as is per- 
formed on Sunday, the rates of pay authorized 
in the decisions of the Shipbuilding Labor Ad- 
justment Board are to prevail. 

During the past week Skinner & Edily, Seattle 
shipbuilders, launched the thirtieth vessel from 
the ways of their No. 1 yard and the sixteenth 
direct contract ship for the Emergency Fleet. 
The vessel was the "West Lashaway," built in 



fifty-five working days from keel laying, bring- 
ing this plant's average hull construction time 
for the last ten ships to less than fifty-three 
days. The remaining four vessels of the original 
twenty contracted for by the Shipping Board are 
well under way, as are five hulls of the new 
contract for fifty ships, one of the latter being 
for the new type of 9600-ton vessel to be 
built by this plant. 

The salmon pack for the season of 1918 will 
be bigger than that of a year ago, according to 
advices received during the past week, when one 
of the steamers belonging to the Bristol Bay 
Packing Company arrived at a Pacific Coast 
port with a full cargo of canned fish and 200 
cannery hands. The salmon ran well and the 
ice jam of the early season failed to inter- 
fere with the business. During the voyage of 
the vessel down, one of the machinists on board 
committed suicide by cutting his throat and then 
leaping overboard. He had about $1300 coming, 
and this will be paid to his relatives. It was 
also reported that a Chinese and' one other 
cannery hand committed suicide during the 
voyage north and at «the cannery. 

The division of operations of the United 
States Shipping Board has already commenced 
an investigation into the coal bunkering facilities 
of the Pacific Coast was announced during the 
week. Director of Operations John H. Rosseter 
has appointed James B. Smith, president of the 
King Coal Company, to conduct a special in- 
vestigation into the conditions obtaining at Port- 
land and Smith is now making a survey of the 
Columbia River district. Rosseter intends to create 
every possible facility for shipping that may be 
needed at all ports and especially on the Pacific 
Coast. The chief being thoroughly familiar with 
the local conditions and the needs of the ship- 
pers, in addition to the additional needs of the 
Government, is expected to have all of the local 
ports better prepared to handle the traffic prob- 
lems than ever before. Before leaving for Wash- 
ington Rosseter said that as time is the essence 
of all things maritime it is essential that every 
facility be provided for the fast dispatch of 
vessels in port. Coal bunkering is one of the 
prime essentials and in the past there have 
been certain delays at times owing to the lack 
of proper facilities at some of the ports. The 
new shipping chief of the biggest merchant 
fleet in the world said recently that if the pro- 
gram of handling vessels in the various ports 
can be facilitated a certain per cent, it would be 
equal to increasing the tonnage of the American 
mercantile marine. 

Plans for the construction of San Francisco 
harbor improvements to cost more than $500,000 
were approved by the Board of State Harbor 
Commissioners during the past week. The prin- 
cipal improvement consists of a huge pier to 
replace No. 1 immediately north of the Ferry 
building. Another is an extension to and re- 
building of pier 43 at the foot of Lombard 
street. Pier 1, which will be 600 feet long, 138 
feet in width and covered with a fireproof shed, 
will be supported by a reinforced concrete sub- 
structure and will constitute a second unit of 
the twin river steamer terminal, which will be 
used by the California Transportaton Company 
and the California Navigation . and Improvement 
Company. The pier will cost about $250,000 
and the shed $150,000. Pier 43 when completed 
will be 650 feet long and 167 feet in width. 
It will be used as an open terminal for lumber 
and other freight and will prevent congestion 
along the water front at North Beach. Bids for 
both piers will be advertised for in the near 
future. Plans and specifications for a second 
story to the back portion of the postoffice at the 
ferry were approved and bids will be advertised 
for. The cost will be about $20,000. This im- 
provement was made necessary on account of 
the increase in mail. Commissioner J. H. Mc- 
Callum said that with the improvements now 
under construction and others contemplated 
there would be no question of the ability of the 
State to care for all the commerce that may 
come to the port. Present facilities are capable 
of handling a considerable volume of business 
in excess of that existing. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone, Sutter 
5807. (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' 

FEDERATION. 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS: 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary 

1%A Lewis Street 

Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md ADOLF KILE, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 
NEW YORK CITY....GUSTAVE H. BROWN, Agent 

51 South Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa... OSCAR CHRISTIANSEN, Agt 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT, Va S. ALEXANDERSON, Agent 

123 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala CHARLES RAVING, Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La. .. .CHARLES HANSON, Agent 

400y 2 Fulton Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex GEO. SCHROEDER, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I CHAS. CLAUSEN, Agent 

27 Wickenden Street 



STLAS B. AXTELL, attorney for the Eastern 
& Gulf Sailors' Assn., Marine Cooks & Stewards' 
Association, Marine Firemen, Oilers & Water 
Tenders' Union, has moved his offices to the 
ground floor of the Washington Building, One 
Broadway, New York. Entrance room J, ground 
floor. Consultation and advice on all matters 
relating to enforcement of the Seamen's_ Act, 
claims for Compensation or damages, will be 
given free of charge as in the past, by Mr. 
Axtell and his expert assistants, Mr. Vernon S. 
Jones and Mr. Arthur Lavenburg. (Advt.) 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y 12 South Street 

H. P. GRIFFIN, President 

W. L. CARTLEDGE, Secretary-Treasurer 

Telephone Bowling Green 8840-8841 

New York Branch D. E. GRANGE, Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 

Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass J. A. MARTIN, Agent 

6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La R. T. KAIZER, Agent 

228 Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK, Va WM, QUINN, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS WM. J. SIGGERS, Agent 

127 Twenty-third Street 

BALTIMORE, Md A. KILE, Sub. Agent 

802-804 South Broadway 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa..O. CHRISTIANSEN, Sub. Agt. 

206 Moravian Street 

MOBILE, Ala C. RAVING, Sub. Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex...G. SCHROEDER, Sub. Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex J. CLAUSEN, Sub. Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 40 Burling Slip 

Telephone John 396 
New York Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 164 Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN, N. Y.: 110 Hamilton Avenue 

Branches: 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa 138 South Second Street 

BALTIMORE, Md 802 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va 127 Twenty-third Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex 132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex 221 20th Street 

BOSTON, Mass 196 Commercial Street 

NORFOLK, Va 513 East Main Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La 400»/ z Fulton Street 

MOBILE, Ala 104 S. Commerce Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. 1 27 Wickenden Street 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 

Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Agency: 

GLOUCESTER, Mass 163 Main Street 



LAKE DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, 111 324-332 West Randolph Street 

Telephone Franklin 278 
Branches and Agencies: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone Hanover 240. 

ASHTABULA, 85 Bridge Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762'. 

DETROIT, MICH 44 Shelby Street 

Telephone Cherry 342., 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

TOLEDO, 821 Summit Street 

(Continued on Page 11.) 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



The 


Seamen's 


Journal 


Published weekly at Sa 


n Francisco 




BY THE 




SAILORS* UNION OF THE PACIFIC 




Established in 


1887 



PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

S. A. SILVER Business Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - - $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To Insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
59 Clay Street. San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral Interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1918. 



THE QUESTIONNAIRE! 



Thousands upon thousands of Seamen will 
soon be called upon to answer a series of 
questions propounded by the Provost Marshal 
< reneral of the United States. 

When the Questionnaire is received it is 
necessary to act promptly. The various local 
boards must have these replies to proceed 
with an intelligent application of the Selective 
Service Law and Regulations. 

"Mariners actually employed in sea ser- 
vice"' will be exempted as heretofore upon 
filing proper claim and proof of such service. 

In addition to mariners "now actually em- 
ployed as such" there are thousands upon 
thousands of former seamen in various shore 
occupations. It is of the utmost importance 
that all former seamen should furnish the 
local draft boards with full information upon 
their sea-going experience and qualifications. 

Every man who has quit the sea but has 
served at sea a sufficient length of time to 
enable him at this time to qualify as able 
seaman, marine fireman, oiler or water-tender, 
marine cook, baker or butcher, should fully 
acquaint his draft board with such facts and 
data. 

The proper manning of our rapidly grow- 
ing Merchant Marine, but especially of the 
great fleet which is carrying supplies to Eu- 
rope, is of the utmost importance to Amer- 
ica and to the cause for which we are dedi- 
cating our man power. 

Our country's resource in this respect, 
i. c., the number of seamen actually avail- 
able for sea service, is likely to have a con- 
trolling influence on the future of all sea- 
men and is, as already stated, of most 
serious importance in bringing the war to 
an early and successful conclusion. 



The grandeur and greatness of a nation 
cannot rise above the average of its entire 
population, and nothing will ever bring 
America to the realization of ils full | 
bilities except effective organization of all 
real workers; and this includes the men at 
the bottom of the industrial heap: — the 
"common," migratory, or unskilled laborers. 



SEAMEN AND THE LIBERTY LOAN. 



When the history of the great war is writ- 
ten, the first, last and middle chapters will 
have to deal at length with the grim cour- 
age, unfailing daring, keen resourcefulness 
which has marked the high heroism of 
American seamen. 

Few suffered such quick misfortune as 
that steamship crew which recently sailed out 
of a French port in the morning and sailed 
back again that afternoon, on a destroyer 
which had rescued them from their torpe- 
doed craft. Thousands, however, faced death 
a second or third time from ships sent down 
beneath them and wasted neither time nor 
thought in manning other ships when port 
was reached. 

It is from these fresh proofs of the stam- 
ina of America's seafarers, though no proofs 
of its existence really were needed, that 
enthusiasm has mounted over the prospect 
of the American merchant flag's flying in 
every world port after the war. That our 
merchant marine was gaining no ground 
before the war was not the fault of our 
mariners, ship owners or merchants. Ameri- 
can foreign trade was growing, but foreign 
bottoms were carrying our products. 

Now the war has swept away the econ- 
omic factors which prevented the rebirth of 
our once ample merchant marine. Nearly 
900 ways in more than a hundred shipyards 
are working night and day to launch new 
ships, every one needed to carry on the war. 

While every patriot in every allied country 
is straining every nerve to win the war, a 
thousand plans for the turning of our new 
merchant fleet into trade channels are slowly 
maturing. 

Germany's plans have reached a more 
definite stage. Using no ships, except in 
the Baltic, to further her war ends, her mer- 
chant fleet held in port by allied supremacy 
on the sea, she is adding new merchant car- 
riers in a score of shipyards. Recent dis- 
patches from Amsterdam tell of the building 
of fleets of huge freighters and passenger 
liners, from 10,000 tons up to 20,000 and 
25,000 tons. And there is no doubt that 
Germany is preparing to make as hard a 
fight to regain her markets as she ever did 
to wipe out the last man of the French and 
British armies and lay waste London and 
Paris like she did Belgium. 

America's salvation lies in a fleet of ships 
which will leave no trade route open for 
German entry; a fleet which will make the 
American flag the most frequently met with 
on every sea ; a fleet which will carry not 
only American goods, but the world's goods 
to every port. 

American seamen will man these ships ; 
American shipyards will turn them out; 
American money will pay for them. 

Every American seafarer, from cabin boy 
to captain, can and must have a share in 
providing this money. A big share of the 
proceeds of the first three Liberty Loans has 
gone to American shipbuilders and American 
mariners. A bigger share of the fourth 
Liberty Loan will go to both, since the ship- 
yards are now turning out more than 500,- 
000 tons per month, and navigators must 
be provided for them. 

Tn these days of war risk wages, there is 
no seafarer, from cabin boy to captain, who 
cannot take a proud share in making a suc- 
cess of the fourth Liberty Loan. The cam- 
paign opens September 28 and closes Octo- 
ber 19, and in these three weeks America 
must roll up a more huge war fund than 



any one would have dreamed a few years 
could have been gathered by all the nations 
of the world. 

Between six and eight BILLION dollars 
is called for. 

This means that every man, woman and 
child in or of the United States, must buy 
Liberty Bonds to the last cent of his means. 
Excuses will not remove the menace of Ger- 
man competition after the war; sacrifices 
will. 

Do not leave port before September 28 
without having arranged to take your share 
of bonds. 



THE PRESIDENT'S SOUND ADVICE. 



The letter sent by President Wilson to the 
striking machinists and tool-makers in Bridge- 
port (Conn.) munition plants is a master- 
piece of diction and compelling logic. 

The Bridgeport workers struck because of 
dissatisfaction with the decision of an arbi- 
trator chosen under an agreement with the 
International Union of Machinists. Referring 
to this breach of faith, the President says: 

If such disregard of the solemn adjudication 
of a tribunal to which both parties submitted 
their claims be temporized with, agreements be- 
come mere scraps of paper. If errors creep 
into awards, the proper remedy is submission 
to the award with an application for rehearing 
to the tribunal. But to strike against the award 
is disloyalty and dishonor. 

The Smith & Wesson Company of Spring- 
field, engaged in Government work, has refused 
to accept the mediation of the National War 
Labor Board and has flaunted its refusal of the 
decision approved by Presidential proclamation. 
With ray consent, the War Department has 
taken over the plant and business of the com- 
pany to secure continuity in production and to 
prevent industrial disturbance. 

It is of the highest importance to secure com- 
pliance with reasonable rules and procedure for 
the settlement of industrial disputes. Having 
exercised a drastic remedy with recalcitrant era- 
ployers, it is my duty to use means equally 
well adapted to that end with lawless and faith- 
employes. 

Surely, this is language that leaves no 
doubt as to its meaning. And to the credit of 
the Bridgeport strikers it must be said that 
they promptly met the issue by returning to 
work and agreeing to take up their grievances 
in an orderly manner with the National War 
Labor Roard. 

During these epoch-making days America 
is, indeed, fortunate to have a man at the 
helm like President Wilson. 

But American labor is doubly fortunate. 
Since Lincoln's days the White House has 
not been occupied by a more trusted guide, 
dependable counseler and truer friend to all 
who toil. 



A NOTEWORTHY HEALTH RECORD. 



How well Uncle Sam takes care of the 
young men who are in training for service 
in the new Merchant Marine is strikingly 
illustrated by statistical data just made public. 

The health records on the Atlantic squad- 
ron of training ships maintained by the Uni- 
ted States Shipping Board, show only one 
death among 8.500 men in a period of seven 
months, and a daily average sick rate of but 
one per cent. 

The medical department of the Board's 
training service is in charge of Dr. William 
A. Brooks, a famous old-time Harvard row- 
ing coach, now a noted Boston surgeon. 
Each of the ten training ships of that Board 
is equipped with a modern hospital, in charge 
of a doctor and a staff of trained male 
nurses. All applicants are subjected to two 
strict medical examinations, one at their 
home town and one at the training ship. 
before admission to the service. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



PORT PERFORMANCES. 



The importance of a cargo carrier's time 
record in port was never greater than at 
present. Having in mind this fact, the Uni- 
ted States Shipping Board has announced 
that hereafter the port performances of the 
colliers in the New England coal carrying 
trade, the largest of all the coastwise trades 
of the United States, will be made the sub- 
ject of semi-weekly announcements. During 
a recent week the port performances of the 
best colliers in that trade, compared with 
the average of all colliers in it, were as 
follows : 

Loading ports — Baltimore, average of seven 
ships, 60 hours, 54 minutes in port. Best 
ship, "Tampico," 30 hours, 54 minutes in 
port. Norfolk and Newport News, average 
of 12 ships, 34 hours, 42 minutes in port. 
Best ship, "Bay View," 18 hours, 42 minutes 
in port. 

Discharging ports — Boston, average of 21 
ships, 116 hours, 30 minutes in port. Best 
ship, "Northern Queen," 49 hours, 54 min- 
utes in port. Other discharge ports, average 
of 17 ships, 100 hours, 18 minutes in port. 
Best ship, "Bay State," at Providence, R. I., 
42 hours, 6 minutes in port. 



A RECOGNITION OF LEADERSHIP. 



Ore carriers on the Lakes and lumber 
haulers on the Pacific Coast will please 
take notice ! 

The business of insuring American soldiers 
and sailors is scarcely a year old, and yet 
the Government has written more than $30,- 
000,000,000 of insurance, insuring approxi- 
mately three and a half million of soldiers 
and sailors. This gigantic business, employ- 
ing 10,000 individuals and doing a greater 
business than the largest insurance company 
of the world, has all been organized in less 
than twelve months. Of late the bureau has 
been doing more than a billion dollar a week 
business ; the total for the month of August 
will approximate $5,000,000,000 in new insur- 
ance. On one day 92,253 pieces of mail 
came to the bureau. It is a great work, an 
intricate work, a work that every American 
approves of. More than 90 per cent of the 
members of our military and naval forces 
are insured, and this insurance has strength- 
ened the morale of our fighting men and 
brought comfort and courage to their de- 
pendents at home. 



In order to greatly increase the production 
of salt-water fish and to make up for the loss 
in vessels and small producing units which 
American fisheries have suffered through the 
war and particularly by naval drafts, the 
Emergency Fleet Corporation, at the request 
of the United States Food Administration, 
will begin immediately the construction of a 
fleet of 75 deep-sea trawlers of the most 
modern type. These vessels, through ar- 
rangements with the fishing industry, will be 
put into operation early in 1919 on both the 
Atlantic and Pacific Coasts. Heavy increases 
in the annual production of haddock, small 
cod, flatfish, and other salt-water varieties 
will result, enabling carloads to enter all the 
interior markets of the country every week 
in the year. Stable prices will be maintained 
at low levels. Moreover, it is expected that 
the addition of the large catches of this 
fleet to the total fish supply of the Nation 
will effect a general lowering of prices on 
practically all varieties of both salt-water 
and fresh-water fish. Thus, both fish and 
fishermen will, to a greater measure than 
heretofore, help to win the war ! 



Frank P. Walsh Pays a Gracious But Well 

Deserved Tribute to Andrew Furuseth 

and Victor A. Olander. 



The following striking passages are selected 
from the closing argument of Mr. Frank P. 
Walsh, made at Chicago recently, in behalf of 
the Stock Yard workers: 

May it please your Honor: I never hear a 
speech made by an educated and clever man 
that I do not instinctively at the end try to 
gather the theme. We may forget the words, 
we may forget the line of argument, but if the 
man is one accustomed to dealing in facts and 
educated in logic the theme may always be 
found. I have sat here now for the actual day — 
during the period of the actual day for which 
we contend — eight hours, and I want to give 
your Honor the crystallization in my mind of 
what we call the "motif" or the theme of what 
has taken place here. 

The organized packers of America, afraid or 
ashamed to come in person, with other voices 
and through other lips, have made an appeal 
to your Honor to keep industries safe for autoc- 
racy while the hosts of democracy are battling 
for freedom of mankind upon a thousand battle- 
fields. And as I heard the discourse last night 
upon the subject of social discontent. — some- 
what modified this morning, but standing as a 
whole, of the dangers that would surround the 
body politic, aye, and even the lives of our 
people, if your Honor administered even-handed 
justice, I thought of a line of a speech made 
by a dead friend. He was not what might be 
called a radical; he was not strictly speaking 
a student of sociology, but in the combination 
of theology, philosophy and humanism, in my 
mind he had no peer during his life. He was 
the president — an early president — of the De- 
troit College, a great institution of learning 
founded by the Jesuit Fathers in Detroit, Michi- 
gan. He was the trustee of a fund of millions 
left by John E. Creighton, for the benefit of the 
Creighton University in Omaha. He was its 
first president and builder, and I heard him 
making this speech, not to a working class 
audience, not to a meeting of labor orzaniza- 
tions, but at the laying of the cornerstone of 
Rockhurst College in Kansas City, where my 
four boys now attend school. He was speak- 
ing largely to the men through whose wealth 
the foundation was laid for what we expect 
and hope to be one of the great universities of 
this world, and he said: "Let private property — 
aye, let organized society beware of the day 
when the worker awakes to the realization that 
from the material standpoint he is as well off 
in prison as he is outside. Let them beware 
when the exploited worker finally understands 
that he will be warmer, better clothed, better 
nourished and less harassed in prison than he 
is outside." 

And as the thought comes over me now, pro- 
ceeding to discuss the testimony of another 
man, I think of a sentiment very much like 
it from a far off source, so far as social 
environment and education is concerned. Many 
here, your Honor, probably know Andrew 
Furuseth. I don't believe I exaggerate when 1 
say that he has a deeper place in the hearts 
and affections of laboring men probably than 
any other labor man in the United States. He 
has as high a reputation for honesty as John 
Fitzpatrick and Ed Nockels, but he has a 
certain romantic atmosphere about him, due to 
the fight that he made for the Seamen's law, 
that 1 believe brings him closer to the hearts 
of the working people than even those men. 
For twenty years he gave battle to the shipping 
interests of the world at Washington to bring 
about better conditions for the men of his craft. 
During all those years he accepted nothing for 
compensation except the scale paid to an able 
seaman, under the scale made by his own 
union. When he left the halls of Congress, 
where he was respected by statesmen and ad- 
ministrators and all with whom he came in 
contact, it was to go to a lodging house along 
the Potomac River, so that his craft would not 
have to pay an excessive hotel bill while he 
was doing his work. During a strike in San 
Francisco a Federal judge issued an injunction 
against Andrew Furuseth, a part of the effect of 
which was to attempt to prevent him from 
making a speech to his fellows in a public 
place in the city of San Francisco. It appeared 
that he was going to disregard the injunction, 
and a reporter for a newspaper, who was in- 
terviewing him, asked him if he understood that 
there was a restraining order posted, — it not 
having been served upon Mr. Furuseth, — that 
prevented him from doing this act. Furuseth 
is a man from North country somewhere, prob- 
ably from Norway, speaking in broken English, 
be said, "What if 1 do?" The reporter said, 
"If you do you will be sent to jail." "To jail? 
I never saw the inside of a jail, but 1 have 
heard about it. They say the quarters are very- 
close and cramped. Very good. Mine have 
always been that way. They say the food is 
rough, and you get but little. I don't care. 
That has been my fond all my life. They say 
you are locked in a cell, you are Ion. i 
That is nothing to me. 1 have always 
lonesome." 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 10, 1918. 
Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., Frank Johnson presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping good. The following were 
elected delegates to the Nineteenth Annual Con- 
vention of the California State Federation of 
Labor, to meet at San Diego, Cal., on Oct. 7: 
E. A. Erickson, J. Faltus, F. Johnson, Harry 
Ohlson. Paul Scharrenberg, John H. Tennison. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 17, 1918. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., E. A. Erickson presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping good. Shipwreck Benefit was 
awarded to a member of the crew of the Schooner 
"James H. Bruce." 

JOHN H. TENNISON, 

Secretary pro tern. 

Maritime Hall Bldg., 59 Clay Street. Tel. 
Kearny 2228. 



St. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. 10, 1918. 
No meeting. Shipping slow; men scarce. 

J. ETCHELLS, Agent. 
Room 11, de Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 10, 1918. 
Shipping fair. 

WM. HARDY, Agent. 
58 Powell Street E. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. 
Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 10, 1918. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects fair. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 10, 1918. 
Shipping good. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 10, 1918. 
Shipping fair; members scarce. 

ED. ROSENBERG, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 10, 1918. 
Shipping good. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
88^ Third Street. Tel. Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 10, 1918. 
Shipping good; members scarce. 

HARRY OHLSON, Agent. 
128^4 Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 2, 1918. 
No meeting. Shipping dull. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 13, 1918. 

The regular' weekly meeting was called to 
order at 3:00 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. 
Secretary reported shipping good. The meeting 
elected George Brown delegate to the coming 
convention of the California State Federation of 
Labor to be held in San Diego, Oct. 7, 1918. 
EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market Street. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 5, 1918. 
No meeting. Shipping good; men scarce. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203. Phone Main 
2233. P. O. Box 214. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 4, 1918. 
No •meeting. No men ashore. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Atjent. 
Sepulveda Bldg., 128^ Sixth Street. Phone, 
Home 115; Sunset 66 W. 



DIED. 

Anders Gustaf Jansson, No. 1683, a native of 
Sweden, age 46. Died on board S. S. "Juneau," 
at Valparaiso, Chile. 

Andrew lacobscn, No. 1796, a native of Den- 
mark, age '39. Died at Seattle, Wash., Sept. 10, 
1918. 

Carl Curt Wetzel, No. 1038, a native of Ger- 
many, age 41. Died at Ukiah, Cal., Sept. 8, 1918. 



The G. M. Standifer Construction Company, 
Vancouver, Wash., ha-- completed construction 

of its new shipyard and work has been started 
,n tin first keel. The plant is equipped with five 
sets of ways. The company holds contracts for 
ten 9500-ton vessels. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



OUR WASHINGTON LETTER. 

(By Laurence Todd.) 



For the first time in American history 
the organized business men of the entire 
country have lined up against the organ- 
ized farmers and livestock raisers of the 
country, as well as against the forces of 
organized lahor, upon a great national is- 
sue. That issue is the taking over by the 
Federal Government of the big stockyards 
and the refrigerator and stock cars and 
the wholesale meat houses, in order to 
break the Chicago meat packers' monopoly. 

Organized labor first made its fight to 
get decent working conditions for the 
workers in the packing plants. Then the 
Federal Trade Commission, backed by the 
labor movement and by all of the organ- 
izations of farmers and livestock growers. 
investigated the packing monopoly, and 
showed that the Big Five — Armour, Swift, 
Morris, Wilson and Cudahy — controlled 
over 70 per cent, of the meat in the United 
States, beside controlling butter, eggs, 
cheese, fish, cereals, and various other 
foods. The Commissi« in showed that the 
combine had got a strangle-hold on the' 
food business, not merely in the United 
States but for most of the Allied coun- 
tries, and that its outrageous profits were 
due chiefly to the fact of its monopoly of 
the markets where livestock and meats 
must be sold. It proposed that Congress 
should smash the monopoly by taking 
away the private control of the markets. 

Kvery farmer organization in America 
is enthusiastically backing this demand. 
Half a dozen Senators — Borah, Norris, 
Ken von. Kendrick, Owen, (".ore — have al- 
ready spoken in support of the Federal 
Trade Commission's plan. But now comes 
the Chamber of Commerce of the United 
Statts, acting through its executive board, 
sending a letter to President Wilson de- 
nouncing the Commission and telling the 
President that the packers were given no 
chance to tell their side of the story. In 
this letter the Chamber declares that un- 
less the President shall appoint, to the two 
existing vacancies in the Commission, men 
who are of the right training and temper- 
ament and character, nothing can restore 
confidence in that body. 

Senators Smoot and Sherman, ami a 
number of reactionaries in the House, have 
joined in the chorus with the Chamber of 
Commerce of the United States. The 
lines are drawn sharply. On the one side 
are the people who have been robbed by 
the packers — the stockmen, the dairymen 
and farmers, the stockyards employes and 
the rank and file of retail consumers of 
meat or of substitutes for meat. They 
want to get rid of one of the most ruth- 
less exploiters in the whole world of^ com- 
merce. On the other side are lined up the 
commercial and manufacturing powers, 
with their press and their lawyers and 
friends in influential positions. Congress 
appears just now to be in the hands of 
the packers' friends. But the farmer-labor 
side is only now beginning to start the 

battle. 

* *• * 

News from Bridgeporl is that the elec- 
tion of delegates to the industrial conven- 
tion for the city has been held, and that 
the plan of industrial government set forth 
by the award of the National "War Labor 
Board is to he carried through, regardless 
of the refusal of a small body of the men 



to stay at work pending the establishment 
of this new organization. At Schenectady, 
J'ittsfield, Lynn, Waynesboro and at Beth 
leliem the same process is going forward 
or is now completed. Industrial govern- 
ment, based on equal and universal suf- 
frage of all the workers in the plants, is 
rising upon the ruins of the old-style open- 
shop terrorism. 

With tht enactment of the Man Power 
Act, there is more need than ever before 
for the putting of the war industries under 
representative democratic industrial con- 
trol. Steps arc now being taken to bring 
millions of additional women into the in- 
dustries, to release the men for military 
duty. These women have no training in 
trade unionism. Tiny would be helpless 
to defend their industrial rights against the 
individual employer who chose to impose 
upon them, if they did not come into a 
self-governing organization of the entire 
plant force, and if they did not learn at 
the outset, from Government spokesmen, 
that it was their duty to maintain the in- 
dustrial decencies — equal pay for similar 
work, eight-hour day. the health and com- 
fort minimum wage, and safeguards to 
health in the shop. 

Hundreds of thousands of these women 
will be voting in the industrial elections in 
the munitions plants before they are gath- 
ered into the American Federation of La- 
bor. 

* * * 

Basil M. Manly has joined the staff of 
the National War Labor Board, and is as- 
sisting in the work of Joint Chairman 
Walsh. Manly was chief of investigations 
under the Commission on Industrial Re- 
lations, of which Walsh was chairman, and 
prepared a large part of the famous report 
made by that body. He later joined the 
staff of the Federal Trades Commission 
as a special examiner in its investigation 
of the meat packers, and is understood to 
have had a great deal to do with the prep- 
aration of its report. He now returns to 
the field of industrial relations, in which 
there is no man in the country more capa- 
ble as an investigator. 

* * * 

Director General of Railroads McAdoo 
has announced a wage increase for nearly 
half of the 2,000,000 men in the Railroad 
Service, upon recommendation of the Board 
of Railway Wages and Working Condi- 
tions. Clerks, station employes, common 
laborers in the shops, roundhouses, sta- 
tions, storehouses and warehouses, station- 
ary firemen, boiler washers, power trans- 
fer and turntable operators arc covered 
by Supplement 7 to General Order 27. 
Supplement 8 covers maintenance of way 
employes, including workers on tracks. 
bridges, and buildings. The increase in 
pay averages about $25 a month, but the 
minimum wage is less than that set in any 
award of the National War Labor Board 
for other industries. The 8-hour day is 
established, but overtime Up to 10 hours 
is paid pro rata, with time and a half for 
overtime beyond 10 hours. 

The minimum rates paid for work in 
the Railroad Service arc less than those 
paid in munition plants because railroad 
jobs are permanent, ami because men are 
willing to take less money in order to 
avoid moving their families or going away 
from home. Gradually, the railroad work- 
ers anticipate, they will be able to get the 
same rate of pay as nun in the manufac- 



turing plants. They scarcely expect it 
while the war lasts. 

* * * 

\\ hile Representative Keating of Colo- 
rado is lighting for his political life, in 
his home district, against a combination of 
reactionaries, his bill establishing a mini- 
mum wage board for women and minors 
in the District of Columbia is to be taken 
up and probably passed by the Senate. 
The Senate has substituted the bill as it 
passed the House for the original bill of- 
fered in the Senate by Senator Trammel! 
of Florida. The legislative committee of 
the A. F. of L. is supporting the measure. 
which is chiefly promoted by the Con- 
sumers' League and the Women's Trade 
Union League. 

* * * 

Not only has the British Trade Union 
Congress, to which Samuel Gompers and 
President I'.owen of the Bricklayers' Inter- 
national Union were fraternal delegates, 
defeated by a large majority the resolution 
of J. llavelock Wilson calling for a five 
years' boycott against Germany after the 
war, but it has voted five to one again s1 
any change in the British policy of free 
trade with all the world. According to 
reports reaching Washington from the ses- 
sions at Derby, the British labor move- 
ment is unanimous in denouncing the bar- 
barities practiced by the Germans in their 
submarine campaigns, but it refuses to be- 
lieve that a boycott after the overthrow of 
the imperial system in Germany can do 
anything but harm to democracy in 
F.urope. 

By. a big majority, again, the Congress 
repudiated llavelock Wilson's project for 
a Trade Union Party. It was considered 
that the British Labor Party was an ade- 
quate and suitable political expression of 
the ideals of British labor. Arthur Hen- 
derson, its dominant figure, was the real 
leader of the Trade Union Congress*. He 
engaged in a good-naturtd exchange of 
views with Mr. Gompers on the occasion 
of the presenting of gifts to the American 
delegates. Mr. Gompers stated that in 
America the industrial ends of labor are 
kept separate from political ends. Mr. 
Henderson remarked that the industrial 
and political objectives of British labor 
went side by side, and that British labor 
was interested in international as will as 
national questions growing out of the war. 

Wither side changed its attitude. 



YOU ARE DOING IT. 



Every time you read, you purchasers of 
Liberty Bonds and War Savings Stamps, of 
what the United States is doing in France 
in building wharves and railroads, or delug- 
ing the Germans with gas or shelling them 
out of position with big guns or shrapnel, 
or of bombing their arsenals or cities, or 
of the great work of our Army and our 
Navy, or of the building of ships here, or 
of any or all of the great or small achieve- 
ments of America, here or abroad or on the 
seas, you buyers of Liberty Bonds and War 
Savings Stamps truthfully can say, "T had a 
hand in this": "I contributed to this"; "I 
am helping do this"; "It is a part of my 
work." 



About the least effective way of advocating 
any particular theory of reform is to cast 
discredit upon other theories. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



THE OFFICIAL FACTS. 



Wc have to-day, under contract or con- 
struction in the United States 819 ship- 
building ways. That, says Mr. Hurley, is 
twice as many ways as there are in all 
the other shipyards of the world combined. 

We turned out in the month of May 
more steel ship tonnage than we produced 
in the whole year 1915. In the month of 
July we more than doubled the May out- 
put. In the first five months of 1918 we 
produced 336,900 tons more than in the two 
years 1915 and 1916. In the next two 
months of 1918 we more than equalled the 
output of the first five months. From 
August 1917 to August 1918 we placed 
in service a million and a half dead weight 
tons, of which more than half was built 
during the last three months of that period. 

Of our 819 ways, 751 arc for the build- 
ing of cargo ships. At our present rate of 
production, by 1919 we should be con- 
tinuously building on each way an average 
of 6000 tons of steel, wood and concrete 
ships. If we can average three ships per 
way in a year, we should turn out 13,500,- 
000 tons in 1919. That is more than has 
been turned out by Great Britain herself 
in any five years of her history. 

Our boats are not being built by private 
capital for private ownership. They are 
built by the United States Government. 
They will be controlled by the United 
States Shipping Board. They are being 
built by the people and they will be owned 
by the people. 

We have to-day, 350,000 workers en- 
gaged in building merchant vessels in the 
shipyards and 200,000 in the iron works, 
steel mills, shops and factories making 
ship-building materials. A little more than 
a year ago this industry did not exist. 
Now it employs four times as many work- 
ers as the automobile industry employed at 
the time of the last census. 

It has been created with practically no 
labor troubles. "In every dispute," says 
Chairman Hurley, "we have asked the men 
to be patient and to go on with the su- 
preme task of building ships, trusting to 
Uncle Sam to set the matter right and 
they have responded." The men have 
voted to eliminate holidays and Saturday 
afternoons off. They have "speeded up 
riveting to such an extent that it has been 
necessary to safeguard the energy which 
they have been willing to pour out for 
the country." 

The collier "Tuckahoe," of 5500 tons, 
was built in 27 days. The "West Lianga" 
was built in 78 days. Ten ships have been 
built in an average of 100 days each. The 
"Tuckahoe" has been carrying four cargoes 
of coal a month from Norfolk and Balti- 
more to Boston, instead of two cargoes a 
month which was the average previously. 

In short to meet the submarine menace, 
we have established the greatest shipbuild- 
ing industry in the world, in a year, out 
of nothing. We are building ships faster 
than they have ever been built before. 
And those ships are proving themselves 
the most speedy and efficient of their class. 



Tt is easy enough to arouse enthusiasm 
with a new idea, but not so easy to compel 
thought by the expression of an old truth. 



OUR ARMY'S HEALTH. 



During the Mexican war, the annual 
death rate from disease among our troops 
was 100 men out of every thousand. Dur- 
ing our Civil War, the rate was as high as 
60 out of every thousand. During our 
Spanish-American war, it was 25 out of 
every thousand. Now the Surgeon Gen- 
eral's office reports that among our troops 
at home and abroad, the annual death rate 
from disease fluctuates from less than 2 
per thousand to slightly more than 3 per 
thousand. 

This is an incredible record. The best 
of all previous performances was in the 
Russian-Japanese war, when the annual 
death rate from disease among the Japa- 
nese troops was 20 per thousand. Our 
present rate is about one-tenth of that. 
The annual death rate from disease among 
American men of military age in civil life 
is 6.7 per thousand. Our army rate is 
about one-third of that. 

And the miracle has been achieved not 
by any one medical discovery or precau- 
tion, but by a campaign of administrative 
vigilance that has used every means to 
protect and promote and assure the health 
of millions of men. 

At the outbreak of the war the most 
skillful physicians in America were drawn 
into service. The camps and cantonments 
were located by sanitary experts. The plans 
for the buildings were reviewed by civil 
medical boards after these plans had been 
passed by the army authorities. Neither 
local influence nor political pull was given 
any consideration in placing the camps or 
in building them. 

A system of thorough inoculation against 
typhoid, malaria, and the so-cajled ."water 
diseases," completely eliminated those in- 
fections that caused 85 per cent, of all the 
deaths from disease during our Spanish- 
American war. A similar campaign of pre- 
vention and of education was similarly 
successful against venereal diseases. When 
the recruits were first gathered together in 
the camps, the annual hospital admission 
rate for venereal diseases was as high as 
400 out of every thousand men. Now, 
among our Expeditionary Forces in France, 
that rate is as low as 44 per thousand men. 
Among the recruits last winter, measles 
became epidemic, followed by pneumonia 
and empyema. Effective preventive meas- 
ures have now been established against 
the spread of measles, and the medical 
department has ascertained the cause of 
empyema and found a successful method 
of treatment. At Fort Riley, Kansas, there 
were 85 cases of empyema under treatment 
from October 20 to January 29, and of 
these 52 died. From January 29 to April 
30, there were 69 cases treated by the 
newly discovered method and only six died. 
That is to say, the most serious epidemic 
disease which the army had to combat 
last winter has now been overcome, and 
the danger of another such epidemic has 
been averted. 



The man in the dark follows the cry of 
"Progress" without really knowing whether 
it comes from ahead or from behind. 



The man who is enjoined from doing a 
thing that is lawful may be depended upon to 
do that thing, if only as a means of vindi- 
cating the law. 



TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS. 



The force of a truth may be belter evi- 
denced by the opposition than by the ap- 
proval with which it is at first greeted. 



Some of our national transportation 
problems and difficulties can be better un- 
derstood when it is remembered that in 
the northeastern section of the United 
States, including New York, Pennsylvania, 
adjoining States, and New England, the 
population is 693 persons to every mile of 
railroad ; in the South the figures are 407 
persons per mile; and in the West, 252. 

There are 15 square miles of land to 
every mile of railroad in the West, while 
in the East there is 1 mile of railroad to 
every 5 square miles of land. There are 
innumerable factories in this eastern the- 
ater, and the bringing in of coal and raw 
material and the carrying out of manu- 
factured products make up a tremendous 
freight tonnage. 

The Railroad Administration is solving 
gradually many problems. By the elim- 
ination of many unnecessary passenger 
trains several thousand engines are di- 
verted from passenger to freight traffic, 
which relieves the situation materially. 
Also by loading the freight cars to full 
capacity a great saving is being accom- 
plished. Routing freight by the most di- 
rect route, and other methods adopted by 
the Administration, are doing much to 
ease the strain on our transportation fa- 
cilities. 

— -*■ 

Labor's Economic Platform 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor dis- 
putes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight 
hours per day on all Federal, State or municipal 
work, and not less than the prevailing per diem 
wage rate of the class of employment in the 
vicinity where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man-suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or 
compartments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain. 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



These boys will be called into the mili- 
tary service in camp when the year class 

to which they belong is called up. 

At the discretion of the War Depart- 
ment scientific and technical students may 
be given an opportunity to complete scien- 
tific courses of direct military value. Oth- 
ers will be assigned to depol brigades of 
cantonments. Both the college and the 
vocational detachments will he watched for 
possible officer material. 



Workers to be Tested for Physical Fitness. 

Because of a scarcity of physicians the 

War Labor Policies Board recommends 

that a physical examination of workers, 
recruited by the United States Employ- 
nient Service, he first tested in a few in- 
dustrial centers "with a view to extending 
as the experiments made and the develop- 
ment of the employment service warrant." 

The recommendation for physical exami- 
nation of these workers is the result of a 
conference in New York, July 15 last, 
under the auspices of the subcommittee 
on welfare work, committee on labor. 
Council of National Defense, when it was 
resolved : 

"The physical examination of workers 
is primarily a measure of health conser- 
vation and also essential to maximum pro- 
duction — a war necessity. 

"That the purpose of a medical examina- 
tion is not to eliminate the worker from 
industrial service, but to adapt him to 
the work he is physically fitted fur." 

In recommending that the examination 
of workers be one of the functions of the 
United States Employment Service, the 
conference favored the establishment of a 
central examination board composed oi 
representatives of the workers, employers 
and the Government, and that this board 
issue examination cards indicating the 
health of the workers and classify them 
according to physical fitness. 

This system, it is stated, is not intended 
to "prevent employers from maintaining 
their own system of physical examinations 
and follow-up methods for the purpose of 
conserving the health of their workers." 



Necessary Workers Can Gain Exemption. 
Provost Marshal General Crowdef calls 
attention to that section of the new draft 
law which liberalizes deferred classifica- 
tion and permits district boards to include 
in such classification those men whose 
work is necessary to the Government in 
its present emergency. 
The Provost Marshal General says: 
"Hankers and persons engaged in other 
occupations and employments not hereto- 
fore regarded by district boards as war- 
anting deferred classification on the 
ground of necessary industries, may now 
claim deferred classification on the ground 
that their work is necessary to the Nation 
in the present emergency. 

\n amendment in the new man-power 
legislation recently passed, changed the 
provision: 'Persons engaged in industries. 
including agriculture,' so as to make it 
read: 'Persons engaged in industries, oc- 
cupations or employments, including agri- 
culture, found to be necessary to the 
maintenance of the military establishment 
or the effective operation of the military 



forces or the maintenance of national in- 
terest during the emergency.' 

"The effect of this is to enable neces- 
sary persons in occupations or employ- 
ments to make claims that they are en- 
gaged in occupations or employments that 

the district board may find necessary to 
the maintenance of the military establish- 
ment or to the maintenance of the national 
interest during the war. 

"Thus, in other words, has been re- 
moved the danger of a too narrow con- 
struction of the word 'industries' which 
many district boards in the past have con- 
strued as excluding bankers, those engaged 
in commerce, and those engaged in various 
other occupations. Under the amendment, 
lor example, district boards may find that 
certain men holding important positions in 
the Red Cross and kindred activities, or 
men enegaged in public health work, are 
engaged in occupations necessary to the 
maintenance of the military establishment 
or to the maintenance of the national in- 
terest, and, for that reason, are entitled 
to deferred classification. 

"In making claims of the kind, the per- 
sons concerned may make use of those 
parts of the questionnaire relating to 
claims for deferred classification on the 
ground of being engaged in industries, in- 
cluding agriculture." 



Miners Give Their Lives. 

Miners arc risking their lives to win this 
war, as well as the soldier boys at the 
front, says the Federal Bureau of Mines, 
in a report on the loyalty of America's 
coal diggers. 

"In the year 1917, the last for which 
statistics are available, 2,696 miners gave 
tip their lives while digging coal to win 
the war. Unfortunately the Government 
dues not tabulate the casualties of the 
mines as it does of the soldiers. If the 
number of injuries could be shown, they 
would indicate that mining, perhaps, is as 
hazardous as war. Yet the miner goes 
about his work with the same enthusiasm 
and the same fearlessness as the boys 'over 
there,' and is surely doing his part toward 
winning the war," says the bureau. 

"The lone miner in his working place, 
tearing the coal from its resting place, 
knows more coal means more guns, more 
ships, more munitions, and that these mean 
victory and the saving of the lives of their 
brothers who are fighting across the seas." 



Dollar Power Shrinks. 

Figures published by the Department of 
Labor show that the purchasing power of 
$1 in July, 1918, as compared with July, 
1913, five years previous, has shrunk to 54 
cents in Washington and P.altimore, 57 
cents in Philadelphia, 59 cents in New- 
York and Chicago, and 63 cents in San 
Francisco. 

Stating this in another way, the in- 
crease in the cost of food during the five- 
year period was 85 per cent, in Washing- 
ton. 84 per cent, in Baltimore, 77 per cent. 
in Philadelphia, 68 per cent, in New York, 
69 per cent, in Chicago and 58 per cent, 
in San Francisco. 

In the one-year period from July, 1917, 
to July. I°d8, food advanced 22 per cent, 
in San Francisco, 21 per cent, in Wash- 
ington and Philadelphia, 20 per cent, in 
Baltimore, 1~ per cent, in New York and 
1 1 per cent, in Chicago. 



A RECOGNITION OF LEADERSHIP. 

(Continued from Page 7.) 



I thought of these words when I heard those 
gentlemen talking about the discontent that 
would come with the administration of justice 
in this arbitration proceeding. I thought of it 
when I heard that great bodies of other men 
would sink down on their knees, as I believe 
they will, and thank the living God that some- 
thing happened, even if it was a war that 
destroyed other lives, that brought some meed 
ot justice and some happiness into the lives of 
countless millions of people. Mavbe I am 
wrong. 

I thought of those words of Furuseth and 
father Dowllng again when I heard here this 
morning that it you elevated a man, if you 
gave him enough to cat, if you put him on a 
pedestal of manhood, that every child who 
came into the world is entitled to occupy 
by making him economically independent, that 
he would become a recreant emplove: that he 
would not furnish for the $5 wage which he 
received, if that was the amount fixed the 
same meed of faithful service that he had faith- 
fully given under the circumstances admitted 
by Mr. Churchill, when he was not getting 
enough to cat. I do not understand the causes 
ot discontent if such things make for discon- 
tent. 

And thinking of Furuseth naturallv brings 
to my mind here another man, and I was 
thinking as I heard the argument of some of 
the lawyers here "What would Victor Olander 
think to-day if, in Washington, attending to 
the duties of this Government at great sacrifice, 
lie heard that a lawyer was attempting to twist 
his splendid effort in behalf of leading your 
Honor's mind along the path of justice and the 
granting of the eight-hour day, to the con- 
fusion and the destruction of his own cause and 
his own people?" 

He is a sailor like Furuseth. There is some- 
thing in the occupation of a sailor that means 
a contemplative view of life and things, and 
conservative thought along all of the great de- 
partments of human activity and life, just as 
there is something in the trade of a horse- 
shoer that makes a man fight against the ele- 
ments, against the strength of the animal king- 
dom, and against the advances of exploiting 
tyrants like John Fitzpatrick has been fighting 
since last July for the people behind the 
yards. 

The most awesome place in the world to me 
is on the shores of the Pacific Ocean on the 
California coast. I can stand on the Atlantic, 
close my eyes and vision myriads of great 
cities, the capitals of the world— a few days on 
an ocean greyhound and you arc there. But I 
cannot imagine anything beyond the Pacific 
Ocean. I have stood there time and time again. 
I have looked at that beautiful sight, the sun 
going down over the western horizon, and I 
can think of nothing but infinity, but the 
omnipotent God, but of the great things that 
stir a man's soul when he is in the face of 
something so expansive and so full of meaning 
that all the petty things of life leave him. And 
maybe it is because those men, poorly fed, 
hard worked, if you will, sit on the deck of a 
boat for hours alone, lost in contemplation, 
that perhaps the beauties of the heavens or 
the ^errifying phenomena, the hurricane, the 
play' of the storm, perhaps, it is because they 
have the time to think between ports that 
brings to the surface intellects of the character 
of Andrew Furuseth and Victor Olander. 

Victor Olander came here for a purpose, and 
I want to say that he discharged it with a fair- 
ness and with a fidelity and with an intellectual- 
ity that makes me prouder than ever to call 
him my friend, and to know that I have lived 
and worked in his time. He brought down anil 
voiced, 1 say in two hours, the combined testi- 
mony of the sages who have studied the ques- 
tion of the eight-hour day, of the industrial 
administrators such as these gentlemen who 
have applied the eight-hour day: of the splendid, 
grateful, happy voices of the millions of people 
who are given a place in the good things of 
the world — the laborer, by the application of 
the eight-hour day. And he epitomized the 
thought that I tried to give you yesterday 
when he was asked the question, ''Would you 
put in force the actual eight-hour day if it 
limited production and interfered with the war?" 
"Certainly not," he said. And that expression 
lias been tried to be twisted against him in an 
effort, illogical, it is true, but in an effort 
nevertheless, to have your Honor misunder- 
stood and misapply his testimony. 



Commissioners Francis Krull and Thomas F. 
Ilaydcn and Master in Chancery II. M. Wright 
of San Francisco have been appointed by Fed- 
eral Judge M. T. Dooling to arbitrate t lie wage 
difficulties between the Shipowners and Mer- 
chants' Tugboat Companv ami the Marine En- 
gineers' Heneficial Association, No. 35; Golden 
Gate Harbor. No. 40, of the American Masters, 
Mate- and Pilots' Association. Thomas Crowley 
and William F. Humphrey, representing the 
shipowners, and Peter Hansen and Ernest I'". 
Pogg the employes, have signed an agreement 
to abide by the decision of the arbitrators. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



PROGRESS ABROAD. 



The national trade-union federations of 
the three Scandinavian countries report a 
very noteworthy increase of their mem- 
bership during the year 1917. 

In Sweden the trade-union movement at 
the end of the year under review had a 
membership of 186,146, an increase of 45,- 
334 (39.2 per cent.) over the preceding 
year. The female membership had in- 
creased from 8,238 to 14,402. The total 
increase of membership is distributed 
among a number of federations, among 
which those of the metal workers, sawmill 
workers, factory workers, transport and 
mercantile workers, tailors, bookbinders, 
and workers in communal employment 
show the largest increases. Accurate data 
as to the wage movements organized dur- 
ing the year under review are not yet 
available, but the total amount of the 
strike benefits paid by the trade-unions 
during 1917 is the largest since the general 
strike in 1909. 

The National Central Federation of the 
Norwegian Trades-Union reports an in- 
crease of its membership -during the past 
year by 14,000, the total membership being 
93,000 in round numbers. Notwithstand- 
ing the fact that during 1917 the number 
of wage movements was very large — 559, 
involving 65,000 workers — strike was re- 
sorted to in only 44 movements, affecting 
about 3,000 workers. The Central Fed- 
eration's share in the strike benefits paid 
was 85,000 crowns ($22,780) as against 
660,000 crowns ($176,880) in 1916. A very 
important movement brought about the 
introduction of eight-hour shifts in the 
paper, cellulose, and wood-pulp industries. 
In these industries 14,000 workers are now 
working under an eight-hour shift system. 
The building trades federations were able 
to conclude collective agreements in most 
of the large cities of the country. These 
agreements affected about 6,000 workmen. 
The membership of the trade-unions af- 
filiated with tht Danish National Federa- 
tion increased in 1917 by 28,762 to a total 
of 179,284, of which 27,776 were female 
members. At the end of the year under 
review 53 federations with a total of 1,674 
trade-unions, 208 of which were newly 
founded, were affiliated with the Central 
Federation. The report of the National 
Federation mentions negotiations with Ger- 
man trade-union leaders which took place 
to safeguard the interests of Danish work- 
ers going to Germany in quest of employ- 
ment. It had become known that Danish 
workmen through false promises of Ger- 
man labor agents had been enticed to go 
to Germany. An agreement was reached 
that the activities of such labor agents in 
Denmark should cease and that the Danish 
trade-unions should act as employment 
agencies for those of their unemployed 
members who intended to seek work in 
Germany. The activities of the Danish 
trade unions in this respect never attained 
any importance and now have been dis- 
continued entirely. The annual report of 
the federation also calls attention to a 
number of unauthorized strikes brought 
about by syndicalistic agitation. The em- 
ployers obtained prosecution by the courts 
of the instigators of these strikes and seven 
labor organizations were fined in the total 
amount of 40,800 crowns ($10,934.40). Of 
this amount 32,000 crowns ($8,576) were 
paid by the shipyard workers' organiza- 



tion, which is not affiliated with the Na- 
tional Federation of Trade-Unions. 



GERMAN SEAMEN'S WAGES. 



Negotiations conducted in Hamburg be- 
tween the organized seamen of Germany 
and the Central Association of German 
Shipowners as to further increases of war 
bonuses and overtime wages have recently 
been terminated with favorable results for 
the seamen. 

The monthly war bonuses paid to sea- 
men in addition to their basic wages have 
been increased as follows : 

FROM— TO— 

Marks Marks 

Apprentices 15 ($3.57) 20 ($ 4.76) 

Ordinary seamen 25 ($5.95) 30 ($ 7.14) 
Able-bod. seamen 40 ($9.52) 50 ($11.90) 
Boatswains, car- 
penters, cooks.. 40 ($9.52) 50 ($11.90) 

Trimmers 20-40 ($4.76-$9.52) 30-50 ($7.14-$11. 90) 

Firemen 40 ($9.52) 50 ($11.90) 

Peltv officers and 

machinists 40 ($9.52) 50 ($11.90) 

Stewards 20-40 ($4.76-$9.52) 30-50 ( $7.14-$11.90) 

Married seamen of all grades arc to re- 
ceive an additional monthly bonus of 10 
marks ($2.38). Overtime wages, which 
hitherto varied between 50 and 60 pfennigs 
(11.9 and 14.3 cents) per hour, have been 
increased to 60 and 70 pfennigs (14.3 and 
16.7 cents). These increases became ef- 
fective on April 1, 1918, and are applica- 
ble to all parts of the North and Baltic 
Seas and all German navigation companies 
and seamen. Further negotiations with re- 
spect to questions of board, employment, 
and raising of the standards of qualifica- 
tion for crews are proposed to take place 
in the near future. The facts contained 
herein are translations from the Vorwarts, 
made for the U. S. Department of Labor 
Statistics. 



PROUD OF THEIR JOBS. 



The thousands of young men now enter- 
ing the Merchant Marine through the train- 
ing ships of the United States Shipping 
Board Recruiting Service are proud of their 
jobs, and properly so. 

To them is given the task of bearing the 
flag on unarmed vessels through war-in- 
fested waters. The warrior in armor in 
the old days was proof against the spears 
of his enemy. The warrior afloat to-day in 
a swift and armored ship is so nearly proof 
against the skulking pirate of the sea, the 
German U-boat, that he gives his danger 
little thought. 

The merchant sailor, on the other hand, 
goes unarmed in many instances, as along 
the American coast, where U-boats are now 
operating. This does not deter him from 
carrying out his appointed work in the 
war, and he does it with pride and without 
fear. 

That this is so is proven every day, 
when young men go from the training 
ships aboard the merchant vessels on which 
they are to serve as sailors, firemen, cooks, 
coal-passers, or whatever their grade may 
be. Fear is not in them. They are glad 
to go, and the presence of the U-boats in 
coastal waters spurs them on, if anything. 

This is the answer of the young men 
who enter the Merchant Marine to the 
slanders of enemies ashore, that they 
choose this service because it is non-com- 
batant. — The Merchant Mariner, published 
by tin- United States Shipping Board Re- 
cruiting Service. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Page 5.) 
LAKE DISTRICT— (Continued). 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

Branches: 

CLEVELAND. 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO. Ill 4 E. Austin Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, Mich 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, Wis 309 Tower Avenut 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenut 

TOLEDO, Ohio 821 Summit Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 35 West Eagle Street, 

Telephone Seneca 896. 

J. M. SECOND, Secretary. 

Branches: 

CHICAGO, 111 406 N. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND, Ohio 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio 85 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, Oh'j 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, Ohio 821 Summit Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 
Marine Hospitals: 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 



Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Puluth. Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 
Erie, Pa. 
Menominee, Mich. 



Relief Stations: 

Ogdensburg, N. T. 
Oswego, N. Y. 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan, Wis. 
Superior, Wla. 
Toledo, O. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 59 Clay Street 

Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C 1424 Government Street 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 1365 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 North 30th Street 

SEATTLE, Wash.. 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 65 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 6 

PORTLAND, Ore 88% 3rd Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU. H. T P. O. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 64 Pike St. Viaduct, P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal.. 613 Beacon Street, P. O. Box 674 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 

PORTLAND, Ore 98 Second Street N 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 64 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 42 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 1S8 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC. 

Headquarters. 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C). Canada P. O. Box 968 

KETCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
A.sTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 111 



12 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




General Manager Piez of the Uni- 
ted States Shipping Board has no- 
tified district managers that it should 
be their particular business to 
in paying men hack wages. "Our 
failure," he says, "to meet promptly 
and fully the conditions imposed by 
the Macy hoard is causing discontent 
and unrest among organized lahor, 
and every possible step should im- 
mediately be taken to pay retroactive 
wages still due." 

( Miners of the 1 n t e r n a t i O n al 
Brotherhood of Bookbinders report 
that the h-cal at Franklin, Pa., has 
raised wages to $25 a week for male 
workers. Substantial increases have 
also been secured for bindery girls. 
I os Angeles lias secured a rate of 
SJ4 for men and $12 for women: 
Winnipeg, $26 and $13, and New 
Orleans similar advances, The total 
membership of the international on 
Augusl 10 was 15,928. 

The management of the Blooming- 
ton (111.) Canning Company is ex- 
plaining how a strike started among R^kstwrn. C. 

these unorganized workers. "It was ; Bates, J. D. 

r , Brown, Albert 

all on accounl of a stranger, who BrInk> Harald 

accepted employment, started the SeMen^. A - 

trouble and then left the > fS Barry, B. 

the company officials. The company Balstad.' Alp 

acknowledges that low wages are , Bradburr^ Edw. 
paid, hut, of course, its employes Carlse'n, Oscar 
were happy and contented until that ^^ £ ar p d 

Carlson. Eric 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Office Prion* Elliott 1196 



Established 1890 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-Oate Method* In Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

COMPASSES ADJUSTED 

500-1 SECURITIES BLDG. Next to U. S. Steamship Inspectors' Office 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Seattle, Wmh., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mall forwarded 
during that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mail until arrived. 

Ahlstrom, Ellis Ltdsten. Chris. 

Anderson, P. W. Lee. C. L. 

Anderson, Wm. Lubhurs, H. J. 

Antonsen, Charlie H.Lundgren, Chas. 



Aso, Guss 
Anslltz, John 

. K. 
Aase, O. R. 
Andersen, Julius 
Anderson, Andrew 
Anderson, J. E. 
Andersen, A. C. 
Andersen, Martin 
Andersen. John 
Albregtsen, G. 
Austin. H. 
Anderson, Fredhof 
Anderson, T. -2064 
F. 



Larsen. Ed. 
Larson, Gust 
Lux, Chas. 
Malk, Peter 
Mathlson, Martin 
Mlcholsen, A. 
McGregor, D. 
Maher, Thomas 
McLeod, John 
Magnusen, Lars 
Marthinson, Krs. 
Mlkkelsen. K. -1G20 
Mlkkelsen, Holder 
Mickelsen, Harald 
McGillivray, F. B. 

D. 
McDonald, Wm. 
McPherson, James 
Moe, Albert 
Moore, Thomas 
Moore, J. M. 
Muier, James 
Nelsson, Emil 
Nelson. C. R. 
Nordfeldt. T. F. 
Nelson, W. 
Nelsen, Steve 
Nelson, Svend F. 
Ness, Louis 
Norrls, T. F. 



Chrlstoffersen, JohnNyhagen. Julius 



stranger came in their midst. 

The House of Representatives I,,. Vnnnl^m^Ge^FNe^yHans L 
passed the Keating Minimum \\ age j r.arruthers, M. Nolan. J. 

bill. The purposes of this lcgisla- gg}^ ! J.' ^1586 



tion are defined as follows: "A bill ggg"^^ 3 

to protect the lives and health ana ICrumlich. F. 
morals of women and minor work- gjJJjSN?'' 



crs in the District of Columbia and 
to establish a minimum wage hoard 



Desmond, C 
Dunwoortv, Geo. 
Enton. I. N. 

and define its powers and duties, and ^ 1 , ^ hl > r ^ nk 

to provide for the fixing of minimum 

wages for such workers and for 

other purposes." The hill now goes gptojn/Jgc^ 

to the Senate. 

Attorneys for Thomas J. Mooney 
have announced that an appeal for a ^^e'k/'A ' 

Fernquist, C. W. 



Endresin, I. 
Edman, O. -551 

Eriokson. Chas. 



Forslund, Victor 
Ferguson, B. 
Flnnsburg, Ira 



new trial will be carried to the Uni 
ted States Supreme Court. The ap- 
peal will he hased on that section of 
the Federal Constitution which es- 
tahlishes the rights of citizens. The 
California State Supreme Court has 
twice refused to order a new trial 
on the ground that in criminal cases 
that are referred to it the law docs 
not permit it to consider matter not 
contained in the record of the case. 
\- irregularities in the conviction of 
Mooney were discovered after the 
trial was ended, the Court declines 
to order a new trial because the 
charges of irregularity are not in the 
record. 

The "good old days." when em- 
ployers had nothing to arbitrate, are 
gone, hut George Steinle of Madison, 
Wis., is still living in the time when 
Coal Owner P.aer announced that he 
and his kind held their property as a 
trust from the One ahove. Mr. 
Steinle is president of the Steinle 
Turret Lathe Company, and at a 
wage hearing before Government 
conciliators, it was developed that 
wage increases were offered employes 
if they would sign agreements not to 
join a trade union, in defense of 
this attitude Mr. Steinle testified: 
"I make the statement that hefore 
I will let the union tell me how to 
run my plant I will either tear or 
hum it down. That is my inherent 
right, just as it was my inherent 
right to start the plant. 1 lose my 
temper and I am proud of it. 1 never 
did anything in my life that 1 re- 
gret." 



Forshing, J. M. 
Gronlund, Osrar 
Onhrlelspn. Peder 
Glrndlsson, Ed. 
Gronseth, .Tohan 
Oronroos, E. 
Grant. J. J. 
Oundersen, And. 
Gustafson, Oscar 
GundPrson, C. A. 
Hanson, Ole 
Hansen, Henrlch 
Hansen, Olaf 
Henrlcksen, Ch. 
Heokola, S 



Nordstrom, John 
Overland, Oscar 
Olsen, Harald 
Olsen, Ole J. -542 
Olsen, Hjalmar 
Olsen, J. G. F. 
Ogga, Edward 
Odall, E. TV. 
Olsen, O. P. -1141 
Olsen, Alf. 
Olsen, Geo. M. 
Olsen, B. 
Olsen, Elmer 
Olliver, James 
Pakki, Emil 
Pap, Johannes 
Powell, H. A. 
Paase, And 
Pallesen, K. 
Petersen, John 
Pendville, N. 
Petersen, B. 
Petterson, Oscar 
Rasmussel, Ole 
Rosen, E. H. 
Rallo, Max. 
Rumquist, Gust 
Ryberg, T. 
Rydquist, C. H. 
Rasmussen, Paul 
Rasmussen, R. P. 
Rlsbech. H. 
Reid. TV. R. 
Ring, TV. 
Rise, D. L. 
Rod, S. 
Ryan, Thos. 
Rylander, R. 



Henrieksnn,' Victor Sandberg, Otto 



Homes, C. 
ITrnrlksen, Geo. 
Uforth, Knud 
TTollman, TV. C. 
Hnbnstrom, Fritz 
Holmes, C. 
Rolten, Crist 
Hunter. G. H. 
Hansen, Lauritz 

Fmll 
Hiniard, C. R. 
Ralvorsen, Hans J, 
Hansen, S. -2072 
Hetman. J. 
Herlitz. I. 
Ingelbretson, O. E 
Tversen, Ole 
.Tfnnings, Harry 
Johnson, Angl 
Johnson. Herman 
.Tnal, M. B. 
Johnson, C. A. 
Jospfson, Ben 
Julisson, C. A. 
.Tr-nsen. G. 
Ja rzenbeok, J. 
Jensen. Henry 
Johnson, Olaf 
.Torgpnson, TVm. 



Sedon, Geo. 
Snell, Adolf 
Soderberg, Albin 
Swanson. J. -1331 
Sund. Alex. 
Sevfreld, M. 
Stotzerman, Emil 
Swanson, TVm. 
Sagura, John 
Sandanger, Ole 
Sarin 

Sauer, Ernie 
Samuelsen. Harold 
Selander, TV. 
Rkldsmo, TV. A. 
Strangard, C. 
Rorensen, G. T. 
Sorensen, J. N. 
Saenila, Arvid 
Svenson, Edwin 
Thorsen. Herman 
2044Farve, J. O. 
Tempde, A. H. 
Torgesen. Laurlts 
Thoresen, I. N. 
Trygg, Gust 
Tornquist. H. 
TVurst, TValtT 
WaTker, J. H. 



.Torgenson. Fredrick TVirtanen, Geo. 
Krueger, Johan TVinther, T. 

Kallanen, M. J. TVinstrom, Oscar 

Knrlson, G. A. -1190TVtrta, G 



Kattel. Joseph 
Karlson. Tngvald 
KliifT. TV. 
Kramer, Otto 
Kullch, John 
Larsen, Martin 
T.arsen, Fred 
T.arsen. A. B. 
T.nwson, Arthur 
T.arsen. Nils 
T.arsen, Pete 



TVahlstrom, Eric 
TVebach, S. 
Walsh. E. 
TVestgaard, John 
West. Joseph 
Ween, O. 
Welln, I. 
Wilson, S. G. 
Wilson. A. B. 
Package. 
Johnson, Oscar 



EUREKA, CAL. 
Mercantile Lunch 

Is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy & Haakon's 

Proprietors 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

612 Fourth Street - Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda. 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers in Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER & HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIG STORES 

Store No. 1 — Cor. Main snd First 

Store No. 2— Westlake and Pins 

SEATTLE 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Creamatory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. 8. SMITH 
Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats. Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor In New York Nautical College. 
Room 4140 ARCADE BUILDING 
Third Floor, First Avenue Side 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

A SQUARE MEAL 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



Sailors' Outfitter 
BENJAMIN'S 

The Old Reliable 

CLOTHING, SHOES. HATS. RUBBER 

AND OIL CLOTHING 
207 Second Street Eureka, Cal. 
E. BENJAMIN, Prop. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 
Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 
• and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

$16-817 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE. WASH. 



Cigars and Tobaccos 

Periodicals 
F. W. MOGENSEN 

217 E STREET EUREKA, CAL. 



DRUGS, KODAKS, 

STATIONERY 
The REXALL Store 

ATKINSON & WOODS 
F STREET, Cor. 2d, EUREKA, CAL. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention The Sea- 
men's Journal. 



Aberdeen, Wash , Letter List 

Anderson. Peter KanKaanpaa. J. E. 

Albers, Geo. Lampe, Fred 

Browen, Alexander Lehtonen, A. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING. HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS. SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES. OVERALLS. SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN, Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders Taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

320-322 So. F St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention The Sea- 
men's Journal. 



Braun, Alex. 
Bjerk, G. T. 
Bruhn, Chas. 
Brun, Mattia 
Brant. Max 
Barrot, G. 
Brandt, H. 
Benfjtson, S. 
Davis, John 
Eliassen, H. C. 
Flohten, James 
Frohne, Robert 
Hedrick. Jack 
High, Edward 
Helander, J. F 
Heyn, Th. 
Jansson, John 
Jansson, J. A. 



Markman. H. 
Malkoff, Peter 
Meiners, Herman 
Masnusson. Charles 
Newman, I. 
Olsen, A. 
Olson, W. 
Olsen, Alf 
Olsen, Ferdenan 
Petersen, Harry 
Pederscn, Alf. 
Rahlf. J. 
Risenius, Sven 
Rosenblad, Otto 
Swanson, G. 
Svenson. Gustaf 
Torin, Gustaf A. 
Thompson, Alex. 



Johansson, John F. Valfors, Arvid 
Johnsen, Hans Wendt, W. 

Johnson, Hilmar Williams, T. C. 
K alias, AugSTS Zimera, Geo. 

Khamp, S. 



Phone 203 

"Ole and Charley" 

"The Royal" 
"The Sailors' Rest" 

Cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
219 EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



HARRY W. LEVY 

CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS 
Union Made Goods, Hats, Shoes, 

Trunks and Suitcases 

Fishermen's and Sailors' Supplies 

(OLD TOWN) Tacoma, Wash. 

Main lilt 



CMnkTP<5 See that this label (in light blue) appears on the 
JlVlUIVC-iVO box in w hi cn y OU are served. 



Issued by AuUlonlyot the Oga/ Makers Inurnationai Union o: 

Union-made Cigars. 



lumiteMtMtithitd 



»»U««0HHt«A«»AUia'l«U«WT>0MlU«l3»< »•*';!•, ""J* 1 
tm»M of to N00M MAIUtlf iml iNTUUaw MlltM 0' 
Vmn G4in to m smoMn UwouoNwi m. void 

\.IM ml tt ftiglai HL 



Mfia.MI of Ikt HGR« MAUKIM Ji* INIUUCIWI KUIMl 0' ™f 
U*m Ewi lo ill jmoUn uraiixwl nx ««M 
All Wi*9«iwrU upoo Utt ittmi ml b« pojjlwd ****?$ *• '•"' 



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THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



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The Housing Bureau of the De- 
partment of Labor has awarded con- 
tracts for the construction of 1193 
houses at Bethlehem, Pa., and 100 
ready-cut houses at Seven Pines, 
i,Va. 

The Chicago school board is plan- 
ning to equip a 640-acre farm for 
practical training to supplement the 
farm-craft lessons given Chicago 
schoolboys by the Illinois division 
of the Boys' Working Reserve. 

fine American officer and ten to 
twenty men were killed in clash be- 
tween American and Mexican forces 
in the border town of Nogales, Ari- 
zona. It is estimated that 100 were 
killed on the Mexican side of the 
border by fire from the American 
side. 

Henry Ford, the Detroit manufac- 
turer, candidate for nomination for 
United States Senator, in both the 
Republican and Democratic primaries 
in Michigan, was nominated on the 
Democratic ticket, but is defeated 
for the Republican nomination by 
Commander Truman II. Newberry, 
former Secretary of the Navy. 

When the Dayton Wright Aero- 
plane Co., of Dayton, Ohio, turned 
out its thousandth aeroplane it de- 
veloped that the 6,000 men at that 
plant are turning out more fighting 
planes than any two factories in 
England or France. The daily and 
monthly output exceeds the combined 
output of the largest factories in 
those two countries, according to 
unofficial statistics sent to the De- 
partment of Labor. 

Mr. Benjamin C. Marsh, executive 
secretary of the American Commit- 
tee on the High Cost of Living, in 
an argument before the Committee 
of the House of Representatives, re- 
cntly, had this to say in favor of a 
measure providing for the public 
ownership of the coal mines, oil 
wells and other natural resources: 
"The main object is to reduce the 
cost of living, and we believe it can 
be done effectively and permanently 
only by Government ownership and 
operation of these natural resources." 

Plans for the organization of a 
national federation of manufacturers' 
councils to meet war-time and after- 
the-war emergencies, have been an- 
nounced by Warren C. King, presi- 
dent of the Manufacturers' Council 
of New Jersey, who states that the 
organization will be effected on the 
plan of the American Federation of 
Labor, embracing the principal of 
local organizations in all manufac- 
turing communities, which will form 
State councils. These, in turn, will 
furnish representatives for the Na- 
tional body. 

The Treasury Department urges 
liberty bond owners to have these 
bonds registered. Emphasis is placed 
upon the danger of loss from theft 
or destruction of the millions of 
bonds now outstanding. A rela- 
tively small percentage of bondhold- 
ers have means for keeping them 
safely, and as a result the bonds 
are kept in the homes where they 
might be stolen or destroyed. A 
coupon bond is as negotiable as cash 
ind any one can sell it. Once a 
bond is registered, however, this 
danger is eliminated and even 
though the bond is stolen or de- 
stroyed the original owner will re- 
ceive the interest at regular inter- 
val . and the principal in full at 
maturity of bond. The Treasury 
Department makes no charge for 
registering these bonds. Any bank 
!□ will give full information. 



14 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




Merritt & Chapman have raised 
the X. Y. P. & X. car float No. 2, 
previously reported sunk at Norfolk 
by collision with a steamer. 

Since the beginning of the war the 
losses of American vessels through 
enemy causes have been, up to the 
end of July, 1918, 117 vessels of 
319,5'»4 gross tons. The total loss 
of life on these vessels is 424. The 
tonnage sunk during the first 
months of this year is still 55,349 
gross tons below the total for 1917, 
and the number of vessels is less 
than half last year's toll. The loss 
of life so far this year is little more 
than one-third that of 1917. 

Universal Shipbuilding Co., Stur- 
geon Bay, Wis., has taken a contract 
to build three ocean-going tugs, 150 
feet long, at a price of approxi- 
mately $750,000, for the Emergency 
Fleet Corporation. The hulls will be 
of wood. The yards arc being en- 
larged and equipped for the con- 
struction of steel vessels and a com- 
plete boiler and structural shop 
equipment has been acquired for 
transfer to Sturgeon Ray. In ad- 
dition a small list of new equip- 
ment is being purchased. 

From Cleveland it is reported that 
ore has been sent forward at a 
record rate during the past three 
months. Very little grain, it is said, 
will be shipped this season, and con- 
sequently the lake movement from 
Lake Michigan ports will be heavier 
than usual. The crop will be ready 
early. It is expected there will be a 
fair movement from ports at the 
head of the lakes the latter part 
of September. There will be tonnage 
to move it, it is stated, and the .■ 
will be sent forward without delay. 
The Leathern & Smith Co., Stur- 
geon Bay, Wis., has laid keels for three 
of the six 100-foot tugs which it has 
contracted to build for the Emer- 
gency Fleet Corporation, and will 
lay the remaining keels before the 
end of the present month. Delivery 
is specified by June 1, 1919, and 
three are to be ready for service 
by May 1, next. The company has 
purchased considerable used equip- 
ment and some new transmission, 
hoisting and other machinery. The 
contract now in hand amounts to 
$960,000. 

The speed ship, "Tuckahoe," which 
was turned over to the Shipping 
Board ready for service in the 
record time of 37 days, continues to 
make fast time in the coal carrying 
trade between Hampton Roads and 
New England ports. Average num- 
ber of round trips for colliers has 
been two a month, but the "Tucka- 
hoe'' is making four, and on her last 
trip to Boston went in and out of 
port and discharged a cargo of 5000 
tons of coal within 31 hours. Aver- 
age of 19 colliers discharging cargoes 
at Boston during the "Tuckali 
visit was 135 hours and 54 minutes. 

The Shipping Board is recon- 
structing eleven lake ships lor trans- 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 29th, 1918 

Assets $59,397,625.20 

Deposits 55,775,507.86 

Reserve and Contingent Funds ------ 2,286,030.34 

Employees' Pension Fund ------- 284,897.17 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK, President 

GEO. TOURNY, Vice-Pies, and Mgr. A. Jl. K. SCHMIDT, Vlce-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T. KKUSE, Vice-President 

WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier 

A. H. ML'LLER, Secretary 
WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary 
GOODFELLOW, EELS, MOORE & ORR1CK, 
General Attorneys 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
JOHN A. BUCK A. it. R SCHMIDT A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY 1. N. WALTER E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. T. KRUSE HUGH GOODFELLOW ROBERT DOLLAR 



« j-i . ¥.« I • • ' Heldom, H. Holmes, Fred 

ban r rancisco Letter List gluten, a. h Holmgren, h. 

Henderson, Robert Hohiislrom, Carl A. 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Uftice are advertised tor three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from the date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
S. A. Silver, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



Aagaard, A. M. Anderson, Carl J. 

Aasanen, Geo. F. Anderson, C. N. 

niscn, Anton Anderson, F. V. 

AbrahamBon. a. w. Anderson. Gunnar 

Ackermaa, Valfred Andersson, Hilumg 



Henensen, A. 
Henriksen, C. 
Hildes. W. 
Hill -1387 

Hill, — -2030 
lliortli, Jens 
Hofman, P. 
Hogstiom, Harry 

II ling, Carl F. 
Isakson, John A. 



Holmstrom, D. B. 
Holt, Fredrick S. 
Hood, Chas. S. 
Horton, B. 
Howington. R. L. 
Hubbert, John L. 
Hunter, John Lee 



Ibsen, Marius 



Acosta, Miguel 
Adotfsson, John 
.Uilgren, \V . A. 
Alunsburg, — 
Aluvve. Joe 
Andersen, A. F. 
Andersen, H. 
sen. H 



Anderson, J. -Uo 
Anderson, Jack J. 
Anderson, jonn C. 
Anderson, Paul 
Andersson, A. T. 
C. Andersson, Erick 
i:>_'6 Andersson, uoturied 
-.'127 Andersson, J. R. 



Andersen, John -1246 

Andersen, M. -20S4 Andreas, Johannes 

Andersen, Nils P. Andresen, Jorgen 

Andersen, O. -1301 Antonsen, Marius 

Andersen, Rasmus Appelgvist, Jonn 

Anderson, All red N. Ask, Alfred E. 

Anderson, Andrew Ask, Lorentz 



Anderson, Albert 
Anderson, C. 



Augustine. Anthony 
Azarov, Daniel 



De Moss, E. 

Edmonds, John 
Edvarse, Frits 
Eglit, Brenz 
Ek, Chas. 
Ekelund, Rich. 
Eliassen, Adolf E. 
Ellerman, Chas. T. 
Engel. Paul 
Engellen, D. A. 
Engstrom, Ben. 
Erick, John 
Erickson, Aksel 
Erickson, Chas. 

Fagerlie, Odell 
Falk. Axel 
Feschlo, Paul 
Fieht, Arthur 
Fiek, Max 
Fildes. Wilfred 
Fisher, G. A. 

atlantic service and one large lake F? a i ns™rgh? e L ge 

ship for ocean coal carrying, making Flem - Knut 

twelve in all. The eleven ships arc 

undergoing such extensive 



Baah, M 

Babchuck, Ernest 
i.aekmau, A. 
Balm, C. F. 
Baggs. H. L. 
Bandel, Curt 
Larry, Dick 
l ..in v. Thus. 

Beckly, Christ 

Benrowitz, Felix 
Benson, Helge 
Bergesen, Uerger 
Berg, Sigfrid 
Bergstrom, J. 
Berner, Albert 
Bernstein, Hans 



Bjork, Martin C. 
Birhnes, Ole A. 
2055 Blalle, Ernest 
Blixt, Gus 
Blomgren, Carl A. 
Blomgren, Fred 
Blomgren, M. A. 
Blomkvist, Albert 
Blucker, John 
Borgen, Arne 
Borgesen, Oscar 
Bos, Johannes 
Brabower, Martin 
Brian, Jos. 
Biown. George W. 
Bru, Nils 



Bertelsen, Kristian Brunwald, Hairy 

on, Oscar Bunes, John 

Bertheleon, Charles Bye, Alf 



Biron, E. 
Bjorklund, Eric 

Calem, Anthony 
Call, Fred 
Carlsen. Albln 
Carlson, Carl 
Carlsen, Severin 
Carlson, C. S. 
Carsten, A. 
Carlstrand. Gustaf 
Cashin. J. B. 
Cassberg, K. G. A. 
Christensen, C. 



Bye, Didrick 
Bye, Kristian 

Christensen, Hans 
Chiisteuren, Ha- 1 y 
Christensen, II. C. 
Chi isteiisen, Osk» r 
Christensen, J. P. 

tiansen, L. P. 
Chrtstorfersen, C. 
on, 
Gunval 
Clarke, J. R. 
Crosiglio, Joseph 



Jacobsen, Jacob 
Jakobsen, Joakim 
Janerholm, Hans 
Janssou, Fredrlk 
Jensen, A. K. 
Jensen, Anton 
Jensen, Henry 

i, Jens G. 
Jensen, Johan F. 
Jensen, Lorentz 
Jensen, Oskar 
Jewett, Charles 
Johannesen, Helge 
Johannesen, Anthon Jones, Fred 
Johannesen, Johan Jordan, Henry 
Johansen, Asmus Jorgensen, Robert 



Johanson, Edward 
Johanson, Robert 
Jul. us en, G. 
Johansson, Bernard 
Johansson, John 
Johansen, \\ aimer 
Johndahl, Harry C. 
Johnson, Anton 
Johnson, John 
Johnson, Julius N. 
Johnson, Maddy 
Johnson, cue 
Johnston, Leslie 



Johansen, Chas. J. 
Johansen, Fritz 
Johansen, John 

Kaktin, Ed. 
Kailoerg, Arvld 
Kamp, Charles 
Karlson, August 
Karlsson, Johan 
(Carman, Wm. B. 
Kasklnen, A. 
Kelso, M. J.. 
Kinamon, Jack 
Kirpin, Matti 
Kive, Karl 
Kjellberg. A. C. 
Klink. Alfred 
Knapp, G. A. 
Knaut, Charles 

Labuhu, Frank 
Lagerquist, G. A. 
Langworthy, ErnestLittle, J. 



Jorgenson, J. 
Jurgens, A. 

Knechtman, W. 
Knudsen. Daniel 
Koch, Gottlieb 
Kokki, Emll 
Koppen, Bert 
Koppel, John 
Koisberg, Volmar 
Koskinen, Waino 
Kratton, R. M. 
Kristensen, L. P. J. 
Krishjan, K. W. 
Kruse, Chas. 
Kullborn, Oscar 
Kurgrel, ules 

Lindwall, Richard 
Linsner, Faul K. 



Dahlgren, W. A. 
IJalhstrom, Arthur 

II. 
Dahlstrom, Ernst 
Dahlstrom, G. M. 
Danielsen, John J. 
Daniels, L. M. 

Davidson, Waldemar Drasbek, Karl 
De Bara, Harry Dreyer, Jack O 



Delong. K. 
Dias, E. 

Dlswert, William 
Dobbin, Harry 
Dolan, C. 
Donk. Johan 
Dunwoody, Geo. 



Gonzales, Francisco Gundersen, Christ 



recon- 
struction that it amounts almost to 
building new vessels. By this pro- 
cedure, however, use is made of the 
existing hulls, engines and boilers 
which, when overhauled and repaired, 
will he nearly as good as new. as 
all damaged material is being taken 
out. In order not to interfere with 
new shipbuilding on the lakes, the 
vessels being reconstructed have hern 

nlnrprl mnotk ;„ „ tt • , Hansen, Oscar Hein. M. 

placed mostl} tn small repair yards. Hansei, Rangvald Heldal, Trygoe H, 



Garcia, Jose 
Garfield, G. 
Gjesdal, Filing 



Duncan, W. J. 

Erickson, Erik 
Erickson, George 
Erickson. John 
Erickson, L. 
Erickson, Nils 
Ericsson. Ernest G. 
Ernest, Edward 
Esterberg. Gust. 
Eucsen, Sigurd 
Evensen, J. L. 
Kvorsen. Hetter 
Ewin, Arthur 11. 

Folvlk. Carl L. 
Forgensen, H. R. 
Forslund, Fred 
Fraser, Alexander 

V. 
Fraser, James 
Fredriksen, B. D. 
Fredrlckson. M. 
Frost, Konge 

Grunrlman. J 
Gulbranson, B. 
Gulfeldt. A. 



Larsen, Alf 

Arthur 
Larsen, Gustav B. 
Larsen, H. 
J. 
Larsen, Lauritz 
Larsen, Theo. 
Larsen, Tonwald 
Larson, Cornelius 
Larson, L. A. 
Larson, William 
Leinasar, Jacob 



Loberg, Bror 
Lubbers, Henrlck 
Ludvigsen, P. L. 
Lund, Axel 
Lund, Christ 
J-.UUU, join. A 
Lundberg, Torsten 
Lundgren, C. ti. 

-16SB 
Lundmark, Helge 
Lundslrom, E. w . 
Lundquist, Axel 



Letchford, AlexauderLudwlgsen, A. 



Grant, August 
Grant, Lewis 
Gray, Hamilton 
Green. Laurence 
Grinberg, N. 
Groth, Charles 

sen, Henry 
Ilamm, R. 
Hannus, Peter 
Hantien, Charles 
Hansen. r"hris. 
Hansen. Harrv 
Hansen, Jargen 
Hansen. Johannes 
Ihinsen. M "S8 
Hansen, Oscar 



Gundersen, Hans C. 
Gusgron. Joseph 
Gustavsen, Anton 
Gussum, Joe 
Guthrie, R. 

Hansen, R. E. 
Hanson, Arthur 
Hanson, Karl J. 
Hanson, Edward 
Harko. Antoa 
Hauth. Carl 
Hawkins. C. A. 
Hay, C. W. 
Hazen. J. S. 
Hein. M. 



Lewis, Owen J. 
Liadel, Peter 
Lindblad, Conrad 

-M.iiJsen, Tom 
Magnusson, E. W. 
Mahler. Hans 
Makela, Andrew 
Maki, Ivar 
Malmgren, Oskar 
Malstrom, Erick 
Marklln, John 
Markman, Harry 
Martinsen, Nordal 
Marshall. E. K. 
Martinsen, John 
Mathiesen, Axel 
Mathlson, David 
Matson, K. A. 
AlcCormlck, Lau- 
rence 
Mi Donald, II. C. A. Moxnes, Christ" 
MeLeod, Norman A. 
Nannestad, A. 
Neilson, Jseil 
Nelson, Charlie 
Nelson, Ernest 
Nelson, Frank 
Nelson, Harold 
Nelson, N. P. 
Nelson, Kasmund 
Nelson. Steve 

n, Gustav A. Nolen, Axel 
NIcolaisen. Dtio Nordenberg, J. 

Nielsen, Carl C. Nordstrom. Bror 

Nielsen, E. S. -1116Nurkln, 11. 
Nielsen, Kristian Nuteher, Lyle P. 

Nielsen, Peter 
Oakley, Loren D. 
Uberg, Ebbe 
O'Conolly, Frank 
Ofeldt, C. 
Okesson, Erick 
(Hansen, Christian 



Lynch, James 
Lyngaard, George 

Mi Minus, Peter 
McNair, H. S. S. 
Melander, G. L. 

Melander, J. K. 
Meskell, -M. 
Mess, William 
Meyer, H. 
Milnor, C. D. 
Mirabal, Jose 
Mirttinen, John E. 
Mitt, Mikke 
Moller, K. A. 
Moller, S. O. 
Montiers, Joe 
Mortensen, B. 
Mulley, James 
Morrison, Philip 



Nielsen, Svend G. 
Nielsen, Jens 
Niewert, Aug. 
Nilsen, Fred. -520 
Nilsen, Hans L. 
Nllson, Hjalmar 
Nllsson, Hilding 
Noblanc. Louie 
Nolan, George 8. 



i, Verner 
Olesen, Ingwald 
Olsen, Amund 
Olsen. Aosgar 
i llsen, < 'harlev 
Olsen. E. F. -1280 



-478 



Olsen, H. 
Olsen, Hans 
olsen, Helmer EL 
Olsen, Herman 
Olsen, Ingvald 
Olsen, Iver 
Olsen, L. -861 

Olsen, Mandens 
Olsen, Nicola! 
Olsen, O. -1283 

Paavilalnen. A. J. 
Palhen, Geo. H. 
Palieen, Magnus 
Paulsen, Karl 
Parks, Leslie 
la rial, Olegario 
Pattenberg, John 
Paunu, J. 
Payton, M. C. 
Pedersen, H. -1263 



Olsen, Olai S. 
Olsen, Ole -1323 
Olsen, Regmar 
Olson. John 
Olsson, E. W. 
Olsson, Carl G. 
Oman, Victor 
Oseberg, Ansgar 
Ostergren, Josef 
Osterman, John 

Peterson, F. 

Peterson, Frank G. 

Peterson, Frederick 

H. 

Peterson, Gus 

Peterson, L. -1389 

Peterson, L. A. T. 

Peterson, Mauritz 

Peterson, O. -1551 

Peterson, Otto 



il. -1560 Peterson, R. T. 
Pederson, Carl Pctrsen, Hans P. 

Pederson, Charles Petterson. Einar E. 
Pedersen, Henry G. Pettersson, T. -1734 
Pedersen, M. G. Pihkala, E. 



Pedersen, Peter 
Pederson. Oluf 
Perkins, Will 
Perrin. H. 
Peters, B. 
Petersen, Aage 



Pllcher, H. J. 
Pint. G. H. 
Pokos. Wasili 
Pope, B. 
Powell, H. A. 
Prestergaard, W. 



Petersen, A. -1676 Price, William B. 
Petersen, N. -16S8 Putkka, Werner 
Petersen, Olav -1595 

Quickman, W. Quirage, Juan 

Radke, Paul Rod, Sakarlas 

Ram, E. Roe. Berger 

Kamstad, Andreas Roesberg, Chas. V. 

issen, Karl V. Roos, Yrjo O. 
Rasmussen, S. A. Rop, Albert 
Relmer, Peter M. 
Repson, Ed. 
Revheim, Oskar 
Riisgaard, Soren 
Rlngman, Carl V. 
Robertson, Robert 
Rod, Halfdan 



Rosenberg, Adolph 
Rosen, Valfrid 
Ruckmlch. A. 
Ruger, Harry W. 
Rundstrom, Albert 
Runnqulst. Gust. 
Ryan, Patrick 

Sorensen, S. C. 
Sorensen, Soren P. 
Spatz. K. 



Saarnio, Lennart 
Saharoft, J. A. 
Sahlin. Nils 

lorn. Konrad Stangeland, Peter 
Sandell. John A. St. Clair, Tho 
Sandholm, Fred H. Stein, Albert W 
Bandkvist, Eric 
Sandstrom. O. H. 
Sonne, Rudolph 
Sounders, O. 
Sarin, Charlies 
Sarin, W'iliielm A. 
Sassi, Vllho 
Schaab, Fred 
Schmidt C. 
Shahaken, John 
Simensen, Arne 
Simos, Antonio 
Simpson, L. C. 
Sjoberg, Silas 
Smedsvlg, Olaf 
Smith, Geo. C. 
Smith, John T. 
Solum, Magnus 
Sorensen, Jorgen 
Sorensen. O. E. 
Sorensen, L. A. 

Tanman, Robert Tilt, Clifford 

I'anum, Helge -973 Tomsen, Waldemar 

Terki, Anton Tomson, Charley 

Thee, Rudolf Toutt, Walter 

Thomas, Nelson Trigebretsen. T. 

Thorn, Edmund Triho, George 
T horngren, Chas. G. Trimmer, David 
Thorstensen, Blrger 

Uhlen, Jack 



Stork, C. 
Strandberg, John E. 
Stromblad. Olaf 
Strom, Karl O. 
Strybos, D. 
Stupurak. J. V. 
Sund, Alex 
Svanson, William 
Svendsen, Henry 
Svendsen, S 
Svensen. A. 
Svensson, John 
Sveeingsen, S. U. 
Swalnson, Edward 
Swanson, B. -2675 
Swanson, Emanuel 
Sweeney, Denis 
Swensen, Anker 
Swenson, Rubin 
Bwlnbauer, C. 



Valkonen, Veda 
Van Kordencordt, 

W. A. 
Vargas, Santiago 



Verkamman, M. P. 
Verkamo, J. J. 
Vlckery, Curtis 



Wichman, Daniel 
Wihavainen, Geo. 
Wilkinson, George 
Wilks, J. 



Wachter, John 

Wagner, Ralph W 

Wall, Alfred 

Wall, George 

Wallenstrand. HarryWlllberg, Chas. 

Wamser, A. Williams, John 

Wank, Roman A. Williams, T. C. 

Wannquist. Ernest Williams, W. 

Ward, Joe Wilson, Williams 

Weikman, William Winkler, Otto 

Weisshaar, Rudolph Wlschcar, Ernest 



Welsson, Emll 
Weltz. Hill 
Wesgard, Jens 
West, I. 
W.stvik, I. 
Wezwager, Andrew 

Zetergren, E. 



Wolters. H. F. 
Woodley, Clifford R. 
Wright, J. A. 
Wurst. Walter 
Wychgel, J. 



PACKAGES. 



Fagerberg, Ivan 
Frazer, Alex V. 
Hansen, Axel 
llolmroos, — 
lrmey, Fred 
Johnson, Carl 
Johnson, Ivar 
Jurgenson, Julius 
Kerr, H. J. 
MalmqulBl, E. J. 
Mortensen. J. C 



-2191 
Mourlce, Francis 
Nelson, A. -1092 
Olson. Knut 
Osterholm, John W. 
Paal, K. 
Smith, John T. 
Strom, Carl 
Thymes, Oscar 
Wesgaard, Jens 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



' Any member of the crew of "C. S. 
Holmes" who was present when Gust 
Fondahn was hurt near Cape Flat- 
tery when in tow of "Goliath" on 
the 3d of January, 1913, will please 
communicate with Attorney S. T. 
Hogcvoll, 627 Pacific Building, San 
Francisco, or with F. R. Wall, Mer- 
chants Exchange Building. 9-11-18 



WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

JOE WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 

Exclusively 

28 EAST STREET, near Market 
Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 1619 
Repairing Done While You Wait, by the Latest Machinery 

Work Called For and Delivered 
WE USE ONLY THE BEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 




THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 




WS.S. 



WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 

ISSUED BY THE 

UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 2ft, 35 and 50 cents per day, 
or $1.50, $2 to $2.50 per week, with all 
modern conveniences. Free Hot and 
Cold Shower Bath on every floor. Ele- 
vator Service. 

AXEL LDNDGREN, Manager 



Phone Garfield 2457 



HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 

Res., Randolph 27 
Office Hours, 9 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

JNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING. FURNISHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 

Prices. :: :: Union Made Goods Only. 

103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Jortall Bros. Express 

Stand and Baggage Room 
— at — 
212 EAST ST., San Francisco 
Phone Douglas 5348 



Kearny 3863 



JENSEN & NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



Residence, 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 

Phone Douglas 1415 San Francisco 



East Street No. 19, near Market 

TAILOR 

To the U. S. Navy 

GEO. A. PRICE 

(IS RIGHT) 

Blues— UNIFORMS— Whites 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING, ETC. 

500 Lockers Free San Francisco, Cal. 



French American 
Bank of Savings 

Savings and Commercial 



108 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

RESOURCES, $10,000,000 

Member of Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco 

United States Depository for 
Postal Savings Funds 

DIRECTORS 

G. Beleney J. M. Dupas 

J. A. Bergerot John Glnty 

S. Blgglnger J. S. Godeau 

Lfon Bocqueraz Arthur LeealW 

O. Bozlo Geo. W. MeNear 

Charles Cajpy X. D« Pichon 




Ask for this Label 
on Beer 



INTL UNION OF 
UNITED BREWERY and 
SOFT DRINK WORKERS 

OF AMERICA 
Asks you to write and speak to your 




Ask for this Label 
on Soft Drinks 



STATE ASSEMBLYMEN AND STATE SENATORS 

TO . 

WORK AND VOTE 

Against the Ratification of the National Prohibition Amendment 
to the Constitution 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 

716 MARKET STREET— at Third and Kearnv 



UNION MADE 
IN OUR OWN SHOP 



Represented by 
E. PEGUILLAN 




SUITS AND 
OVERCOATS 

to Order at Popular 
Prices 




JACOB PETERSEN & SON 
Proprletori 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 

IAN FRAWCTSm 



1918 EDITION 

AUDEL'S 



NEW MARINE ENGINEERS GUIDE 

With Questions and Answers — Price, $3.00 

EDW. QUINN, Phone Prospect 354 DALT HOTEL, 34 TURK STREET 



^WORKERS UNION/ 



Named Shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 

Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec -Treas. 




Boot and Shoe Workers' 



TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO ST., near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

'Nuf Sed 



Phone Douglas 3725 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 East Street, San Francisco 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 

OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSTON ST 
SAN FRANCTSCO 



Alaska Fishermen 
San Francisco. 



Anderson, Frank 
Anderson, Julius 
Blom, John 
Kroman, Emil 
Burg, John 
Damberg, A. A. 
Duggan, Thomas 
Israelsen, Isak 
Johnson, Emil 
Jarobsen, C. 
Johansen, H. 
Kjendalen, Ole V. 
Larsen, Olof 



Mittchel. Joseph 
Moberg, Oscar 
Nilsen, Olof 
Olson, Anskar 
Oseberg, A. A. 
Paulsen, Axel J. 
Simmonds, J. 
Steen, J. J. 
Sheldon, C. B. 
Tamirsor, Peter 
Wikman, Daniel 
Weber, Fred 
Weisham, R. 



News from Abroad 



Any person knowing the where- 
abouts of Gust Stemisen and II. 
Reinke, please communicate with At- 
torney S. T. Hogevoll, Pacific Build- 
ing, San Francisco. 8-28-18 



Olof Nilsson, born in Hufvulsvik, 
Jamtland, Sweden, year 1880, height 
5 ft. 8 in., brown eyes, dark brown 
hair; last heard from in 1909, on 
board S. S. "Kurrachee," Karrachi, 
India. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify his sister, Mrs. 
Nels Olson, 1033j^ W. First St., Du- 
luth, Minn. 8-21-18 

A. Ullman, second mate on board 
S. S. "Davenport" from March 1 to 
March 20, 1918, will please call im- 
mediately in relation to important 
matter, at the office of J. O. Daven- 
port, 112 Market St., San Francisco, 
Cal. 8-21-18 

Alex Johnson, mate of the steamer 
"Tahoc" in Dec, 1917, and Matt 
Johnson and T. E. Sjostrom, seamen, 
are inquired for by J. T. Smith, of 
M. Thompson Co., 112 Market St., 
San Frawcisco, Cal. 7-3-18 



The Spanish Government is con- 
sidering a scheme to organize the 
maritime service in Spain under 
Government control. Tt is intended 
to requisition all vessels for the 
transport of articles for national 
consumption. 

The Chinese river steamers "Charles 
Hardouin" and "Paul Beau," each 
1,671 tons gross, 909 tons net, built 
and engined by the Cie. Francaise de 
Nav., Nantes, in 1903 and both owned 
by the Canton Navigation Co., Can- 
ton, have been sold at Hongkong 
for $1,045,000 net, the purchasers 
paying an additional $260,000 for 
converting the boats into ocean 
steamers. 

The destruction of the machinery 
on several German steamships in- 
terned in Chilean ports by their 
crews is being investigated by the 
Chilean Government. The authorities 
have directed that extraordinary 
vigilance be taken to prevent the 
Germans from sinking more vessels 
and the Government has announced 
that the Germans will be held re- 
sponsible for the damage done. 

Copenhagen reports that the 
American Ambassador has applied 
to the Minister of Foreign Affairs 
to bring an action against the Afton- 
blatt for an article in which Presi- 
dent Wilson is characterized as "the 
Presbyterian war-god of the Demo- 
cratic money mob," and in which it 
was said that the Entente both 
feared and despised America. The 
Minister of Justice has expressed his 
wish that the newspaper be prose- 
cuted. 

The British Government announces 
that two royal air force officers, 
with two air mechanics, have flown 
from England to Egypt, a direct 
distance of 2,000 miles. Spare parts 
for the machine were carried and 
few stops were made for gasoline. 
The machine used was of a type 
that has seen service at the front. 
It is declared that the trip "was in 
every respect a piece of routine 
work and not a matter of special 
designing or organizing." 

Among the many important hap- 
penings of the past week the out- 
standing event was the brilliant vic- 
tory of the Americans at the St. 
Mihiel salient. There is not space 
in which to record all its wonderful 
features, and what American but has 
devoured every line of last week's 
dispatches? The first blow by a 
united American Army under Gen- 
eral Pershing, it swept through the 
Germans like wildfire. In less than 
two days, the whole salient was 
pinched off, the fighting line reduced 
by twenty-two miles, innumerable 
towns and villages were taken and 
with them about 20,000 prisoners. 
Berlin, in a screamingly funny dis- 
patch, said the evacuation was car- 
ried out without interference — one 
wonders what would have happened 
had the Germans been interfered 
with. Americans have covered them- 
selves with glory, and still greater 
glory lies ahead in the taking of 
Mctz. America is now more than 
the hope — she is the reality of vic- 
tory. Brilliant work was also done 
by the French and British, the latter 
bringing in 750 guns and 75,000 pris- 
oners in four weeks. How hard the 
British fighting must have been is 
seen in a week's casualty list of 21,- 
445. Altogether, the events of the 
week were a striking reply to the 
stalemate pessimists. No wonder the 
Kaiser and his cohorts are now 
squealing for peace. 



16 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits 



"Have you got a second-hand car, 
as good as new. for about one-quar- 
ter what a new car would cost?" 

"Yes'm, we've got just the one you 
want. It's being towed in now."— 
Life. 



"There are some queer ways about 
building operations." 

"How do you mean.'" 

"When a man wants to expand his 
building for business reasons he calls 
in a contractor."— Baltimore Amer- 
ican. 



"You men make a lot of work." 
"What is the matter, love?" 
"You keep me busy sewing buttons 
on your vest." 

"Well, dear, you feed me so well, 
was the diplomatic husband's re- 
sponse.— Louisville Courier-Journal. 

Remarkable Cur e.— Doctor— Did 
that cure for deafness really help 
your brother? 

Pat— Sure enough; he hadn't heard 
a sound for years, and the day after 
he took that medicine he heard from 
a friend in America.— New York 
American. 



"Some of you men who play poker 
day and night ought to be taken for 
loafing." 

"Playin' poker at Crimson Gulch,' 
answered Three-finger Sam thought- 
fully, "may be non-essential. But 
if you perteck your interests it ain't 
loafin'." — Washington Star. 



"Now, who was it that was not 
glad when the prodigal son returned 
home?" asked the teacher, expecting 
to hear the reply, "The elder brother." 
Instantly a little hand went up, and 
the teacher asked: "Who was it, 
Tony?" 

"It was the calf," came the confi- 
dent answer. — Tit-Bits. 



Sympathetic Old Lady (to con- 
vict) — Ah, my unfortunate friend, 
your fate is indeed a hard one; and, 
as she thinks of you here in this 
dreadful place, how your wife must 
suffer! 

Convict (very much affected) — 
Yes'm, and there are two of 'em, 
mum. I'm here for bigamy.— Tid- 
Rits. 



Children's Accounts 

Your children should be taught to 
save. Open an account for each of 
them to-day. Show them by example 
that you believe In a savings account. 

They cannot start too soon. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
mart. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and Its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how Ignorant the seaman may he, even In the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and In a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 




Christensen's Navigation 
School 

Established 1904 

257 HANSFORD BLDQ., 268 MARKET 

8TREET 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. 




SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront 
since 1 866 — over 50 years. Enough said. 

We DO NOT Supply Mattresses or Bedding to Vessels 

J. COHEN & CO. 



BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 



72 EAST STREET 



Opposite Ferry Post Office 



Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



HENRY HEINZ 



When You Buy 
from Us, Liberty 
Bonds are Ac- 
cepted for Cash. 



Phone Douglas 6762 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
Original Size 




SOLID GOLD $1.50 
GOLD FILLED .50 



Diamonds 

Watches - 64 market street 

High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



BUY 
MEN'S 

FURNISHINGS 
AT 




Market at Fifth 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 
Phone Kearny 619 

Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Boots, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing 

of All Kinds, Watches, 

Jewelry, Etc. 

676 THIRD STREET 

At 3rd and Townsend, San Francisco, Cal. 



Bagley's Gold Shore 

Packed in convenient pocket 
poucher. Contains more good 
Smoking Tobacco for the money 

than any package for*'the price. 
Why buy tin goods and pay extra 
for the tins. 



nion 
Made 



UNION LABEL SHIRTS 

AT FACTORY PRICES 
DIRECT TO WEARER 

EAGLESON & CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO, 1118 Market Street 
Los Angeles, 112-16 So. Spring Street Sacramento, 717 K Street 

Our Union Catalogue of Shirts and Furnishings 

Endorsed by San Francisco Labor Council 

San Francisco Building Trades Council 

San Francisco Label Section 

State Building Trades Council 



I Want You 
Seamen 
to wear 

Union 
Hats 

$2.50, $3.50 
$5.00 

"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

Deserves Your Patronage 




Union Store 
Union Clerks 



72 Market Street 

Next to Ocean Market 



Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Silverware 





ScwnoenCa 

715 MARKET STREET, Above Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Qames Ji.Sorensett 
ift*a. ana Jr ««j. i 
At the Big Red Clock 
and the Chlmee. 



Jewelers, Watchmakers, Opticians 

Big Stock — Everything Marked in Plain Figure* 

THE ONE-PRICE JEWELRY STORE 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 



BH> SEAL CIGAI CO., MANUrAtTUBCflS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 



CBftwsrm 

OVERALLS 8. PANTS 

UNION MADE -^ 

ARGONAUT SHIRIS 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXXII, N( 



SAX FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2?. 1918. 



Whole No. 2505. 



LIABILITY FOR SEAM EN'S INJURIES. 

The Urgent Need for a National Seamen's Compensation Law. 



Until such time as the Congress of the United 
States shall enact a general Federal compensa- 
tion law for Seamen it is virtually impossible 
to make any clear-cut statements regarding a 
vessel's liability for injuries sustained by sea- 
men. 

However, since the decision of the United 
States Supreme Court in the case of Jensen vs. 
Southern Pacific, and the more recent decision 
by the Court of Appeals of the State of Xew 
York in the case of Clarence P. Howland vs. 
State Industrial Commission, there has been 
established a community of interest as to negli- 
gence actions between seamen, longshoremen 
and ship-repair men. 

The courts have finally established that any 
work being performed pursuant to a maritime 
contract comes exclusively within the jurisdic- 
tion of the Admiralty law. It further decided 
that a longshoreman's contract to load a ship, 
is a maritime contract and a repair man's con- 
tract to repair a ship is a maritime contract; 
therefore employees of longshoremen or ship- 
repair men, working on board vessels pursuant 
to such contracts, are bound by the substantive 
Admiralty law as to their rights growing out 
of any accident while in the performance of 
their work. 

There has been no decision yet on the new 
act of Congress which extends to all maritime 
workers the benefit of any Workmen's Com- 
pensation Act which might by its terms give 
them a remedy. It has been definitely decided, 
however, that the substantive principles of mari- 
time law shall determine the rights of long- 
shoremen, ship-repair men and seamen as to 
all accidents on board ship. 

The Question of Maintenance and Cure. 

It was held in the recent case of Fullford vs. 
Jay Street Terminal, by Judge Ward sitting 
in the District Court, which Attorney Silas 
Blake Axtell of New York brought to trial 
this summer, that a longshoreman whose hands 
were frostbitten while loading a ship with a 
hand truck during the winter months, was not 
entitled to maintenance and cure as a seaman, 
although his work was maritime. 

The decision of the Supreme Court in the 
Jensen case and in the recent case of Chelentis 
vs. Luckenbach, which was carried to the Su- 
preme Court by Mr. Axtell, established definitely 
that the substantive Admiralty law determines 
the rights of the parties. As to the reined)', 
the longshoreman or seaman or ship-repair man 
may proceed in the common law courts and 
have the benefit of common law remedies, to- 
wit. a jury trial. 

In the decision of the United States Circuit 
Court of Appeals in this circuit in Chelentis vs. 
Luckenbach, Judge Ward in writing the opinion 
of the court, which was affirmed (with dissent- 
ing opinions) by the Supreme Court, held that 
a seaman might recover at common law for 
injuries sustained irrespective of contributory 
negligence on his part. 

It has always been one of the main axioms 
of the common law, that in an action for tort, 
the plaintiff cannot recover unless he is shown 
to be free from contributory negligence. In 
Admiralty cases, the more equitable doctrine 



of averaging the damage in proportion with 
the negligence of the respective parties, was 
adopted in the case of Max Morris, 137 U. S. 
1, a decision made about 1885 in the Southern 
District of Xew York by Judge Addison Brown 
and was affirmed by the Supreme Court of the 
United States. 

A "Right" Given by Maritime Contract. 

In the case of Holt vs. Cummings, 102 Pa. 
212, an old common law suit, it was held that 
a seaman could maintain a suit at common 
law for maintenance and cure or board, lodg- 
ing and doctor bills, a right given to him 
by his maritime contract. The decision of the 
Supreme Court in the Chelentis case, affirming 
the language of Judge Ward as to the change 
in the common law negligence rule, would 
seem to establish the provisions as to seamen 
at least, to be similar to the rule created by 
the language of the Federal Employees Liability- 
Act which in its terms states that workmen 
may recover irrespective of contributory negli- 
gence and irrespective of the negligence of fel- 
low servants as well. 

Judge Sheppard in the case of Friekson vs. 
Roebling's Sons, tried in New York during 
the past month, charged the jury on that 
point particularly. The attorneys for the de- 
fendant took an exception and it is possible 
that the question will be reviewed in a hig*her 
court. 

It was of course the contention of the plaintiff 
in the Chelentis case, that liability was created 
by Section 20 of the Seamen's Act through 
operation of the doctrine known as respondeat 
superior. In other words, the employer or 
principal is liable for the acts of his agent or 
employee done in his interest. Congress be- 
lieved that the bar to recovery in the "Osceola" 
case, 189 U. S., was the fellow-servant rule and 
a complete investigation of all decisions rendered 
prior to the "Osceola" decision indicates that 
the fellow-servant rule was the bar to recovery 
in each instance and that Judge Brown in writ- 
ing the opinion in the "Osceola" case merely 
stated what he thought to be the law. 

The Supreme Court seems to have taken the 
view that by the "Osceola" decision the liabil- 
ity of ship-owners was limited and that the 
doctrine of respondeat superior ceased to ope- 
rate. 

Another Supreme Ccurt Decision Necessary. 

To many it would seem that the law r on 

this particular point is becoming very much 

involved and that an appeal of a case like the 

Friekson one will be necessary before the situa- 

'tion will be finally clarified. 

A more recent ease which involves possibili- 
ties which may be important to seamen is 
that of Farrish vs. Mallory S. S. Co.. which 
was tried in August before Judge Mack in 
the United States District Court. The plaintiff, 
a colored longshoreman, fell through the hatch- 
way of the S. S. "Santiago" at Pier .36, North 
River, at about 7:40 a. m. before there was 
sufficient daylight in the hold to permit his 
seeing and before any light was provided by the 
company. 

It appeared that the storekeeper who had 
the key to the lamp room had not come on 



the dock and did not come until after the acci- 
dent. The plaintiff was ordered by one of the 
assistant superintendents to proceed with the 
work of getting the skids ready in the 'tween 
decks. While doing this work he fell through 
an open hatchway which was unguarded and 
unlighted. It appeared that he had not worked 
in the hold of this ship for nearly a year and 
that during that period the width of the 'tween 
deck hatch had been extended. He received 
no warning as to the change or that the hatch 
was open. He claimed it was so dark that he 
could not see. Over strenuous objection of 
counsel for the defendant that the place was 
reasonably safe and that the negligence, if any, 
was that of fellow-servants, the court sent the 
case to the jury. 

Attorney Axtell of Xew York, has supplied 
the Journal with a copy of the charge of 
Judge Sheppard in the United States District 
Court, Southern District of New- York, in the 
case (already referred to) of Erickson against 
John A. Roebling's Sons Company of New 
York. 

This is a suit which was started on behalf 
of the plaintiff, Alec Erickson, a member of 
the Seamen's Union, shortly after the case of 
Chelentis against Luckenbach, which was sub- 
sequently taken to the Supreme Court of the 
United States. ^ The action was commenced 
against Roebling's Sons Company, part owners 
of the schooner "Margaret Thurlow," at com- 
mon law, and was brought to trial in the 
month of August, 1918, at New York. 

Failure to Furnish Safe Appliances. 

This case, in which the facts are stated in 
the charge to the jury which is reprinted here- 
with, is distinguishable from the Chelentis de- 
cision because in that case, the negligence was 
predicated upon a negligent act of the seaman 
in command in failing to give a proper order 
in the handling of the vessel. In the Friekson 
case there was a negligent order given, but 
the negligence was that of the master in fail- 
ing to furnish and use proper and safe appli- 
ances. Tt is one of the duties of the owner 
to furnish a seaworthy vessel, safe appliances 
and equipment. The master is the owner's 
agent and responsible in the performance of this 
duty. He furnished to the workmen and di- 
rected that they use an appliance for the 
work which was unsafe, defective and worn 
out, causing the injury. 

This ca>e may be the open wedge to a 
broader statement of principles of Admiralty 
and common law, relating to torts on board 
ship, by our High Court. Mr. Axtell, who 
represented Erickson, believes that the judgment 
of Judge Sheppard will be sustained. 

hollowing is the interesting and instructive 
charge to the jury made by Judge Sheppard 
in the Erickson case: 

The Court (Sheppard, J.): "Gentlemen of the 
Jury, the case submitted to you and the one 
which you will try according to the testimony 
is the one made out in the plaintiff's petition 
or complaint in which he alleges certain injur- 
ies by reason of the negligence of the defendant 
Roebling & Sons. He charges in his petition, 
and that is wdiat you are confined to, you can- 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



not go outside of the record and speculate 
upon what injuries lie received or how those 
injuries were received, but you must look to 
his original declaration exclusively, and he sets 
forth in that that he was injured by reason 
of the negligence of the owners in supplying in- 
adequate and defective apparatus for discharging 
the cargo of the vessel. That a certain block 
of wood or stick of wood by order of the 
master who was agent of the owners in the 
premises at the time was adopted as a means 
of bearing up or holding up the ends of the 
timber or logs which were at the time being 
removed from the hold and discharged upon the 
wharf at Ponce, Porto Rico. 

"To that petition of the complaint the de- 
fendant denies all those allegations, that the 
master gave any such order that any such 
means by the consent or knowledge of the 
master or owners of the ship be used in the 
discharge of that vessel's cargo. So you have 
the plaintiff's case and the denial of that case 
as made by the defendant. 

Negligence is Basis of Action. 

"The basis of this action is negligence, negli- 
gence of the master, who was the agent of the 
owners in what? In supplying or furnishing 
insufficient and inadequate appliances for un- 
loading the vessel, to-wit, a certain block or 
stick which was used or adopted at the time 
for the removal of the cargo from the hold out 
to the shore. Negligence is that doing of 
something at a time and under circumstances 
which a reasonably prudent person would not 
do, or leaving undone or not doing a thing 
at a time and under circumstances which a 
reasonably prudent person would do. And that 
you must find as the basis of the action of the 
plaintiff which would entitle him to recover in 
this case on negligence, and that definition of 
negligence applies as well to the plaintiff under 
the facts in this case as to the defendant, be- 
cause, under the law as we conceive it as now 
adopted by the courts of this country in a 
case of this sort brought by a seaman against 
a vessel, the rule of contributory negligence is 
applicable to the plaintiff as it would be even 
though his suit was strictly in Admiralty or 
maritime courts. So consequently that rule of 
negligence applies to him as well as to the 
defendant. 

"So in addressing your attention to the testi- 
mony in this case you are confined to the 
evidence. T may say to you that whatever 
verdict you find or do not find, you are not 
to give regard to any other case or to any 
opinions of law which counsel might enter- 
tain, or any views they may have expressed 
as to the opinions of other courts, but you 
are to take the law from this court, be it 
correct or incorrect. This is the forum that 
gives you the law that governs your delibera- 
tions upon the facts in this case. 

"So you first address your attention to what 
caused the injury and whether or not it was 
a defective block or stick which was used and 
adopted at the time for the removal of the 
particular log which by some circumstances let 
slack in the chain which this plaintiff was con- 
trolling at the time that caught his finger and 
cut off his fifigcr. 

"Then you go further and ascertain whether 
or not if this block of wood was the cause of it, 
whether it was an article or a means supplied 
by the master, because the owners would not 
he responsible for the act of negligence in the 
hold or aboard ship except for that of the master 
in the supplying the stick, he being the agent 
of the owners at sea and competent in all 
matters to give directions and to supervise the 
control and conduct of the ship, just so the 
law makes the owners responsible for his acts. 
Therefore, if you find that it was the inadequate 
means of lifting the log out of the hold 
which caused the slack in the chain that caught 
the man's hand and cut off his finger, whether 
or not that was an article supplied by the master 
and whether or not it was the proximate cause 
of the injury, the inadequacy, the negligent 
manner of the operation of that thing was the 
proximate cause of the injury, or whether it 
was the carelessness of the plaintiff or the con- 
tributory negligence of the plaintiff which was 
the proximate cause of the injury. 

Ascertaining the Facts in the Case. 

"Then, if you find it was a negligent act 
under the circumstances, that this was an im- 
provident way of unloading the vessel and that 
means was adopted by order of the master, 
then you will next inquire wdiat part of the 
plaintiff's conduct, care or lack of care at the 
time entered into the act of the chain becom- 
ing slack and catching his hand. 

"You have heard all the evidence. You have 
heard the testimony of the plaintiff and you 
have heard it corroborated by some other wit- 
nesses, that the master went into the hold and 
picked up this piece of wood and that he 
placed it in position and showed them how 
and demonstrated how it should be done with 
a view to facilitating the removal of the cargo 
from the hold. 

"You will remember from the testimony that 
that is positively denied by the master, and 
there is also the testimony of other witnesses 
that corroborated the fact that the captain did 
n ot go into the hold, nor did be make any such 
demonstration or any such order. There is a 
conflict in the testimony which I will comment 
on a little later, but you remember the plaintiff's 
testimony which said that he was standing at 
the hatchway with an unobscured view into the 



hold and that lie saw the master when he did 
this, when he picked up this piece of wood him- 
self which he says broke under the strain and 
under the weight of the log which caused the 
slack in the chain to catch his hand. If he 
was looking at that and if he was an experienced 
seaman, and if that was something new and out 
of the ordinary and something unusual, then 
you will inquire whether he had the opportunity 
of seeing and knowing what was being done, 
and knowing that it was an unusual thing and 
that it was liable to cause the very thing to 
happen which did happen, and he went on and 
worked with that knowledge, then did he not 
contribute to his own injury? If you find that 
he was cognizant of the danger or knew that 
it was liable to do what it did do, and there- 
fore he was negligent himself and that his negli- 
gence contributed to his injury, then you would 
take into consideration that negligence of his in 
ascertaining the amount which he would other- 
v. is recover if he were not negligent himself. 
That is to say, you are confined in this case 
and in this action to a reparation to plaintiff 
for his loss, his pecuniary redress, for the loss 
of the use of that hand in the employment in 
which he was engaged at that time, his dimin- 
ished earning capacity by reason of the injury, 
and the physical suffering that he endured in 
the hospital, and vou are confined to that and 
that alone in this action as a matter of re- 
dress. 

"Therefore you take that as the basis of what 
you consider would be his earning capacity of 
both hands and what you now consider is his 
diminished earning capacity with the loss of two 
or three lingers on the one hand, and then find 
what would compensate him for the number 

ars that he would have followed that 
vocation at the pay that he was getting, allow- 
ing him whatever he is likely to lose as a re- 
duction of wages from what he would haye 
got with both hands. And in addition to that 
such sum as you think would be adequate com- 
pensation for ids physical suffering by reason 
of the pain and anguish that he suffered while 
in the hospital and while these operations were 
being performed. Then when you ascertain what 
that amount is, inquire how much did he con- 
tribute to the injury himself, and if his own 
negligence contributed 50 per cent., you will de- 
duct from whatever you would allow him other- 
wise, ?u per cent., but if you find that his negli- 
gence was not equal to that of the defendant 
and was much less, then reduce the defendant's 
allowance from what you would have given 
him otherwise by whatever you think would 
be in proportion to his own negligence which 
contributed to his injury. 

The Question of a Future Operation. 
'Plaintiff would not be entitled to recover 
for any future operations that may be necessary 

his hand, lie is confined in his recovery 
to the loss of the use of that hand as the means 
of earning a living, to his capacity of earning a 
livelihood and for his anguish and for his physical 
suffering. If the defendant sent him to a reputa- 
ble hospital and provided hospital relief and physi- 
cians and surgeons and by reason of the negli- 
gence of the physicians or surgeons in that 
hospital he suffered otherwise and may have to 
undergo another operation docs not enhance 
his damages; that was not in the contempla- 
tion of the owners as a consequence, if they 
were negligent, and according to the well-set- 
tled rule of law that would not be a consequence 
.of the injury which the defendant would be 
bound to repay him for, and if there was any 
responsibility it would he that of the hospital 
or the surgeon who negligently operated on him 
and left him in that condition. 

"So now in considering the testimony, you 
have, as I have intimated to you, a direct con- 
flict between the master and the plaintiff him- 
self. The master denies that he ever put any 
such operation into effect. lie denies, I believe, 
if I heard his testimony, that he knew or had 
any knowledge that they were unloading the 
vessel with these sticks. There is some testi- 
mony that corroborates him. As against that 
you have the testimony of the plaintiff, who 
says that he was looking at the master when 
he put that stick up and got it out of the 
dunnage and brought it and set it up and some 
of the witnesses corroborate that, and told him 
that was a means which would facilitate getting 
the cargo out of the vessel. There are other 
conflicts in the testimony. It is the peculiar 
province of the jury to reconcile the conflict 
in the testimony of witnesses, if they can, with 
what they believe to be true in the light of 
what seems to them to be credible; anil what 
you think from your own common sense and 
experience is the most probable and most reli- 
able under the circumstances. If you cannot 
reconcile the conflict of the witnesses with what 
you believe to be true, then it is your province 
to discredit that which vou think is unworthy 
of belief in the light of all the testimony, in 
the light of your own experience and your own 
common sense and accept that which seems most 

aide and most practicable and most proba- 
ble and which corresponds more with your ex- 
perience in everyday affairs and determine the 
case according to your own view of what 3-011 
think is true under all the circumstances in 
the case. And when you thus arrive at your 
verdict by that standard you will find whatever 
vou think will compensate the plaintiff as T 
have given you the law for his loss in the 
earning capacity which he otherwise would 
have had had he both hands. 



'There is no evidence here as to what he 
paid the doctor or what he paid to hospitals; 
therefore, that is not any element of recovery, 
but the only matter that is submitted to you is 
that one question of what would compensate 
him for the loss of the use of that hand or the 
partial use of that hand, and for his physical 
and mental suffering during the time that he did 
suffer with the injuries and allow him a ver- 
dict for that amount, and, as I say, if you find 
that he contributed to his own injury so reduce 
that verdict in proportion to what you think 
his negligence contributed." 

The jury, in its verdict, awarded twenty-five 
hundred dollars to the plaintiff, Alec Erickson. 



STURDY STOCK. 
( By Henry A. McAnarney.) 

There have been more than 2,000,000 
sturdy men between the ages of 21 and 
31 withdrawn from productive industries 
in the last year — men whose positions can- 
not be filled by women. And these fig- 
ures are for the United States alone. They 
do not take into account the limitation of 
the labor supply through the natural cessa- 
tion of immigration, because of the amalga- 
mation of the immigrant class with the 
fighting forces of Europe. 

The United States must recoup the in- 
dustrial deficit of the entire world — a her- 
culean undertaking in normal times; titanic 
in the present day. Yet a task which the 
country faces with calm assurance of ac- 
complishment. 

The nation has faith in the loyalty, the 
patriotism and the capacity of its reserve 
working forces to overcome the gigantic 
barriers that obstruct the way. The time 
has come when that faith must be justi- 
fied. 

The nation's fighting forces have proved 
their mettle on the battlefield overseas ; 
demonstrated it to the confusion of the 
sneering cynics at home; to the bewilder- 
ment of the Prussian military strategists — 
those superman mathematicians who rid- 
dled with diagrams and drivel, maps and 
mucilage, ink and idiocy, the plan of the 
United States to land an army of a million 
fighting men on European soil in fewer 
than five years. 

Those "masters of the arts of war" had 
put it down in figures that this could not 
be done ; every fact of history denied its 
possibility. They made merry over the 
mere suggestion. A contemptuous shrug 
of the shoulders dismissed the United States 
as a factor in the war. 

But the United States did that — and 
more. In one year there were a million 
and a half Americans fighting on the West- 
ern front of France. 

That was a triumphant thrusting aside 
of "facts and figures," and a new scale for 
guiding scientific calculation. A success- 
ful climax to a stupendous undertaking. 

Now the working men and women of the 
country are called upon to duplicate in the 
field of industry the valor and the courage 
that our troops have shown on the field of 
battle. 

Our workers are courageous. They know 
that the war must be won. They realize 
that their forces of will and their indomi- 
table determination, are the guardians of 
universal liberty. They are confronted by 
the supreme obligation of supporting our 
magnificent fighting forces overseas with 
munitions and supplies of war, of feeding 
the nation's Allies, of keeping the whole 
machinery of life in motion. 

Shall they fulfill that supreme obligation 
voluntarily and vigorously? 

They shall ; for they come of the sturdy 
stock that stand by their guns when their 
country calls. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Government vs. Private Control. 

Untangling a freight blockade of 180,000 
loaded cars on Eastern lines was the first 
work of the United States Railroad Admin- 
istration, says Director General of Rail- 
roads McAdoo in a report to the Presi- 
dent on things accomplished in seven 
months of Government-controlled railroads. 
The report indicates that the Director Gen- 
eral believes he and his associates have 
brought order out of chaos at a most criti- 
cal period of the nation's life and he right- 
fully proclaims this fact. 

Other features of the report include sur- 
prising economies affected while efficiency 
has been developed to a high degree. This 
efficiency is indicated bv the statement that 
the northerly trunk lines are used for 
through trains between the Chicago dis- 
trict and the East, thereby releasing the 
more southerly trunk lines to handle the 
traffic that originates in the Pittsburgh dis- 
trict, where "congestion of local and 
through freight in the past has created 
some of the most costly and exasperating 
blockades that have been known in the 
history of American railroads." 

The Director General says that as "no 
man can serve two masters" the presidents 
and other officers of the railroad companies 
were released and their places filled by of- 
ficials directly responsible to the Director 
General. This leaves the presidents free 
to protect the interests of stockholders and 
owners. 

Under private control of the railroads 
2,325 officers, drawing salaries of $5,000 a 
year or over, were employed, with aggre- 
gate salaries of $21,320,187. Under Govern- 
ment control 1,925 officials (a reduction of 
400) are doing the same work, and the ag- 
gregate of their salaries is $16,705,298 — an 
annual saving of $4,614,889. This includes 
the officers of the regional districts as well 
as the central administration in Washing- 
ton, except the Director General himself, 
Avho receives no salary. 

Under private control salaries as high 
as $100,000 a year were paid. Now the high- 
est salaries are paid to the regional direc- 
tors (of whom there are but seven), and 
these range from $40,000 to $50,000 a year. 

The expenses of law departments have 
been reduced about $1,500,000 annually 
without impairing the efficiency. 

Competition has been abandoned and the 
consolidation of ticket and freight offices 
has saved over $16,000,000. Discontinuance 
of advertising has effected another saving 
of $7,000,000. 

Many unnecessary passenger trains have 
been eliminated. In the territory west of 
Chicago, and the Mississippi River passen- 
ger trains traversing an aggregate of 21,- 
000,000 miles a year have been done away 
with, and in the Eastern district the saving 
approximates 26,500,000 miles annually. 
( )ther unnecessary trains arc being an- 
nulled, the hauling of special trains and 
needless private cars has been discontinued 
and through travel is being directed to the 
natural routes. Now tickets are good on 
any route that directly reaches the point de- 
sired. 

The same policy is being applied as rap- 
idly as possible in the consolidation of 



freight terminals, with a saving of switch- 
ing costs that will permit of the more rapid 
loading and unloading of freight cars. 

The Director General shows that freight 
traffic from Los Angeles to Dallas and 
Fort Worth has been shortened over 500 
miles because routing via the Southern 
Pacific Railroad has been abandoned. Oil 
shipped from the Casper, Wyo., fields to 
Montana and Washington points is routed 
880 miles shorter, and a new route between 
Kansas City and Galveston has been de- 
veloped which is 280 miles shorter than the 
1,121 miles previously traversed. These 
instances indicate what is being done to 
shorten hauls and make possible the more 
intensive employment of both rolling stock 
and equipment. 

To further illustrate the terrific waste 
under private control, the Director General 
says that during a period of about 60 days 
some 8,999 cars were re-routed in a certain 
Western territory so as to effect a saving 
in the mileage traveled by each car of 195 
miles, equal to a total of 1,754,805 car 
miles. 



Urge Control of Packers. 

The farmers' national committee on 
packing plants and national industries has 
asked President Wilson to take over the 
various facilities of the meat packers 
named in the recent report of the Federal 
Trade Commission. 

"It is our opinion," the farmers say, 
"that the recommendations made by the 
commission are peculiarly wise and timely, 
and that if enacted into law so as to be 
permanent in effect they will break down 
the monopolistic tendencies, open up a 
field of fair competition, correct most of 
the abuses of which we complain as pro- 
ducers, and lead to economies in produc- 
tion, shipment and treatment of livestock 
and meat products that will secure benefits 
to the consumers. 

"Certainly the stock yards, the private 
cars and the distributing centers for meat 
cannot be considered as other than dis- 
tributing facilities in connection with the 
railroads. The logic of the situation is 
obvious and in our opinion the assump- 
tion by the railroads of their proper ter- 
minal functions will prove the remedy 
that we earnestly desire." 



No Chinese Needed to Save Wheat Crop. 

The United States Employment Service 
reports that workers within the western 
wheat States provided all the labor used 
in gathering the wheat harvest this sum- 
mer. 

This announcement shatters the doleful 
predictions of advocates of Chinese immi- 
gration, who talked of importing a million 
Orientals to save the wheat from certain 
destruction. 

Of the farm workers engaged, over 18,000 
or more than one-half of the total number 
of emergency workers, were placed on the 
farms and directed by the employment 
service. 

That the harvest should have been ac- 
complished entirely by local effort is proof 
what organization and local enterprise can 
(Continued on Page K).) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 

International Seamen's Union of America, 328- 
332 West Randolph St., Chicago, I1L 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 
Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National • des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes des France, 33 Rue Grange 
aux-Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord, 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fryboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundt, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten 1 B., Sweden. 
DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade IS, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhavn 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nationale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 

SPAIN. 

Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo des Emprcgados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's Worker. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



The recent legislative assembly of 
the Province of British Columbia en- 
acted a law establishing a minimum 
wage board to ascertain the wages 
paid to women in the Province, and, 
if after investigation it appears that 
inadequate wages are being paid in 
any occupation, trade, or industry, 
to call a conference for the purpose 
of determining what is a suitable 
wage and to establish and enforce 
the same. The board is to serve 
without pay, and to hold office dur- 
ing the pleasure of the lieutenant- 
governor, who also makes the ap- 
pointments, One of the three mem- 
bers is i" be a woman, and the 
deputy minister of labor i^- to be a 
member ex-ofncio and chairman of 
the board. 

\'"\a Scotia trade unionists have 
given notice that they will oppose 
the importation of Chinese labor into 
the (ape Breton mines. Govern- 
ment officials who favor this plan 
are advised to visit the mines instead 
of relying on second-hand informa- 
tion. It is shown that there are 
between 100,000 and 200,000 tons of 
coal banked at the minis. Formerly 
this coal has been cleared away 
in the summer, but because of lack 
of transportation it is now men- 
aced by the danger of combustion. 
If the present pile is not removed, 
the unionists say, the outlook is that 
the mines will have to close down 
this winter, and instead of discussing 
the importation of Chinese, officals 
will have an out-of-work problem to 
keep them busy. 

On December 8, I'M 7. the Federa- 
tion of the German Building Trades 
Workers made an investigation of 
the wages of its members. The in- 
vestigation included 90,000 workmen 
and covered all Germany, The re- 
sults showed that at the time of the 
investigation the average hourly wage 
rate of masons was 95 ' pfennigs 
(22.X cents) and that of helpers 85 
pfennigs ( -''>.-' cents), representing an 
average increase of 87.6 and 88.9 per 
cent., respectively, over the pre-war 
wage rates. The average hourly 
Wage rate of excavation laborers was 
found to be S2.5 pfennigs (19.6 
cents i, that of cement workers 103.7 
pfennigs (24.7 cents), of plasterers 
14o. (i pfennigs (33.S cents), and of 
stone-floor layers and terrazzo work- 
ers 144.4 pfennigs (34.4 cents). 

The May (1918) number of the 
Szakszervezeti Ertesito, the official 
organ of the Hungarian trade-unions, 
contains the statement that in l f, 17 
the number of organized workers 
in Hungary increased to 215,222. Be- 
fore the outbreak of the war the 
Hungarian trade-unions had a mem- 
bership of 107,4X6. The drafting of 
members into military service re- 
duced the membership to 43,3X1 at 
the end of 1915. This crisis was 
overcome in 1916. during which year 
the membership increased to 55,338. 
In the past year, however, this num- 
ber ha- been nearly quadrupled. The 
great propaganda work of the Hun- 
garian trade-union- dates back to 
the peace demonstration on May 1. 
1917. If it is considered that in- 
dustry and legal protection of the 
right of coalition are equally unde- 
veloped in Hungary, the rapid prog- 
of the Hungarian trade-union 
movement becomes particularly note- 
worthy. Of the l\~i,lll organized 
workers 166,411 were men and 48,- 
811 were women. The number of 
female trade-union mi mbers is nearly 
five times a- large as in pre-war 
times. 



M. BROWN & SONS 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florshcim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



SATISFIED CUSTOMERS ARE OUR 
BEST ADVERTISERS 

S. G. SWANSON 

Established 1904 
For the BEST there Is In TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
20 Floor, BanKot San Pedro, 110 W 6th St. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront, Cat. 



LIPPMAN'S 

Head to Foot Clothiers for Men 

Fourteen Years in San Pedro 

532 Beacon Street 

531 Front Street 

Two Entrances 



FRERICHS NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

529'/ 2 BEACON STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

Seafaring people who desire to take up navigation, San Pedro, situated In the sunny 
south Is the Ideal place. Captain Frerlchs has established a Navigation School here 
and under his undivided personal supervision students will be thoroughly prepared 
to pass successfully before the United States Steamboat Inspectors. 

TERMS ARE REASONABLE 



The Anglo- California Trust Company 

As successors to the SWEDISH-AMERICAN BANK 
offers a particularly convenient service to 

SEA FARING MEN and to the SCANDINAVIAN PEOPLE 

in California 

ANGLO-CALIFORNIA TRUST CO. 

Main Office: Northeast Cor. MARKET and SANSOME STREETS 

BRANCHES: 

16th and Mission Streets Fillmore and Geary Streets 

Third and Twentieth Streets 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $ 1,910,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 17,000,000 

COMMERCIAL SAVINGS TRUST 



NOTICE. 

The following named members, in 
order to comply with the military 
regulations, should at once call or 
write to the Sailors' Union office 
tor their questionnaire: 

AaUa, Albert 
Aallu. Henry B. 
Abrahamson, A. W. 
Anderson, Sven 
Axelsen. J. H. 
Baardsen, Hans M. 
Berystrom, John E. 

■ a. Jan 
Burg, John 
Byglln, o. O. 
Carlsen, H. C. 

:. ICinar G. 
Castro, Julian F. 
Kliasson, J. E. 
Ulllson, Morris 
Erlsen, John 
Hansen, Johannsen 
Hansen, B. P. A. 
Hermann, Carl E. 
laeobson, Malt 
| Jansson, K:\rl H. 
Jansen, Bernh, 
Jensen, Frank 
i-'iiry 
Johnsen, Cart G. 
txilne. Frank I... 
I.udwlg. Nil!" H 
Lundstrom. E. \V. 
Lund. John A. 

John 
Makla, Anden 
Matliiesen, Axel 



Nlelson, Hans 
Nllsson, Nils H. 
Odenberg, Adolph 
Olsen, Nicola! 
Olsen. Clalo 
■ Haen, ESmll 
olsen. Mandlus 
Olsen, Angar M. 
Olsen, Ragnar 
Olson, Knut 
Ostergard, Frank 
Pederson, C. E. 
Peterson, Conrad 
Pettersen, Elnar E. 
Rasmussen, R. H. 
Rasmussen, L,. A. 
Rod, Sakarlas 
Roed, HJalmar 
Rotter, Jack 
Rontved, O. J. 
Schellenz, Charles 
Schlppman, H. C. 
Slge, Herman 
Stovm i . Anders B, 
Strasdin, Paul 
Tanum, Helga 
Wall, Alfred 
Wamser, Christian 
Wllcke. J. W. G. 
Wllhelmson. John 
Zwart, A. 



CUT THIS OUT! 

and send it with 25c and receive by re- 
turn mail Regular Dollar Size Package 
of our Famous Egyptian Beauty Cream, 

CREMONILE 
A Beauty Builder of Highest Order. 
You will be moie than delighted with 
the result. 

S. J. CHURCHILL CHEMICAL CO., 
Beaumont, Texas 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention The Sea- 
men's Journal. 






">"-£v 



$$ 



i ? 







They're in to Win 



Fair targets, every one of these men, for the 
German riflemen and machine gunners hidden 
behind the parapet. 

But they are not thinking of the bullets whizzing 
past them; of the shelL bursting over their heads. 

They are intent on one thing — to scale that bank, 
fake the bridge head and win the day. 

And these men are made of the same stuff as all 
true Americans who read these words. 



If we are the 
same stuff, let 

us prove it. 

Let us get 
into the fight 
as they do— to 

the limit — 
for Victory! 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



A total of $50,000 has been subscribed by 
business men of Everett, Wash., to establish the 
Hyde Wooden Shipyards near that city. 

The Pacific Marine Iron Works, Portland, 
Ore., has leased a large site near the .Morrison 
Street Bridge, which will be equipped as a fitting 
out dock for vessels now under construction. 
Three slips, each 112 by 312 feet, will he built. 

The alien enemy inspection detail of the Navy 
is making a vigorous warfare against slackers 
on the water front, who exist by virtue of their 
panhandling methods. The officials say there 
is no excuse for men of sturdy physical condi- 
tion to live on homeward-bounders and all will 
be rounded up and given an opportunity to 
work or enter military service. 

The United States Shipping Board is planning 
for the construction of a drydock at San Pedro 
Harbor, Los Angeles, which, it is understood, 
will be used for repairing vessels in connection 
with the plants of the Southwestern Shipbuilding 
Co. and the Los Angeles Shipbuilding & Dry 
Dock Co. An appropriation of $204,000 has been 
made for the dredging of a dry dock channel at 
the harbor and $130,350 for a connecting chan- 
nel to facilitate operation. 

The "Georgina Rolph" of the Rolph fleet has 
been towed to San Francisco and is now being 
equipped with machinery at the Alameda plant 
of the Bethlehem Steel Corporation. Captain 
I. X. Carlsen, who has charge of the installation 
on all of the ships of the Rolph concern, said 
the "Georgina" would be a coal-burner. All of 
the other vessels have been fitted to burn oil. 

A syndicate in which George Watson of 
Victoria, B. C, is manager, will build a floating 
drydock to be constructed in sections so thai 
additional sections may be added. 

A number of Eastern business men were at 
South Bend, Wash., recently, looking over the 
plant of the South Bend Shipyard Co. They 
were favorably impressed with the location of 
the site and consider it one of the best on the 
coast. A movement is on foot for the con- 
solidation of the Kleeb Lumber Co. and the 
Willapa Harbor Iron Works with the shipyard 
plant. The first keel at the shipyard plant was 
recently laid. The ship to be built will be 250 
feet long, 43 feet beam and 22 feet depth 'of 
hold. It will be of the American auxiliary 
schooner type. 

One of the sailing ships owned by the Alaska 
Packers' Association and commandeered by the 
United States Shipping Board went ashore near 
Katsura Chiba, on the coast of Japan, September 
17, according to a cablegram received at San 
Francisco. Captain l.arsen and his crew, ex- 
cept one man, were taken ashore. The ad- 
vices did not state whether the sailor was 
left on board on purpose or was lost. The ship 
sailed from Manila for this port July 15 and 
is supposed to have encountered a tvphoon. 
At last reports it was hoped that aid will arrive 
in time to save both ship and cargo. The 
latter is valued at more than $1,000,000 and 
consists of hem]), coconut oil and other Oriental 
goods. 

The new Liberty plant of the Bethlehem Ship- 
building Corporation at Alameda, Cal., when 
completed, will be one of the largest shipyards 
in the United States. It will be twice the size 
of the Victory plant of the Bethlehem Ship- 
building Corporation at Squantum, Mass., and 
will involve twice the expenditure. The plant, 
which will have ten shipways, will cover more 
than a third of a square mile and from 3,000,000 
to 4,000,000 yds. of dredging will h c necessary. 
Large vessels will be built, contracts for which 
have already been awarded by the United States 
Shipping Board. Contract for the construction 
of the plant was awarded to the Aberthaw Con- 
struction Co., Boston, which recently Completed 
the Victory plant in record time. 

To meet the increasing demands for coal for 
steam and domestic purposes, the plant of the 
King Coal Company at Oakland, Cal., adjoining 
the big plant of the Moore Shipbuilding Com- 
pany, is being expanded to bring up its coal 
handling capacity from 2000 to 4000 tons a day. 
-Modern appliances are being installed for the 
rapid unloading of the cars of coal as they 
arrive from Utah. The company handled 50,000 
tons of coal in August, an increase of 10^000 
tons over July, and indications are full-, h( ),'()( in 
tons will be handled this month. Presidi nt 
James B. Smith and Consulting Engineer I. S 
Rosener of the coal company were at the piant 
recently superintending the improvements. Rose- 
ner is also consulting engineer of the Moore 
Shipbuilding Company. 

That surplus of sugar at Hawaiian ports is , 
thing of the past was the official announcement 
made by the Matson Navigation Company ( 
tain Peter Johnson, now assisting Port 
Uiarles W. Saunders, said that all of the 
sugar that was heaped up and waiting for ship- 
ment has been loaded into the ships, and the 
only sugar now remaining in Hawaii is that 
""< crlls, '«l from the cane. There will be about 
100,000 tons more of this and the crush will not 
conclude until about th r r,,st of the year. Mean 
time, the licet will be used to bring the canned 



pineapples to the mainland and also the few 
bananas. The shipping situation between the 
mainland and Hawaii is now satisfactory to all 
concerned, with the exception of the passenger 
'ravel. There is no indication that travelers 
will be permitted to go and come at will for a 
long time. 

The Pacific Steamship Company will extend 
the preparations for exploiting American trade- 
to the Orient, according to advices received from 
Seattle at the San Francisco office. General 
Manager A. F. Haines announced that R. I). 
I'inneo, now Xew York agent, will leave for the 
Orient soon for the purpose of making tin 
initial arrangements for extending the activities 
of the company to the bar East. I'inneo will be 
accompanied by John J. Gorman, chief clerk of 
the Dodwell Company at Seattle, and well 
known at San Francisco. Gorman has resigned 
trom Dodwell. Me is conversant with trade con- 
ditions with the Orient, for he has handled this 
class of business for many years, and is recog- 
nized as an authority by the local shippers. 
Hugh Gallagher, who recently left San Francisco 
to work in the Seattle office, will succeed Pinneo 
as Xew York agent. The recent changes in- 
stalled in the organization of the company in- 
dicate thai Haines and Alexander are expecting 
to cut deeply into the Oriental business. It is 
not known bow much of this shin operation will 
be handled from San Francisco, but it is ex- 
pected that a considerable portion will be 
shifted to the California ports. 

American boys who desire to learn tin- science 
of navigation on a real wind-jammer will soon 
have an opportunity to gratify this desire on the 
Pacific Coast, according to the announcement 
of Henry Fortmann, president of the Alaska 
Packers' Association. Modern seamanship is to 
be taught young Americans on board all ships 
of the Fortmann concern that can be released 
Eor service at the close of the salmon season. 
Fortmann said he bad tendered the free use of 
the vessels to the Government for this purpose, 
and details of the plan are being worked out 
by Government officials, Owing to the heavy 
damage suffered by the tleet in the early sum- 
mer, when many vessels wen- caught in the ice 
jam ott the Alaskan coast, it is not known how 
many of the ships can be u^ed, but three have 
already been designated to make off-shore pass- 
ages from Pacific (Oast ports. The plan is to 
place quite a number of students or apprentices 
on each craft, with instructors, and it is believed 
that after a single voyage the recruits will be 
fitted to ship on other vessels as ordinary sea- 
men. "The company has no desire to make a 
profit," said Fortmann, "and we have made the 
tender without money expectations." 

'I lie expedition sent to the South Seas to 
salve the British ship "County of Roxburg" 
lias been abandoned, according to information 
received from Tahiti: The information was to 
the effect that the steamer sent from San 
Francisco under command of Theodore Wick s. 
deep sea diver, is now at the Tahitian port and 
that the salving equipment is being sold 
there. The abandonment of the venture will re- 
sult in the loss of something like $100,000 to 
San Franciscans, it is reported. The vessel was 
wrecked twelve years ago and was thrown high 
and dry upon the beach of a small island. An 
investigation ina.de about a year ago assured 
Edward A. Christensen and his associates that 
the vessel could be saved by the novel method 
of raising the craft like a house on land, build- 
ing shin ways just as is done before the keel 
is laid at a shipyard, and then launching the 
vessel. It is reported that when the wrecking 
vessel arrived at the scene an investigation 
proved that the entire scheme was not prac- 
ticable and it was decided to mark down the 
money invested to the column of experience and 
tit what salvage was possible by disposing of 
tin gear at Tahiti. The projectors of the scheme 
had previously salved a German steamer sunk 
in the harbor at Tahiti and a large sum of 
money had been gained. It had also been 
intended to salve the German raider "Sccadlcr" 
but it is understood that this venture will also 
be thrown into the discard. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone, Sutter 
5807. (AdvtA 



SI FAS R. AXTELL, attorney for the Eastern 
&' Gulf Sailors' Assn., Marine Cooks & Stewards' 
Association, Marine Firemen, Oilers & Water 
Tenders' Union, has moved his offices to the 
ground floor of the Washington Building, One 
Broadway, New York. Entrance room J, ground 
floor. Consultation and advice on all matters 
relating to enforcement of the Seamen's Act, 
claims for Compensation or damages, will be 
given free of charge as in the past, by Mr. 
Axtell and his expert assistants, Mr. Vernon S 
Jones and Mr. Arthur Lavenburg. (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' 

FEDERATION. 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, III. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS- 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 

EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary 

1%A Lewis Street 

Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md ADO LF KILE, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 
NEW YORK CITY....GUSTAVE H. BROWN, Agent 

51 South Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa... OSCAR CHRISTIANSEN, Agt 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK. Va DAN INGRAHAM , Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT, Va S . ALEXANDERSON, Agent 

123 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala CHARLES RAVING, Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La. .. .CHARLES HANSON, Agent 

400'/ 2 Fulton Street 

PORT ARTHUR. Tex GEO. SCHROEDER, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex JO HN CLAUSEN, Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 
PROVIDENCE, R. I........CHAS. CLAUSEN. Agent 

27 Wickenden Street 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y n South Street 

w r ^r£. T GRIFFIN - President ^^ 

W L CARTLEDGE, Secretary-Treasurer 
v»™. v„ . lel ^P hon e Bowling Green 8840-8841 

New York Branch D . E. GRANGE, Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 
Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass.... j. A . MARTIN, Agent 

6 Lone Wharf 6 

NEW ORLEANS La. .?..... R. T. KAIZER, Agent 
wrm™^ , r 228 Laf ayette Street e 

Norfolk, Va ;•!•#*• QUINN - A e«>t 

»,„„,„„ 54 Commere a P ace 

NEWPORT NEWS WM. j. llGGERS, Agent 

x,.,™, 127 Twenty-third Street B 

BALTIMORE, Md A KILE Sub A^n. 

„_.„„„ 802-804 South Broadway ' A&6nt 

PHILADELPHIA. Pa..O. CHRISTIANSEN, Sub Agt 
*fr,T,TT~ a, 206 Moravian Street S ' 

MOBILE, A *,-■•••■ ■■••■••C. RAVING. Sub. Agent 
*,«„ ,n4 South Commerce Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex... G. SCHROEDER, Sub. Agent 
~ . T „„„^„ 132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex. J. CLAUSEN, Sub. Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, NY 4 Burling Slip 

Telephone John 396 
New York Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y ]6 4 Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN. N. Y no Hamilton Avenue 

Branches: 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa 138 South Second Street 

BALTIMORE. Md 802 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va 127 Twenty-third Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex 132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex . 22 1 20th Street 

BOSTON, Mass i 96 Commercial Street 

NORFOLK, Va 513 East Main Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La 400% Fulton Street 

MOBILE. Ala 104 S. Commerce Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. 1 27 Wickenden Street 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 

Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Agency: 
GLOUCESTER, Mass 163 Main Street 



LAKE DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, 111 324-332 West Randolph Street 

Telephone Franklin 278 
Branches and Agencies: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone Hanover 240. 

A.SHTABULA, 85 Bridge Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 44 Shelby Street 

Telephone Cherry 342. 

CONNEAUT. 922 Day Street 

south CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

TOLEDO, 821 Summit Street 

(Continued on Page 11.) 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



The 


Seamen's 


Journal 


Published weekly at Sa 


n Francisco 




BY THE 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 




Established in 


1887 



PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

S. A. SILVER Business Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE 

One year, by mall - $2.00 | Six months - - - $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. . , , . 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage 

provided for in Section 1103. Act of October 3, 1917, 
authorized September 7, 1918. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
59 Clay Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral Interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer s name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1918. 



'YOUR" PART IX THE DRIVE. 



On another page of this issue will be 
found the second of a series of Fourth Lib- 
erty Loan advertisements inserted, free of 
charge, as a patriotic contribution to the 
great home "drive" which begins on Satur- 
day, September 28. 

Preparatory to our home "drive" no more 
pleasant surprise could have been given the 
appetite of America and her allies, sharpened 
to the taste of victory by the recent tre- 
mendous successes in France, than the news 
that American man power is greatly in ex- 
cess of estimates. 

Where a registration of 12.800,000 men 
had been prepared for under the new 18 to 
45 regulations returns indicated that 14,000,- 
000 men had added themselves potentially to 
the American army. 

All German evasion of the threat of 
America's enormous army in Europe must 
cease in the face of these returns. The Ger- 
man camouflage of utter disregard for Amer- 
ica's "untrained" forces in the field lasted 
but a short time, and deceived few of the 
Kaiser's credulous subjects while it lasted. 

The untamable courage of American sailors 
and soldiers, revealed at a score of places 
at sea and ashore, made it easily understand- 
able why Ludendorff should fall back to the 
Hindenburg line. The enormous reservoir of 
waiting fighters from which Foch can draw 
must give the German General Staff good 
grounds to worry as to whether the retreat 
can be halted at the Rhine. 

Another factor just as depressing to Ger- 
man morale is the threat of America's in- 
exhaustible financial resource-. 

The feat of the United States in raising 
either six or eight billions for war purposes 
in the three weeks between September 28 and 
October 19 will so far surpass anything Ger- 
many has been able to do in war finance as 
to seem to the German mind more a bad 
dream than a stem reality. 

The Fourth Liberty Loan will be raised in 
those three weeks, whether Secretary Mc- 



Adoo's call is for six or eight billion dol- 
lars. The fighting temper of the United 
States guarantees the unqualified success of 
this drive. Civilian Americans will never 
fail to back up its fighting sons abroad. 



FUNDAMENTALS OF FFACE. 



Of more than ordinary significance is the 
reported acceptance of the proposals pre- 
sented by the American delegates to the in- 
terallied Labor and Socialist conference just 
held at London. In brief, the Americans re- 
quested the conference to indorse the fourteen 
points laid down by President Wilson as the 
conditions on which peace may be established 
and maintained. 

The American proposals declare it to be 
"our unqualified determination to do all that 
lies in our power to assist our allied coun- 
tries in marshaling all their resources to tin- 
end that the armed forces of the Central 
Lowers may be driven from the soil of the 
nations which they have invaded and now 
occupy, and that these armed forces shall be 
opposed so long as they carry out orders and 
respond to the control of the militaristic and 
autocratic governments of the Central 
Lowers, which now threaten the existence of 
all self-governing peoples." 

The fundamental principles which must 
underlie the peace treaty were declared by 
the American delegates to be as follows: 

A league of free peoples of the world in a 
common covenant for genuine and practical co- 
operation to secure justice and therefore peace 
in the relations between the nations. 

No political or economic restrictions meant 
to benefit some nations that would cripple or 
embarrass others. 

No indemnities nor reprisals based upon vin- 
dictive purposes or a deliberate desire to injure, 
but to right manifest wrongs. 

The recognition of the rights of small nations 
and the principle that "no people must be 
forced under a sovereignty under which it does 
not wish to live." 

No territorial changes or adjustment of power 
except in the furtherance of the welfare of the 
peoples affected and in the furtherance of world 
peace. 

The American proposals assert that the fol- 
lowing basic principles should also be in- 
corporated in the treaty of peace : 

In law and in practice the principle shall be 
recognized that the labor of a human being is 
in it a commodity or an article of commerce. 

Involuntary servitude shall not exist except as 
punishment for crime for which the party shall 
have been duly convicted. 

The right of free association, free assemblage, 
free speecli and free press shall not be abridged. 

Seamen of the merchant marine shall be guar- 
anteed the right to leave their vessels when they 
are in a safe harbor. 

No article or commodity shall be shipped or 
delivered in international commerce in the pro- 
duction of which children under 16 years of 
age have been employed or permitted to work. 

The basic workday in industry and commerce 
shall not exceed eight hours. 

Trial by jury shall be established. 

Finally, the American proposals favor a 
world labor congress at the same time and 
place as the peace conference, and also direct 
official representation of workers in the of- 
ficial delegations of each of the belligerents 
formulating the peace treaty. 

The seafaring people are, of course, par- 
ticularly concerned in the basic principle re- 
lating to the right to quit their vessels when 
in a safe harbor. Through the Seamen's law 
of 1915, American seamen have already won 
that priceless privilege and the organized 
toilers of the sea in our allied maritime coun- 
tries have from time to time petitioned their 
respective Larliaments for the enactment of 
similar laws. 

Not so, however, with the organized Ger- 
man seamen. And certainly not with their 
officials. A little more than nine years ago. 
i. c in the issue of June 2, 1W, the Journal 



took to task the chief executive of the Ger- 
man Seamen's Union because he was openly 
and brazenly opposing a change in the Sea- 
men's legal status, from virtual slavery to 
freedom. In other words he deemed it im- 
proper to place merchant seamen on an equal 
footing with other citizens, by giving them 
the right to quit when their vessel is in a 
safe harbor. 

In the light of later developments this 
Strange attitude of the German Seamen's 
Union official is truly enlightening. And in 
i in let that there may be no misunderstanding 
upon this amazing state of mind of German 
seamen the battle of words which was waged 
between this paper and the German Seamen's 
official organ "Der Seemann" is published in 
full elsewhere in this issue under the caption 
"The Right To Quit." 

Whether or not the German Seamen's 
Union has had a change of heart upon this 
subject remains to be seen. It surely would 
be an extraordinary state of affairs if a 
representative of the organized German sea- 
men should appeal to the peace conference 
not to force freedom upon them. Yet, judg- 
ing by the events of the past, this is not only 
possible, but highly probable. 

As for the organized seamen in the Allied 
nations it need scarcely be said that they 
will be a unit for the American proposal to 
place merchant seamen upon the same foot- 
ing as other citizens. 

The deluded German seamen need not 
fear that liberty is to be thrust down their 
throats, for — 

Hereditary bondsmen, know ye not 
Who would be free themselves must strike the 
blow? 



THE "LUSITANIA" VERDICT. 



The judgment delivered by Judge Mayer 

of the Federal District Court (Second Dis- 
trict, New York ) in the case of the dam 
age suits brought against the Cunard 
Steamship Co., Limited, by various claim- 
ants on account of the loss of the "Lusi 
tania," as a result of a German submarine 
attack, is a historic document, but too 
lengthy for publication in the JOURNAL. 

The principal points made in the judg- 
ment relieving the shipowners from lia- 
bility in respect of the loss of that \ 
are: 

Where an enemy merchant ship was the 
victim of an attack which was deliberate, 
long-contemplated and intended ruthlessly 
to destroy human life, as well as property, 
it is idle and purely speculative to say that 
the captain of the ship in doing or not 
doing something or in taking one course 
and not another was a contributory cause 
of the disaster. 

The act of a submarine commander in 
attacking an enemy unarmed passenger- 
carrying merchantman without previous 
request to submit to visit is an illegal act. 
and even if negligence were shown on the 
part of the captain of the merchantman. 
such negligence cannot be the proximate 
cause of the loss or damage if an inde- 
pendent illegal act of a third party inter- 
venes to cause the loss. 

Where advertisements appeared in news- 
papers on the same day upon which an 
enemy merchantman set sail from a neu- 
tral port warning travelers of the dangers 
of sailing upon enemy ships, tin- owner 
and master of the merchantman were 
justified in believing that the simple, hu- 
mane and universally accepted principle of 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



providing for the safety of all persons on 
board and their effects before destroying a 
vessel would not be violated, and that the 
warning advertisements were hardly to be 
construed as calling attention to more than 
the perils to be expected from quick dis- 
embarkation and the possible rigors of the 
sea after the proper safeguarding of the 
lives of passengers by at least full oppor- 
tunity to take to the boats. 

In denying recovery from the Cunard 
Steamship Co., upon the foregoing points 
the Judge did not fail to intimate where 
reparation should be sought. 

Said Judge Mayer: 

While in this law suit there may be no re- 
covery, it is not to be doubted that the United 
States of America and her Allies will well re- 
member the rights of those affected by the 
sinking of the "Lusitania," and when the time 
shall come will see to it that reparation shall 
be made for one of the most indefensible acts 
of modern times. 

To meet and answer this contention will, 
indeed, be a most difficult task for the 
Kaiser's delegates to the peace conference. 

Reparation for the thousands of murdered 
merchant seamen has already been demand- 
ed by Great Britain's Premier. And the 
"Lusitania" verdict, summarized herein, in- 
dicates that America, too, will insist upon 
adequate reparation for every submarine 
victim, for every man, woman and child 
murdered through ruthless and piratical 
warfare upon the seas. 



"THE RIGHT TO QUIT." 



THE "CHEAP LABOR" POLICY. 



The following press item appeared in San 

Francisco dailies during the past week: 

Twenty-eight Chinese, comprising the crew of 
a steamer of the East-Asiatic Company, indulged 
in a passive mutiny when the vessel arrived at 
a Pacific port. The Orientals affirm that they 
had shipped with the understanding that they 
would remain on the Pacific, and when they 
learned that the United States Shipping Board 
intended to send the vessel with its cargo of 
sugar to Atlantic waters they refused to do duty. 
The only thing to do, according to Otto Jel- 
strup, the East-Asiatic agent here, is to send 
the Chinese home as soon as possible and fill 
the vacancies with other sailors. The Shipping 
Board will be asked to furnish the necessary 
men. 

Comment upon this "mutiny" is scarcely 
necessary. 

If the champions of Oriental labor had had 
their way in years past, white seamen would 
be practically extinct to-day. Only the per- 
sistent battle waged by the organized seamen 
has saved the day for America, and it is 
still possible to man our ships by experienced 
and courageous white seamen. 

Surely, it is fortunate that America did 
not listen to the plea for "cheap labor" and 
adopt the manning policy so fervently urged 
by Mr. Robert Dollar. 



Some observers think that the most 
characteristic thing about the American 
sailors and soldiers, something which 
astounds the enemy and excites the ad- 
miration of our allies, is the capacity of 
the American fighters to do individual 
thinking and fighting. The German fights 
successfully only in mass formation, in or- 
ganized bodies, while every American sol- 
dier has an initiative and independence of 
action which gives him remarkable effi- 
ciency in open fighting. They are not 
senseless cogs, but each is an individual 
working unit in a great fighting machine. 
Every American at home should feel an 
individual responsibility and do liis or her 
individual part in winning the war. There 
is not an American citizen who can not 
help win the war. The Fourth Liberty 
Loan drive begins Sept. 28. Enough said! 



How the German Seamen's Unions' Chief Execu- 
tive Brazenly Lined Up With the Enemies 
of Human Freedom. 



For reasons indicated in this issue's editorial, 
entitled "Fundamentals of Peace," the following 
is reprinted from the Journal of Tune 2, 1909: 
SEAMEN SEEKING LIBERTY. 
"It has taken many years in the experience of 
the European seamen's unions to bring about a 
realization that the first and main condition of 
successful industrial organization of seamen is 
the establishment by law of the seaman's right 
to quit his vessel when in a safe harbor. Slowly 
but surely, however, the leading men in the 
European seamen's unions, with but one notable 
exception, have come to understand that all 
other grievances about which the organized or 
unorganized seafarers may justly complain are 
but minor evils when compared with the curse 
of involuntary servitude under which the sea- 
faring people of several of the most enlightened 
nations are still compelled to labor. 

"According to a report by the International 
Transportworkers' Federation, President Lindley 
of the Swedish Seamen's Union, who is also a 
representative in the Swedish Parliament, has 
submitted in Parliament three propositions per- 
taining to seamen. A large number of repre- 
sentatives arc said to have pledged their sup- 
port to Mr. Lindley's propositions, which read 
as follows: 

"'1. That seamen shall be placed on equal 
footing with other citizens of the nation and in 
consequence shall not be arrested and punished 
for leaving their employment when their vessel 
is in safety in a home port. 

" '2. That the seamen lie given some par- 
ticipation in the management of the Seamen's 
Offices (Shipping Commissioners' Offices) and 
that explicit instruction he .given to all Consuls 
and Managers of Seamen's Offices to note care- 
fully any and all encroachments upon the legal 
rights of seamen. 

" '3. That seamen be given the privilege to 
begin their compulsory military service at any 
time, instead of having to wait for a specified 
day.' 

"The official organ of the German seamen's 
unions, 'Der Seemann,' edited by Mr. Muller, 
expresses doubt as to the advisability and pro- 
priety of seamen asking the law-making bodies 
in unshackle the chains which tic them to their 
ships. Mr. Muller, who thus evidences his 
inability to understand that freemen have cer- 
tain advantages over slaves, criticizes Mr. Lind- 
ley's proposition No. 1 in the following lan- 
guage: 

"'While we fully sympathize with Mr. Lind- 
ley's propositions 2 and 3, we can not refrain 
from expressing doubts concerning measure No. 
1 for tactical reasons as well as upon principle. 
We contend that it can never be in the interest 
of seamen to ask for something impossible in 
a Parliament which in its majority opposes 
progress and favors reaction. Particularly, when 
from the seamen's point of view the very 
greatest doubts must be entertained against such 
demands.' 

"Unfortunately, Mr. Muller does not enter 
into details regarding the 'seamen's point of 
view,' and we can not possibly surmise his own 
point of view. Perhaps, the editor of the of- 
ficial organ of the German Seamen's Union has 
a faint sense of humor, and we strongly suspect 
that his conscience tells him that his distorted 
'seamen's point of view' is just a little out of 
place in the columns of a paper owned and 
controlled by seamen. Really, it is enough to 
make angels weep, to think that in this year of 
our Lord 1909, a representative of seamen 
organized to better their conditions should op- 
pose the proposal to put seafarers on equal 
terms with workers ashore, by granting them 
the privilege to quit their work when in a safe 
harbor. To our knowledge there is just one 
reason why Mr. Muller is opposed to granting 
more freedom to the seamen. Mr. Muller is a 
class-conscious Socialist first, and only inci- 
dentally a trade-unionist. Every action of Trade- 
Unionist Muller is inspired and modeled in the 
fertile brain of Socialist Muller. For instance, 
Trade-Unionist Muller may be tempted to ask 
the German Reichstag to give more liberty to 
the merchant seamen of the nation, he could 
appeal to every patriotic German statesman to 
do justice to the merchant seamen, for the na- 
tion denends upon them to man her growing 
navy. But Socialist Muller scouts the idea of 
permitting any others than Socialists to receive 
credit for granting more liberty to seamen. 
Socialist Muller is content to have the seamen 
wear their shackles until the Parliaments of 
the world are dominated by Socialists. These, 
we believe, are the sole reasons fur the extra- 
ordinary position which Mr. Muller lias taken 
in criticizing the Swedish seamen for asking 
for as much liberty as is enjoyed by the 
humblest toiler ashore. 

"Great credit is due Mr. Lindley, who, al- 
though himself a Socialist, is nevertheless a 
broad minded trade unionist with tli- .miii,,..;, 

"I' his convictions Lei us hope that succe 
will crown the efforts of our fellow -unionists 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 23, 1918. 
Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., Ed. Andersen presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping good. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, 

Secretary pro tern. 
Maritime Hall Bldg., 59 Clay Street. Tel. 
Kearny 2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. 16, 1918. 
No meeting. Shipping slow; men scarce. 

J. ETCH ELLS, Agent. 
Room 11, de Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 



St. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 16, 1918. 
Shipping fair. 

WM. HARDY, Agent. 
58 Powell Street E. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. 
Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 16, 1918. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects fair. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 16, 1918. 
Shipping good. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 

84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 16, 1918. 
Shipping fair; members scarce. 

ED. ROSENBERG, Agent. 
T. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 16, 1918. 
Shipping good. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
88^ Third Street. Tel. Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 16, 1918. 
Shipping good; members scarce. 

HARRY OHLSON. Agent. 
128^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 10, 1918. 
No meeting. Shipping dull. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal.,' Sept. 19, 1918. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping good. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 
42 Market Street. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 12, 1918. 
No meeting. Shipping good. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203. Phone Main 
2233. P. O. Box 214. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 11, 1918. 
No meeting. Shipping slow; no members idle. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
Sepulveda Bldg., 128^ Sixth Street. Phone, 
Home 115; Sunset 66 W. 



DIED. 

Albert Wohlschon, No. 179, a native of Ger- 
many, age 61. Died at San Francisco, Cal., 
Sept. 9, 1918. 



Shipping terminals, piers and warehouses cov- 
ering an area of $1,250,000 square feet may be 
built at Everett, Wash., if plans forwarded to 
the Quartermaster's Division at San Francisco 
by the Everett Port Commission prove accept- 
able. At the invitation of Colonel De Vol, U. 
S. A., these plans have been drawn by Taggart 
Aston, Port Engineer at Everett. 



Consolidation of the purchasing department 
of steel ship division, the production depart- 
ment and the transportation department is being 
affected this week in the Portland, Ore., offices 
of the Emergency Fleet Corporation. Heads of 
these departments are in Portland from district 
headquarters in Seattle arranging details of the 

K.i lines. 



i 1m New West nun -t , i i on truction & Engi- 
neering ( o, New Westminster, B. ('., has 
secured contracts for ten wooden ships for 
French interests Five will be 1,500 tons and 
the remainder 3,000 tons. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



OUR WASHINGTON LETTER. 
i By Laurence Todd. I 



President Johnston of the [nternational 

Association of Machinists gives this ex- 
planation of the strike of the 6000 members 
of his organization in Bridgeport, which 
has been ended by the announcement by 
President Wilson that they must return to 
work under the terms of the Eidlitz award 
or be outlawed from all war industries for 
a year. 

Bridgeport is the home of between 65 
and 75 plants that are doing war work. 
The onlj considerable body of union men 
in the town are the Machinists. These 
union men are skilled. They want to deal 
with the shop bosses through their own 
committee- of -killed men who understand 
their need-. They do not want to give 
their interests into the care of committees 
of unorganized and unskilled workers. 

The award against which they went on 
strike was made by < >tto M. Eidlitz, a New 
York architect, whose name was accepted 
by the labor members of the National War 
Labor Board as one of the umpires, at the 
recommendation of the Carpenters' spokes- 
man in the Board. When the War Labor 
Board failed to agree on the Bridgeport 
case, they drew lot- to choose one of the 
ten men on their list of umpires, and 
Eidlitz wa- drawn. When he made his 
award, which both -ides were bound in ad- 
vance to accept, he applied to the entire 
Bridgeport district the same plan of shop 
committees and central board of appeals 
that had been applied to the plant of the 
General Electric Co. at Pittsfield, Mass. He 
also fixed wage increase- on a sliding scale, 
without reference to the ordinary classifica- 
tions of skilled mechanics. 

This award, the Bridgeport member- of 
the .Machinists' Union believed, would put 
the control of the labor situation in the 
hands ci the bosses, since the shops where 
there were only a handful of union men 
would probably be so "handled" in the 

election of shop committees that the favor- 
ites of the management would lie chosen 
as representatives of the workers. The 
same thing, the) declared, would happen 
in the case of the central board of appeals: 
non-union men, popular for reasons quite 
foreign to industrial issues, would win the 
elections. Then the fruits of years of trade 
union organization and sacrifices would be 
lo-t. through the failure of the workers' 
committees to fight for the highest possible 
standard of living for the workers. 

It was this fear that the bosses would 
capture the elections inside the majority of 
the plants that brought on the strike. The 
union men saw no hope ol an early read- 
justment of wages, which War Labor 
board officials believed would be secured 
through the new system of elected com 
mittecs. The international officers of the 
Machinists shared the anxiety of their 
member- in Bridgeport, but they urged the 
men to stay at work, and to wait and see 
whether their fears of a reactionary set oi 
committtees were justified. The men re- 
fused to wait and see. They declared that 
Eidlitz had been unfriendly to union labor. 
and had violated the spirit of the President's 
proclamation of April 8. They pointed to 
the fact that Eidlitz had lobbied at Albany 
a^ain-t a workingmen's compensation law. 
They decided that no good could come oul 
of his award. So they went out. 



President Wilson did not issue his ulti- 
matum until the general executive board of 
the Machinists had given the Bridgeport 
strikers 48 hours in which to go back to 
work or stand suspended. They did not go 
back within the 48 hours, but the President's 
letter was published within that time, and the 
Strikers had agreed that they would go back 
if the President asked them to do 

John-ton and the other international of- 
ficer- agree with their members at Bridge- 
port on the probability that shop committees 
of unorganized and unskilled men will not 
make so good a showing against the bosses, 
in debate, a- would committees of union 
veterans. They believe that the Bridgeport 
award will have to he revised, upon appeal, 
-o that committee- of each class of labor 
will deal with the management. In the mean- 
time they will make the union influence go 
as far as it can among the 90 per cen 
Bridgeport worker- who made no protesl 
against the Eidlitz award. 

< hi Monday. September 23, Joint Chair- 
men Taft and Walsh, with Messrs. < dander 
and Michaels, of the National War Labor 
board, commenced hearings on the Minne- 
apolis Steel & Machinery Co. dispute, in 
Minneapolis. Only in very exceptional 
has the board sent it- two chairmen along 
with a labor member and an employer mem- 
ber, to investigate a complaint and make an 
award. This Minneapolis dispute is impor- 
tant because it involves the action of the 
State Public Safety Commission in issuing 
an order, based on a pretended agreement 
between organized employers and certain 
labor officials, that no more shops should be 
unionized during the war. That order directly 
violates President Wilson's proclamation of 
principles upon which the War Labor Board 
was established. 

Judge McGee, chairman of the Minnesota 
Public Safety Commission, ha- tried to en- 
force the open shop rule against the employes 
in the plant of the Steel and .Machinery Co. 
The strike now in progress, and the political 
struggle of the organized labor and organized 
farmer forces in Minnesota to capture the 
governorship and rid the State of McGee 
ami his terrorist method-, are SO closely in- 
terlocked that the War Labor board will 
have difficulty in knowing, at any given mo- 
ment, whether it is investigating an industrial 
plant or the government of Minnesota. 

Something new is happening in the labor 

world of the United State-. The National 
Federation of Federal Employes is not 
merely publishing a pro-ram for the period 
of reconstruction after the war, but it i- set- 
ting about the hard job of carrying that 
program through. It- recent convention at 
Chicago, with delegates present from a hun- 
dred local union- adopted resolutions de 
daring : 

1. That the Government should guarantee 
to the returning soldiefs and sailors, and to 
ad civilians, the opportunity to earn a living. 

_'. That women engaged in industry at the 
close of the war should not be forced out to 
make room for men. nor be made to under- 
hid men in order to retain their jobs. 

3, That the aged workers and children 
should he taken out of industry for their own 
1 and for the good of the community. 

I That except through the usual efficiency 
tests, the returned soldiers and jailors should 
not he given civil service jobs merely as a 



means of discharging the debt of the public 
to these men. 

Committees were appointed to consider and 
report means for making these demands ef- 
fective. The convention voted that some of 
the measures needed wire: 

< >ld-age, health, and unemployment insur- 
ance, hacked by minimum wage legislation. 

A national program of construction of pub- 
lic works. 

Preparation of farms for the returned Sol- 
diers and sailor- and war industries workers. 

Control of prices on the necessaries of life 
in the interest of worker and consumer. 

Heavier taxation of big incomes and big 
fortunes, with taxation of land held idle for 
speculative purposes. 

Luther C. Steward, president of the organi- 
zation, i- the promoter of this program, 
which closely resemble- the demands of the 
British and Australian workers. In the Fed- 
eral Employes' unions are some 27.0(10 Gov- 
ernment employes, most of them having high 
school or college training, and having a 
standard of living that make- them di-sati-- 
lied with the present situation of the Govern- 
ment clerk. They are likely to become a big 
factor in the agitation for a greater -hare of 
power for organized labor in the Govern- 
ment, and they will agitate particularly 
through politics. Their magazine, The 
ral Employe, prints in its Septem- 
ber number an account of the defeat 
of Congressman Borland, who tried to 
force Government employes to work an extra 
six hour- each week. They fought him in 
the primary in Kansas City, and he was 
beaten more than two to one in the city prc- 
cinctS, and by 6728 in the whole district. 

In that connection it should be noted that 
Representative Edward Keating of Colorado, 
who has had the enthusiastic support of these 
( iovernment employes and the postal workers. 
along with the rest of the labor movement, 
has been renominated in Colorado by some 
2000 majority, which insure- his re-election 
in November. 

Once more the Lake Carriers' Association, 

dominated by the Steel Trust, has apparently 
tricked the seamen and firemen on the Lake-. 
The Carriers' officers have been summoned 
here by the Shipping Foard, to sign the gen- 
eral agreement of the ship owners of the 
country with the organized seamen and the 
Shipping Board, and once more they have 
raised technical points which delay the en- 
forcement of the conditions. The Sailor-' 
Union and the Firemen's Union of the Great 
Fakes are watching the Carriers closely, and 
are steadily pressing the Shipping Board for 

a fair enforcement of the conditions. They 

are no more satisfied with "scraps of paper" 
in industrial disputes than was President Wil- 
son in the Bridgeport affair. 

* 

Five year- after the passage of the women's 
eight-hour law in the District of Columbia, 
Congress has permitted the women's minimum 
law io go through. This law creates a 
hoard which shall -et minimum rates of wages 
in private employment for women and tor 
minors. The rates must be sufficient to sup- 
port tin worker and her dependents in health 
and reasonable comfort. This Keating-Tram- 
mel] hill is about to he signed by the Presi- 
dent, who endorses ii- provisions. 

On the day of its passage through the 
Senate the expected opposition to it, from 
Senators King of Utah and Pomerene of 
( >hio. wa- blocked by Mr-. Newton D. Faker. 



«. * 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



wife of the Secretary of War. The Secre- 
tary, before lie entered the cabinet, was 
president of the National Consumers' League, 
which drafted and promoted the bill. Mrs. 
Baker is a director of the League in the 
District of Columbia. She was probably the 
one person who could have prevented these 
two Democratic Senators from killing the 
measure. As it was, Reed of Missouri fili- 
bustered desperately against it, denouncing 
it as "bolshevik legislation," while Smoot, 
Lodge, Penrose, King, Pomerene and others 
evaded the rollcall. Thomas of Colorado 
voted aeainst the bill. 



WAS NOAH A PIKER! 



It's all wrong about Noah being 600 years 
old before he knew how to build a ship, ac- 
cording to the editor of "Steel Topsides," 
publication of the Supple-l'>allin Shipbuild- 
ing Corporation. Portland, Ore. As a mat- 
ter of fact, th ; s scribe has found that Xoah 
was only 480 years old; so he has figured 
out that the patriarchal shipbuilder was 25 
per cent, efficient. While this record shows 
up Noah as a piker in the shipbuilding 
game, compared to some of the modern 
contracts, it doesn't appear so bad for a 
green hand. 

According to Biblical authority, found in 
the Book of Genesis, Chapter 6. which the 
"Steel Topsides" editor seems to have con- 
sulted, Xoah was 600 years old at the time 
of the flood, but, according to commenta- 
tors, such as Rev. Samuel McCauley Jack- 
son, LL. D., and other noted historians, who 
have delved into the ancient history of the 
Bible, Noah received his revelation as to the 
deluge and how to proceed ; that is, the 
plans, specifications and necessary blue-prints 
of how to build the ark and the manifest 
of his cargo, 120 years prior to the rising 
of the waters. This shows clearly that at 
the age of 480 he had the advanced informa- 
tion of how to build an ark. 

It is found from data gleaned from the 
specifications issued that the vessel was 300 
cubits long, 50 cubits broad and 30 cubits 
high, was a three-decker, as she was spoken 
of as having a lower, second and third 
story. 

The plans of obtaining light were as 
follows : 

"A window shalt thou make and in a cubit 
-halt thou finish it above." Also "and the 
door of the ark thou shalt set in the side." 

The specifications called for "gopher" 
wood, a species of cypress, pine or cedar 
and the "pitch" with which it was coated 
was asphalt. 

Taking the ancient measure of a cubit at 
about one and one-half feet, the vessel was 
450 feet in length. 7? feet beam and 45 
feet in height. 

Snellius, of much fame in ancient times, 
computes the ark to have been above half 
an acre in area, and Dr. Arbuthnot, another 
historian, in 16*7, computes it to have been 
of 81.062 tons. 

As to Noah's ability in the shipbuilding 
game, or as to his qualifications as a master 
mariner, history is silent. 

Noah was the son of I.amech. Me was 
the tenth and last of the lineage of Scth, 
and he numbered among his crew in build- 
ing and operating his vessel, three sons. 
namely: Ham, Shem and Japheth, and there 
is no indication in the Biblical account that 
either of them knew anything about caulking 
or ship carpentry. 

The fact of the matter is. Noah waited 



480 years for his instructions and plans 
from which to build the ark, and after be- 
got these plans, finished the job in 120 
years. 

If Noah's Shipping Board had shot him 
the plans soon enough, it would, therefore, 
seem that he could have built four arks in- 
stead of one in his lifetime. 

IPs biography probably reads like this: 

Waiting for plans 480 years. 

Building the ark 120 years. 

Efficiency 25 per cent. 



HERRING RESOURCES. 



The Commissioner of Fisheries authorizes 
the following: 

A recent report from the American con- 
sul at Stavanger, Norway, on the spring 
herring fishery of Norway shows that in the 
past four seasons, including 1918, the catch 
had an average animal value of about $6,- 
700,000. About 80 per cent, of the yield 
was salted and most of the remainder was 
sold locally or exported as fresh fish, a very 
small quantity being canned or kippered. 

The importance and value of this fishery 
is an indication of what may be done by 
adequate Government encouragement and as- 
sistance and by private enterprise and ad- 
dress in the United States, particular!)' in 
Alaska. The herring resources of Alaska 
arc probably not inferior to those of Nor- 
way and, considering the greater extent of 
the coast line, are possibly much larger, yet 
the average annual value of the catch in 
that territory for the four years ending De- 
cember 31. 1917, was but $252,000. 

Owing to the action of the Bureau of 
Fisheries in placing experts in Alaska to 
give assistance to fishermen in improving 
their methods of curing herring, and in call- 
ing the attention of distributors to the avail- 
ability of the supply, the value of the output 
in I'M 7 rose to $587,777, nearly double that 
of the preceding year and about eight times 
that of 1914. 

The promising feature of this comparison 
is not the value of the pack of l'H7, which 
was but 8 per cent, of that of Norway in 
the same year, but the rapid increase in the 
past four years. 

The imports of cured herring into the 
United States in normal times are heavy. 
By reason of war conditions these imports 
are now greatly curtailed and from some 
sources are entirely cut off, and there is 
presented an opportunity for Alaska to per- 
manently acquire a large part of this trade. 
Each careless or dishonest packer will be a 
menace to the industrial progress of the Ter- 
ritory. The herring packed under the Bu- 
reau's instruction and supervision last year 
was the best received in New York, and the 
standard so established should be scrupu- 
lous! v maintained. 



THE PEOPLE AND WAR TAXES. 



More than $3,500,000,000 has been col- 
lected in internal revenue taxes, including 
income and excess-profits taxes, for the fiscal 
year. This exceeds by over $100,000,000 the 
estimates made a few months ago, and by 
oyer $200,000,000 the estimates made a year 
ago when the revenue measures were passed 
by Congress. 

The success in collecting this large revenue 
is attributed by the Treasury Department to 
the patriotism and co-operation of the Amer- 
ican people in promptly and cheerfully meel 
ing the war burdens imposed upon them. 



FOOD FISH FROM THE GULF. 



Two hundred thousand pounds of fine 
fish have been supplied to housewives in 
Nashville, Louisville, and Indianapolis 
through the cooperation of the United 
States Department of Agriculture, the 
L nited States Bureau of Fisheries, and the 
United States Food Administration. Reg- 
ular weekly shipments of carload lots are 
being made to these three inland cities 
from points on the Gulf of Mexico in order 
to encourage the use of less meat by an 
increased consumption of fish. An agent 
of the Department of Agriculture is work- 
ing with the Railroad Administration in 
handling the transportation, and the dis- 
tribution is under the direction of State 
and city food administrators in coopera- 
tion with the Bureau of Fisheries. 

Ten carload lots aggregating more than 
200,000 pounds have already been distrib- 
uted in this way. Each dealer notifies the 
local food administrator how many pounds 
he will need for his trade and he is sup- 
plied with his share immediately upon the 
arrival of a car. Circulars are distributed 
calling the housewives' attention to the 
fish, and telling how best to cook them. 
Sea mullet, sea catfish, sheepshead, trout, 
and hardtail are some of the varieties that 
have found favor with the women. Plans 
are now being completed to ship fish from 
the North Carolina coast to Pittsburgh. 

Labors Economic Platform 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor dis- 
putes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight 
hours per day on all Federal, State or municipal 
work, and not less than the prevailing per diem 
wage rate of the class of employment in the 
vicinity where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man-suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or 
compartments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by the 

1 banking interests for their own private gain. 



I^f* 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 

(Continued from Page 3.) 



accomplish. Team work between county 
agricultural agents and Government agen- 
cies is considered largely responsible for 
the excellent results. 

Starting from ( Iklahoma, early in June, 
the Government and local officers mar- 
shaled their army of labor, which swept 
north as the grain ripened. All along the 
line every effort was made to guard the 
interests of the farmers and workers, to 
prevent surpluses of men in one locality 
while a shortage existed elsewhere, and 
io keep the whole campaign free of mud- 
dle, confusion and wasted effort. 

Throughout the harvest care was taken 
to handle the cutting without making the 
Nation-wide appeal customary in other 
years. It is stated that this resulted in a 
better class of workers than heretofore. 

The employment service says that the 
assistance to the Nation because the wheat 
was harvested without calling on industrial 
sections for aid is incalculable. 



National Conference on State Labor Laws. 

The War Labor Policies Hoard has called 
a conference on the enforcement of indus- 
trial standards for September 30 and Oc- 
tober 1 at Washington. The Governor of 
each State is asked to send a representa- 
tive. 

The invitation says, in part: 

"The War Labor Policies Board, ap- 
pointed to unify the labor policies of the 
Federal Government, has prepared various 
contract clauses which affect industrial re- 
lations. All future contracts given out by 
Government departments will include these 
clauses. They make certain requirements; 
such as the restriction of child labor and 
convict labor and the observance of all 
State factory laws. 

"It is planned to designate the proper 
officials in each State to consult with and 
assist the Federal authorities who are re- 
sponsible for enforcing these regulations 
and who will, to some extent, maintain in- 
spection services of their own. 

"For this purpose the War Labor Poli- 
cies Board requests your co-operation in 
carrying out this policy, and hopes that 
you will direct the designated officials to 
assist tin- Federal authorities. 

"The Federal Government, in its activi- 
ties concerned with industrial relations, is 
brought into increasing contact with State 
agencies. A more intimate understanding 
of their common purposes in the enforce- 
ment of industrial standards is therefore 
essential." 

U. S. Educates Children. 
The Ordnance Department of the War 
Department has developed an educational 
system for children of war munitions work- 
ers who are employed in localities that 
were bare fields a few months ago. Several 
of the larger municipalities have been asked 
to loan some of their best teachers who 
would volunteer for this service during the 
war. Secretary of War Baker has selected 
William G. Coburn. superintendent of 
schools at Battle Creek. Mich,, as director 
of this movement. School buildings have 
been designed on the unit plan to admit 
of easy expansion, and each school will 
have an auditorium, gymnasium and other 
facilities to develop the community spirit 
of the adult population. Provision has 
been made for instruction in domestic arts, 



first-aid treatment and physical training 
for the women of the communities. As the 
work of plant construction gives way to 
plant operation, and the population becomes 
stable, it is planned to give employees a 
voice in the management of the towns. 



"Labor Turnover" Loss of Efficiency. 

In a speech in New York, Secretary of 
Labor Wilson referred to labor turnover 
as the "individualistic strike" which brings 
a greater loss by the country than all the 
collective strikes and lockouts combined. 

"Prior to the war," said Secretary Wil- 
son, "it was nothing unusual to find estab- 
lishments having a 200 or 300 per cent, 
turnover annually, to find establishments 
where the movement of men from one job 
to another was so great that it required 
the employment of 200 to 300 workmen 
to maintain an organization of 100. 

"Since the war there have been num- 
bers of instances where the turnover has 
gone above 1,000 per cent., and in one par- 
ticular instance it went to 100 per cent. 
a week for a period of some six or eight 
weeks. 

"The turnover of labor means a loss of 
efficiency. In addition to the loss that 
takes place in the time between the leav- 
ing of the one and the coming of the other 
no man can reach his highest efficiency in 
any industry or on any machine until he 
has become familiar with his machine, fa- 
miliar with his shop, with the foreman, 
with his shop surroundings generally, and 
so there is always a loss of efficiency by 
virtue of a turnover of labor. 

"The turnover of labor is in reality the 
individualistic strike. It is the strike of 
individual, either a union or nonunion man, 
dissatisfied with conditions, and either un- 
able or unwilling to secure the coopera- 
tion of his associates in a collective pro- 
test. 

"My observation is that that individual- 
istic strike — the turnover of labor — brings 
us greater loss than all of the collective 
strikes and lockouts that occur in the coun- 
try, and anything we can do to reduce 
that turnover of labor will assist in main- 
taining efficiency. It is with the hope of 
being able to reduce that turnover to some 
extent that we are seeking to build up an 
organization by which all labor will be 
handled through one agency." 



"THE RIGHT TO QUIT." 

(Continued from Page 7.) 



in Sweden to the end that they may soon 
obtain and enjoy that most priceless heritage of 
all, absolute personal liberty!" 

When the foregoing was received in Ger- 
many the official paper of the German Seamen's 
Union, "Der Seemann," published a bitter reply 
in the nature of a personal attack upon Andrew 
Furuseth and the present editor of the Journal. 

This typical German reply was translated at 
the time but has never before been published. 
It follows in full for the edification and enlight- 
enment of all who have been unable to fathom 
the German workers' curious notions upon 
"Liberty": 

THE GERMAN SNEERS AT FREEDOM. 

"A fellow worker by the name of Paul Schar- 
renberg. of San Francisco, in the issue of the 
Seamen's Journal of June 2 (1909), feels called 
upon to launch a real seamanlike philippic 
against our colleague, Paul Muller. Tn his en- 
lightened moral sally against the 'forgetfulness 
of duty' and 'reactionary attitude' of our col- 
league, Paul Muller, and the German seamen's 
workingmen's movement, this harlequin and 
'would-be' arises as a preacher of 'freedom' and 
to make it clear to us what it means to lead the 
seamen in their fight for liberty. We are over- 
whelmed at so much 'energy,' "<1i- si r«.- for free- 
'better judgment,' 'broader views' and 
'clear-sight' of our 'American' friend, 'the cham- 
pion of liberty,' 'social-political pace-maker' and 
'trades-union tactician.' We give here his out- 
pouring verbatim. His article appears under the 



title (pregnant with meaning), 'Seamen Seeking 
Liberty,' fresh, amusing and thoroughly Amer- 
ican, as follows:'' 

(Here follows translation of the article from 
the Journal of June 2, 1909.) 

The German paper then continues: 

"It is really difficult to make the required 
answer to the mad ravings of Mr. Paul Schar- 
renberg and at the same time consider only the 
case itself. We therefore consider it better to 
abandon Mr. Paul Scharrenberg, together with 
his rant, to the fate they so well deserve. Every 
man has the right to make a fool of himself the 
best way he knows. The International Transport 
Workers' Congress in Vienna, our colleague Paul 
Muller and the delegates from all other coun- 
tries, accorded this right to Mr. P. Scharrenberg's 
soul brother, Mr. Furuseth, then why should not 
we at this time and place grant this the 'only 
earnest and sincere champion of liberty' the 
same privilege? This same madness that the 
Scandinavian Yankee and globe trotter, Andrew 
Furuseth, championed by word of mouth in the 
late congress and later in newspaper articles 
and letters, Mr. Paul Scharrenberg parrot-wise 
throws at us in the organ of our American sis- 
ter organization. Only he makes his impeach- 
ment against our attitude upon this very im- 
portant and weighty question somewhat more 
unfortunate and ridiculous than his intimate 
Furuseth, who soon got over his malady in 
Vienna, when his ideas of 'liberty' and 'struggle 
for freedom' were turned into laughter and 
ridicule. 

"It hurts us to think that the otherwise es- 
teemed leader of our Swedish sister organiza- 
tion, Mr. Lindley, has so far lost himself in the 
'liberty maze' of the 'practical American,' Furu- 
seth, that he, more out of courtesy than from 
sincere conviction, undertook to lay Furuseth's 
cuckoo egg in the collection of printed matters 
of the Swedish parliament. That the 'burgoisie- 
patriots' and 'statesmen and parliamentarians' of 
the Swedish parliament, whom these American 
'Democrats,' Furuseth-Scharrcnberg, are so much 
in love with, showed no desire to hatch the 
Furuseth-Lindlcy cuckoo eggs, experience has 
shown us, and we doubt very much whether 
friend Lindley has any desire to make a further 
attempt to juggle in the Swedish parliament 
with the Furuseth cuckoo eggs. But we are also 
convinced that the Furuseth-Scharrenberg 'hirn- 
verbranten' (emanating from a burnt-out brain) 
demands will be set on the beach by the Amer- 
ican parliament in the same manner as hap- 
pened to friend Lindley in the Swedish parlia- 
ment through his own foolishness. 

"The an ti- Socialist s Furuseth-Scharrenberg 
have as yet produced no proof that the bur- 
goisie-patriotic lawmakers in America are at all 
enthusiastic over their anarchistic 'rights' and 
'freedom' quack propositions, and are willing to 
make them any concessions. It makes us tired 
to have to discuss with these 'practical poli- 
ticians' the basic principles of freedom, and the 
trades-union and political tactics of our col- 
league, Paul Muller, as well as the whole sea- 
men's workingmen's movement of Germany. We 
will only remark: Whoever knows the history of 
our struggle for the rights and freedom of the 
seamen, on the outside as well as in parliament 
— and our colleague, Paul Muller, has for 13 
years been the leader of this struggle — must re- 
gard the 'hirnverbranten' (emanating from a 
burnt-out brain") attack of the American Paul 
Scharrenberg, whose pen can only have been 
inspired by that half-idiot A. Furuseth, as un- 
called for as nonsensical. We take our mission 
and our mandate too seriously that we out of 
a sense of our industrial impotence on the out- 
side should support any demands for so-called 
'freedom and rights,' that after all are two-sided 
and consequently could be used against the sea- 
men, and besides make us ridiculous. We sub- 
mit our position with clear conscience to the 
critical judgment of the public. We are engaged 
in practical politics. The politics of the Utopian 
and 'Wolkenschieber' (those who shove the 
clouds) we leave to the befogged 'practical 
Americans' Furuseth-Scharrenberg. Even when 
they find themselves in company with that 
Epigon the 'great' J. H. Wilson, of London." 

STEEL SHIPS WITHOUT RIVETS. 



The first steel vessel built without rivets, 
so far as known, has just been launched 
on the south coast of England. The pro- 
duction of this vessel, it is considered, may 
mark an epoch in shipbuilding, the plates 
being fused together by electric welding in 
one process. General adoption of this proc- 
ess, it is held, would speed up production, 
with an estimated saving of from twenty 
to twenty-five per cent, in both time and 
material. The United States Shipping Board, 
it is understood, has been in close touch with 
the experiment, with the result that arrange- 
ments are said to he in hand for the build- 
ing of a number of 10.000 ton standard 
ships after this plan, in the production of 
which the riveters will become welders. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



A SEA GOING CANAL BOAT. 



One may shortly travel by water from 
Duluth to New Orleans without changing 
boats. This has already been possible for 
years by boats short enough to use the locks 
of the Welland Canal; but the new barge 
canal built by the State of New York from 
Lake Erie to the Hudson will enable it to be 
accomplished without the long detour down 
the St. Lawrence. A vessel adapted both to 
the canal and the ocean part of this trip has 
just been designed and built by Captain 
McDougal, of Duluth, the originator of the 
"whaleback." The economic advantages of 
ability to ship a cargo directly from Lake to 
Atlantic ports, or across the ocean to Europe, 
need no elaboration. The locks of the new 
canal are 320 by 45 feet, and the newly de- 
signed freighter must, of course, be slightly 
smaller than this. As a matter of fact, the 
"R. L. Barnes," as she is called, is 25Sy 2 by 
43 feet, and measures 24 feet from keel to 
top deck. Says a contributor to "The Scien- 
tific American": 

"In the design of the vessel it was sought 
to secure three principal results: First, a 
ship of maximum cargo-carrying capacity on 
moderate dimensions ; secondly, a vessel 
which could utilize standard steel shapes in 
its construction, and that would require a 
minimum amount of shop-work at the ship- 
yard ; and thirdly, so to construct the upper 
works, smokestacks, masts, etc., that these 
could quickly be removed and placed in the 
hold, and the vessel, as thus stripped, be 
capable of clearing the bridges and overhead 
structures of the State Barge Canal. 

"The most striking and novel feature about 
the 'R. L. Barnes' is the strictly rectangular 
cross-section of the ship and the absence of 
any fairing away of the lines toward the bow 
and stern, which are strictly wedge-shaped. 
The flat floor extends from stem to stern, 
and the cross-sections of the vessel, even at 
a few feet from the stem, show an absolutely 
rectangular form, with parallel sides. 

"The builder claims that this type of con- 
struction is not only very cheap and con- 
ducive to rapid erection, but that it gives a 
maximum amount of cargo capacity, and also 
provides a vessel that is unusually seaworthy. 

"It will be noted that the 'R. L. Barnes' 
has no bilge keels, the effect of these being 
secured by the square bilges. Furthermore, 
the deck, which is slightly crowned, is per- 
fectly straight from stem to stern, and there 
are no bulwarks. 

"The designer, who is an old steamship 
captain with long experience on the Lakes, 
in speaking of seaworthiness said: 'I have 
had opportunity to study the behavior of very 
large flat-bottomed, flat-decked, square-shaped 
dumping mud-scows, while they were being 
towed in rough weather. When the towing 
steamer is pitching and rolling heavily, the 
mud-scow, which is loaded to within a few 
inches of its flat deck, is not rolling and 
pitching, and it is astonishing how very little 
water comes aboard.' The original idea of 
the whaleback was based upon these observa- 
tions and led to the construction of the 'R. 
L. Barnes' and her type. 

"With a view to reducing the depth of the 
ship to facilitate its passing under bridges on 
the canal, the depth, of the double bottom is 
kept as low as practicable and longitudinal 
strength is assured by the provision of a 
central longitudinal bulwark. . . . 

"The captain of the ship assures us that 
her'seagoing qualities are most excellent. She 



was caught in a recent very heavy northeast- 
erly gale off the Long Island coast, and when 
other ships within sight were making heavy 
weather of it this vessel was remarkably 
steady, the seas making a clean sweep across 
her deck and little water remaining aboard. 
The deck-houses forward and aft are built in 
bolted-up sections and are heavily bolted to 
framing that forms part of the deck-struc- 
ture. Here, of course, is a structural feature 
to which particular attention should be paid 
to insure that these connections are suffi- 
ciently heavy to stand up against the full im- 
pact of Atlantic seas. . . . 

"As showing the cheapness and simplicity 
of construction, Mr. McDougal writes us that 
the 'R. L. Barnes' was built without the use 
of bending rolls or furnace. The only fur- 
nace was a fire in a blacksmith shop to heat 
a few plates for the stern of the ship. The 
erection was done by a couple of electric 
derricks which hoisted the frames and plates 
into place. After the ship was built, the two 
traveling derricks, which are mounted on 
wheels, were hoisted on board and are now 
utilized for loading and unloading the ship. 
Their width is such that they travel down 
each side of the ship on the space between 
the ends of the hatch covers and the outside 
railing of the ship. As they move from hatch 
to hatch they are made fast to heavy eye- 
bolts in the deck. The current is furnished 
to them through cables leading from a gen- 
erator in the engine-room. 

"The 'R. L. Barnes' is an example of 
utility carried to the utmost limit; and one 
misses, of course, the graceful sheer and the 
faired-out lines of the standard type of ship ; 
but after all, this vessel is merely the logical 
and ultimate development of the typical 
Great Lakes freighter with its moderate 
sheer, its long line of hatches, and its deck- 
houses concentrated at the extreme ends of 
the ship. In this age of insistent demand for 
ships, the 'R. L. Barnes' certainly offers at- 
tractive features in her cheap first cost, great 
rapidity of erection, and large cargo-carrying 
capacity. She probably will find it easier to 
breast the gales of the Great Lakes and the 
Atlantic than to make headway against the 
currents of incredulity and the heavy seas of 
human conservatism and hostility to the thing 
that is novel." 



GERMANY'S URGENT NEED. 



"Facts inevitably force the conclusion that 
a German victory would lead to a terrible 
reaction in Germany," writes Philip Krantz 
in the New York Volks Zeitung, after quo- 
ting Karl Kautsky, the recognized German 
interpreter of Marxian Socialism. Hope for 
German freedom lies in the defeat of Ger- 
man arms, according to Kautsky. He points 
to the war of 1866, when Bismarck led 
Prussia into a victorious contest against 
Austria, and to the victorious military strug- 
gle with France in 1870, both of these con- 
quests having been followed by serious losses 
to the liberal forces of Germany. 

"Recent occurrences on the east front 
have had an almost similar effect on the 
German people," says Kautsky. "Last sum- 
mer a great majority of the German people 
was inclined favorably to the policies of 
the minority Socialists. This was evidenced 
by the lenient policy of the Reichstag ma- 
jority when it accepted the principles of 
peace without annexations and for self de 
termination of peoples, but during the last 
months the sentiment has changed com- 
pletely." 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Page 5.) 
LAKE DISTRICT— (Continued). 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

Branches: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, 111 4 E. Austin Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, Mich 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, Wis 309 Tower Avenue 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

TOLEDO, Ohio 821 Summit Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 35 West Eagle Street, 

Telephone Seneca 896. 

J. M. SECOND, Secretary. 

Branches: 

CHICAGO, 111 406 N. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND, Ohio 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio 85 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

CONNEAUT HARBOR. Oh'.3 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, Ohio 821 Summit Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. T 152 Main Street 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 
Marine Hospitals: 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH, CLEVELAND, O. 



Relief 
Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. T. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludlngton, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 
Erie, Pa. 
Menominee. Mich. 



Stations: 
Ogdensburg, N. T. 
Oswego, N. Y. 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 



SAILORS* UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 59 Clay Street 

Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C 1424 Government Street 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 1365 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 North 30th Street 

SEATTLE, Wash.. 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 65 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 6 

PORTLAND, Ore 88% 3rd Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 314 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 88 Commercial Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 64 Pike St. Viaduct, P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal . . 613 Beacon Street, P. O. Box 574 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 

PORTLAND, Ore 98 Second Street N 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 64 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 4* 

ASTORIA. Ore P. O. Box 1SI 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC. 

Headquarters. 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada P. O. Box 968 

KETCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
ASTORIA. Ore P. O. Box 138 



12 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




SEATTLE, WASH. 



The Brewery and Soft Drink 
Workers' Journal calls attention to 
the thirty-second anniversary of the 
birth of that international union, 
which was organized in Baltimore, 
August 29, 1886. 

Mis- Elizabeth Christman, for six- 
years general secretary-treasurer of 
the International Glove Workers' 
Union, has been appointed chief of 
women investigators of the National 
War Labor Board. She will assist 
women workers to present their 
grievances to the board. 

The International Union of United 
Brewery and Soft Drink Workers 
has signed an agreement with the 
Fleischman Yeast Company, which 
has plants in the following cities: 
Baltimore, Chicago. San Francisco, 
Fleischmami Yeast Company, which 
All workers in these factories who 
come under the jurisdiction of this 
international must he member- of 
this organization. The eight-hour day 
is recognized, as i- the six-day work- 
week and time and one-half for over- 
time. Wages are increased and ar- 
bitration provisions agreed to. About 
2, (MX) employes will be benefited by 
this agreement. 

Stat e-adm inistercd workmen's 
health insurance was endorsed by 
the Colorado State Federation of 
Labor at its recent annual conven- 
tion. A State insurance fund t" 
provide workmen's accident insur- 
ance was also favored. President W. 
H. Young, in his report, declared 
that an objectionable feature of the 
present workmen's compensation law 
is "placing the insurance with 
panies who fight paying the policy 
on the slightest pretext." The reso- 
lutions authorize the executive board 
to draft suitable bills covering both 
health insurance and Stale compen- 
sation fund for submission to the 
Legislature. 

The Wisconsin industrial commis- 
sion has awarded Peter lleruben, of 
Superior, $2,776.02 damages against a 
restaurant keeper for injuries re- 
ceived by a sausage grinding ma- 
chine. The boy was under 16 years 
of age at the time of the accident 
and the employer failed to secure a 
child labor permit. The commission 
has trebled the damages under a 
law effective last year, and the res- 
taurant keeper must pay heavily for 
hi- neglect. The award, which is the 
first case under this law involving 
a large sum of money, provide- that 
the employer must pay two-thirds of 
the compensation, or $1,851.28, while 
his insurance company is to pay the 
regular compensation, $925.64. 

There are plenty of unskilled work- 
ers who are in non-war business and 
they must be transferred to meet the 
demand for common labor in essen- 
tial industries, says the United States 
Employment Service Bulletin. The 
question is one of distribution and 
to meet the unskilled labor shortage 
State directors have been notified 
that there can be no temporizing and 
that drafts must be made upon the 
non-esstntial industries in their 
States. A strict order has been i>- 
sued again-t taking men -from farms, 
railroads, mines and other industries. 
It is stated that "an aroused public 
sentiment, which will brand as a 
slacker any man who wilfully re- 
frains from working at some pro- 
ductive job, up to the full extent of 
his capacity, will be more effective 
than any laws or regulations." 



Office Phona Elliott 11M 



Established 1S90 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-Date Method* In Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

COMPASSES ADJUSTED 

500-1 SECURITIES BLDQ. Next to U. S. Steamihlp Inspectors' Office 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Seat tit. Wath., Letter Liet. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 

not be held longer than 30 days from 

date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mall forwarded 
during that period, they should notify 

the Agent to hold mall until arrived. 

Ahlstrom, Ellis Lldsten, Chris. 

Anderson, P. W. Lee, C. L. 

Anderson, Wm. Lubhurs, H. J. 
Antonsen, Charlie H.Lundgren, Chas. 

Aso. Guss Larson, Ed. 

Anslltz, John Larson, Gust 

Abolln, K. Lux, Chas. 

Aase, O. R. Malk, Peter 

Andersen, Julius Mathison, Martin 

Anderson, Andrew Mlcholsen, A. 

Anderson, J. E. McGregor, D. 

Andersen, A. C. Maher, Thomas 

Andersen, Martin McDeod, John 

Andersen, John Magnusen, Lars 

Albregtsen, G. Marthlnson, Krs. 

Austin. H. Mlkkelsen. K. -1620 

Anderson, Fredhof Mlkkelsen, Holder 

Anderson, T. -20fi4 MIekelsen. Harald 

Baekshom. C. F. McGilllvray, F. B. 
Barry, W. D. 

Bates, J. D. McDonald, Win. 

Brown, Albert McPherson, James 

Brink. Harald Moe. Albert 

Bensen. J. A. Moore, Thomas 

Back, M. Moore, J. M. 

Barrv, B. Muler, James 

Boar'her, G. Nelsson, Emll 

Balstad. Alp Nelson, C. R. 

Bradburry, Edw. Nordfeldt. T. F. 

Burke, John Nelson, W. 

Carlsen. Oscar Nelsen, Steve 

Carlson, Harald Nelson, Svend F. 

Camper, L F. Ness. Louis 

Carlson. Eric Norrls, T. F. 
Christnffersen. johnNyhagen. Julius 
Cunningham Geo. F. NeIsen . Hans L. 

Caspersen, E. T. Nare, H. 

Carruthers, M. Nolan, J. 

Carlson, C. A. Nordstrom, John 

Carlson. J. -1586 Overland, Oscar 

Carlsen, C. G. Olsen, Harald 

Chrislensen. E. J. Olsen, Ole J. -542 

Crumllch. F. Olsen, Hjalmar 

Curran, W. Olsen, J. G. F. 

Drage, J. Ogga, Edward 

Desmond. C. Odall, E. W. 

Dunwoodv, Geo. Olsen, O. P. -1141 

Eaton. I. N. Olsen, Alf. 

Eekholm. B. Olsen. Geo. M. 

Edson, Frank Olsen, B. 

Endresln. I. Olsen. Elmer 

Edman, O. -551 Olllver, James 

Erlrksnn. Chas. Pakkl, Emll 

Eriksen, Erik Pap. Johannes 

Rllingspn, Erllng Powell, H. A. 

Forslund, Victor Paase. And 

Ferguson. B. Pallesen, K. 

Flansburg, Ira Petersen, John 

Feenes, I. O. Pendvllle, N. 

Fenwlck, A. Petersen. B. 

Fernnulst, C. W. Petterson, Oscar 

Forshlng, J. M. Rasmussel, Ole 

Oronhind, Oscar Rosen, E. H. 

Gahrlelsen. Peder Rallo. Max. 

Girndlsson, Ed. Rumqulst, Gust 

Gronseth, .Tohan Ryberg, T. 

Gronroos, E. Rydqulst, C. H. 

Grant, J. J. Rasmussen, Paul 

Gundersen. And. Rasmussen, R. P. 

Gtistafson, Oscar Rlsbech, H. 

Cunderson, C. A. Reld, W. R. 

Hanson, Ole Ring, W. 

Hansen, Henrlch Rise. D. L. 

Hansen, Olaf Rod. S. 

Henrleksen. Ch. Ryan, Thos. 

Heckola. S. Rylander, R. 

Henrlckson. Victor Sandberg, Otto 

Hernrs, C. Sedon. Geo. 

Henriksen. Geo. Snell. Adolf 

Illorth. Knud Soderberg, Albin 

Hnllman. W. C Swanson. J. -1331 

Hnhnstrnm, Fritz Sund. Alex. 

Holmes, C. Seyfreld. M. 

Holten, Crist Stotzerman. Emil 

Hunter, O. H. Swanson, "vv'm. 

Hansen, Lauritz Sagura, John 

Kmll Sandanger, Ole 

Hllllard, C. R. Sarin 

Halvnrsen. Hans J. Sauer. Ernie 

Hansen, S. -2072 Samuelsen. Harold 

TTetman, J. Setander, W. 

Herlltz. I. Skidsmo. W. A. 

Tngplhretson, O. E. Strangard, C. 

Iversen. Ole Sorensen, G. T. 

Jennings, Harry Sorensen, J. N. 

Johnson, Angl Raenlla, Arvid 

Johnson. Herman Svenson, Edwin 

Joal M B Thorsen. Herman 
Johnson, C. A. -2044Farve, J. O. 

Josefson, Ben Tempde, A. H. 

Jullsson, C. A. Torgesen. Laurits 

Jensen, G. Thoresen, I. N. 

Jarzenbeck, J. Trygg, Gust 

Jensen. Henrv Tornquist. H. 

Johnson, Olaf Wurst. Walter 

Jorgenson. Wm. Walker, J. H. 
Jorgenson. Fredrick Wirtanen, Geo. 

Krueger. Johan Wlnther, T. 

Kallanen, M. J. Winstrom, Oscar 
Karlson, G. A. -1190W1rta, G. 

Kattel. Joseph Wahlstrom, Eric 

Karlson. Tngvald Wehach, S. 

Klnff, W. Walsh. E. 

Kramer, Otto Westgaard, John 

Kulich, John West. Joseph 

Larsen, Martin Ween, O. 

Larsen, Fred Welln. I. 

Larsen, A. B. Wilson, S. G. 

Lawson, Arthur Wilson. A. B. 
Larsen, Nils Package. 

Larsen, Pete Johnson, Oscar 



EUREKA, CAL. 
Mercantile Lunch 

Is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy & Haakon's 

Proprietors 





SMOKE 




The 


"Popular Favorite," the ' 


Little 


Bea 

high 


jty," the "Princess" and 
grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 


other 


612 


C. O'CONNOR 

Fourth Street - Eureka 


, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNQ 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron. Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 
EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D 8ts., Eureka, Cat. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN. Prop. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention The Sea 
men's Journal. 



Sailors' Outfitter 
BENJAMIN'S 

The Old Reliable 

CLOTHING. SHOES. HATS. RUBBER 

AND OIL CLOTHING 
207 Second Street Eureka, Cal. 
E. BENJAMIN, Prop. 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER A HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIG STORES 

Store No. 1— Cor. Main and First 

Store No. 2— Westlaka and Plna 

8EATTLE 



Bonney- Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Creamatory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East IS 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. 8. SMITH 
Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats. Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor in New York Nautical College. 
Room 4140 ARCADE BUILDING 
Third Floor, First Avenue Side 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire- Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yasler Way SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

S15-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE. WASH. 



Cigars and Tobaccos 

Periodicals 
F. W. MOGENSEN 

217 E STREET EUREKA, CAL. 



DRUGS, KODAKS, 

STATIONERY 
The REXALL Store 

ATKINSON & WOODS 
F STREET, Cor. 2d, EUREKA, CAL. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention The Sea- 
men's Journal. 



Aberdeen, Wash , Letter List 

Anderson, Peter KanKaanpaa, J. E. 

Albers, Geo. Lampe, Fred 
Browen, Alexander Lehtonen. A. 

Braun, Alex. Markman. H. 

Bjerk, G. T. Malkoff. Peter 

Bruhn. Chas. Melners, Herman 

Brun, Mattia Magnusson. Charles 

Brant. Max Newman, I. 

Barrot, G. Olsen, A. 

Brandt. H. Olson. W. 

Bengtson. S. Olsen, Alf 

Davis, John Olsen, Ferdenan 

Eliassen, H. C. Petersen, Harry 

Flohten, James Pedersen, Alf. 

Proline, Robert Rahlf, J. 

Hedrick. Jack Rlsenius, Sven 

High, Edward Rosenblad, Otto 

Helander, J. F. Swanson, G. 

Heyn, Th. Svenson, Gustaf 

Jarisson, John Torin, Gustaf A. 

.Tansson, J. A. Thompson, Alex. 
Johanssen, John F. Valfors, Arvid 

Johnsen, Hans Wendt, W. 

Johnson, Hllmar Williams, T. C. 

Kallas, Augers Zimera, Geo. 
Khamp, S. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 
ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING. HAT8, 

SHOES. COLLARS, SU8PENDERS. 

GLOVES. OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN, Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders Taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

320-322 So. F St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



Phone 2S3 



"Ole and Charley" 

"The Royal" 
"The Sailors' Rest" 

Cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
219 EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH. 



TACOMA, WASH. 
HARRY W. LEVY 

CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS 
Union Made Goods, Hats, Shoes, 

Trunks and Suitcases 

Fishermen's and Sailors' Supplies 

(OLD TOWN) Tacoma, Wash. 

Main SStl 



SMHkf FR9 See that this label (in light blue) appears on the 
1V1 \J IN. t. rv >J box in which you are served. 



|Cy«\ i»—»nma bio mun'num'wwwMw >*"<*■ n»|i«»lw W>»» 

I unC«nuiil«at«i««*MiMM« 

' All S»«|W»l «»«»» lit* •*>> MiW«ar*1lil* 

V CMJUtfAmmrem 



LOCAL 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



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Home New» 



DC 



3D 



Cole H. Blease, characterized by 
President Wilson as unfriendly to 
the Administration, was badly beaten 
in the senatorial primary in South 
Carolina by Nat B. Dial. 

The Fuel Administration has called 
upon the public in States east of 
the Mississippi to cease the use of 
automobiles (with a few exceptions), 
motorcycles, and motorboats on Sun- 
days, until further notice, as a gaso- 
line-conservation measure. 

Government production of metals 
and minerals is proposed in a bill in- 
troduced by Senator Henderson, of 
Nevada, after conferences with Sec- 
retary Lane and Chairman Baruch, 
of the War Industries Board. It is 
said to have the approval of Presi- 
dent Wilson. 

The total actual cost of producing 
electricity in the municipal electric 
lighting plant in Cleveland, Ohio, in- 
cluding interest, depreciation, taxes, 
etc., is a little over a cent and a 
quarter a kilowatt hour (.0126). The 
average charge under private owner- 
ship is about nine cents. 

A reorganization of the War De- 
partment was announced by Secre- 
tary Baker, under which Benedict 

C. Crowell, First Assistant Secre- 
tary of War, will perform the duties 
of a director of munitions, and John 

D. Ryan, formerly head of the Air- 
craft Board, will become Second As- 
sistant Secretary of War and Di- 
rector of Air Service. 

A hearing was recently held be- 
fore the legislative committee of the 
Senate of New York on municipal 
ownership. There were present may- 
ors and representatives from nearly 
every city of importance in New 
York State. Every one of them, in- 
cluding Mayor Hylan of New York 
City, was in favor of the municipal 
ownership and operation of public 
utilities. 

The little city of Pekin, Illinois, 
a few miles south of Peoria, owns 
and operates a streetcar line. The 
people there are as proud as a pea- 
cock of their municipal enterprise, 
which is doing good business and is 
a success. The annual report re- 
cently issued shows that the average 
profits earned by the municipal line 
in excess of all expenditures have 
been over $5,000 a year for the last 
six years. 

Bernard M. Baruch, chairman of 
the National War Industries Board, 
has suggested to the Federal Re- 
serve Board that it work out some 
plan under which financial aid might 
be extended to industries that are 
affected by the war. His purpose 
is to assist industries that must be 
"skeletonized" to get maximum pro- 
duction from industries necessary to 
winning the war, and to soften the 
blow on injured industries and to 
prevent their wrecking. 

The Federal Bureau of Labor Sta- 
tistics reports that retail prices of 
food as a whole in the United States 
increased 7 per cent, in the one- 
year period, June 15, 1917, to June 
15, 1918, and increased 2 per cent. 
in the one-month period, May IS, 
1918, to June 15, 1918. Food as a 
whole shows an increase of 66 per 
cent, in June, 1918, as compared 
with June, 1913. The smallest ad- 
vance in this five-year period is 
shown in milk, with 44 per cent. 
Butter increased 45 per cent, and 
eggs 55 per cent. Fight articles 
advanced from 55 to 74 per cent, and 
three articles ranged from 78 to 87 
per cent. Corn meal, lard and flour 
more than doubled in price. 



14 



THE SEAMEN'S- JOURNAL 




The Newfoundland schooner "Bian- 
ra," which was towed to an Atlantic 
port after being attacked by a Ger- 
man submarine, v. as seized August 30, 
in Admiralty proceedings filed by 
fishermen who brought her in, who 
ask $125,000 salvage. 

Auxiliary schooner " Margaret Dick," 
of 1,050 tons gross, launched at the 
old Churchill shipyards, Hantsport, 
X. S., by Fauquier & Porter, has 
been purchased by the British Colo- 
nial Transportation Co., which will 
send her to Africa with a quarter of 
a million feet of lumber. 

Removal of the Emergency Fleet 
Corporation lumber headquarters from 
New Orleans to Philadelphia has been 
ordered in connection with the crea- 
tion of a new lumber division by the 
! hipping Board. W. J. Haynan, who 
has been assistant Lumber Adminis- 
trator, is named General Lumber Su- 
perintendent. The office of Lumber 
Administrator, formerly held by J. H. 
Kirby, has been abolished. 

Captain Leeland 1'. Hawkins of the 
steamship •'Yadkin'' and five other 
officers of the ship were found guilty 
of conspiracy against the Govern- 
ment by a jury before L'nited States 
Jndge Thomas I. Chatfield in the 
l'nited States Court in Brooklyn. 
The men took food for the Allies to 
Europe on the "Yadkin" and instead 
of coming directly back to this coun- 
try cruised about the Mediterranean, 
spending all their money and selling 
the ship's stores to obtain more to 
finance the cruise. 

Three of the nine fire boats owned 
by New York City have been out of 
commission for a time, it being found 
impossible to get from the manufac- 
turers, boiler tubes that were neces- 
sary to replace those worn out. Fire 
Chief Kenlon appeared before the 
Sub-committee on Risks and Insur- 
ance of the Mayor's Committee on 
National Defense recently and re- 
ferred to this condition. The state 
of alTairs was then brought to the 
attention of Judge Parker, chairman 
of the Priority Board, who recog- 
nized the importance of giving prior- 
ity to all fire-fighting apparatus and 
assigned fire equipment to class A-6. 

The Shipping Board authorizes the 
following: To carry out her great 
military program, America is build- 
ing a large fleet of transports and 
food ships. After the war this mer- 
chant marine will be used in Amer- 
ica's enormous ocean-carrying trade. 
It is to be expected that enemy prop- 
agandists should endeavor to use 
this American merchant fleet as a 
basis of arousing distrust between the 
Allies. Guarantees of fair dealing 
in this matter are found in America's 
unselfish policy in fighting for de- 
mocracy, in President Wilson's devo- 
tion to the cause of humanity, and 
also in America's past record. 

Standardization of the types of 
American merchant marine vessels i> 
the purpose of Charles M. Schwab, 
Director General of the Emergency 
Fleet Corporation. The aim is to 
simplify the standards in order to 
I up production, making fabri- 
cating much more easily accom- 
plished. There are understood to be 
now ninety one types of \, -,. U under 
construction. A conference recently 
held in Washington in which this 
ion was reached, was partici- 
pated in by Mr. Schwab. Edward N. 
Hurley, chairman of the Shipping 
Board; I'. A. S. Franklin, chairman 
of the Ship Control Committee, and 
.1 H. Rosseter, Director of Operation. 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 
PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement and 7th Ave. 
HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 29th, 1918 

Assets $59,397,625.20 

Deposits 55,775,507.86 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,286,030.34 

Employees' Pension Fund 284,897.17 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK, l'resident 

GEO. TOURNY, Vice-Pres. and Mgr. A. 11. R. SCHMIDT, Vlce-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE, Vice-President 

WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier 

A. H. MULLER. Secretary 
W1I. 1>. NFWHOUSF, Assistant Secretary 
GOODFELLOW. EELS, MOORE & ORR1CK, 
General Attorneys 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
JOHN A. BUCK A. H. R. SCHMIDT A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY I. N. WALTER E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. T. KRUSE HUGH GOODFELLOW ROBERT DOLLAR 



Pederson, Charles Peterson, O. -1551 
Pedersen. Henry G. Peterson. otto 



Pedersen, M. G. 



Peterson, K. T. 



Pedersen, Peter B. Petferson, Elnar E. 



San Francisco Letter List 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union office are advertised lor three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from the date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
S. A. Silver, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



Aagaard, A. M. 

Abianamson, A. W. 
Ackerman, Valfred 
Acosta. Miguel 
Adolfsson, John 
Alansburg, — 
AJuwe, Joe 
Andersen, A. F. C. 
Andersen, H. -2127 
Andersen, John 
Andersen, M. -2f>R4 
Andersen, Nils F. 
Andersen, O. -1301 
Andersen, Rasmus 
Anderson, Alfred N. 
Anderson, Andrew 
Anderson, Albert 
Anderson, C. 
Anderson, Carl J. 

Baah, M. 
Babchuck, Ernest 
liaekman. A. -ZU56 
Bahn, C. F. 
Baggs, H. L. 
Barry, Dick 
tsari v. iniiH 
Beckly, Christ 
Benrowitz, Felix 
Bergesen. Berger 
Berg, Sigfrid 
Berner, Albert 
Bernstein. Hans 
Berseth, R. J. 
Bertelsen, Kristian 
Bertelson, Oscar 
Berthelson, Charles 
Biron, E. 
Bjork, Martin C. 
Birhnes, Ole A. 

Calem, Anthony 
Call. Fred 
Carlsen, Albin 
Carlsen, Severin 
Carlson, C. A. 
Carlson, Carl 
Carlson, Seth 
Carlson, Warner 

on, C. S. 
Carsten, A. 
Cashin. J. B. 
Cassberg, K. G. A. 

Dahlgren, W. A. 
Dalhstrom, Arthur 

H. 
Dahlstrom, Ernst 
Dahlstrom, G. M. 
Daniels, L. M. 
Davidson, Waldemar 
De Bara, Harry 
De Moss, E. 
Delong, K. 
Dias, E. 

Edvarse, Frits 
Eglit, Brenz 
Ek, Chas. 
Ekelund, Rich. 
Eliassen, Adolf E. 
Hngel. Paul 
Engellen, D. A. 
Engstrom, Ben. 
Erick, John 
Erlckson, Aksel 
Erlckson, Erik 
Fagerlle, Odell 
Falk, Axel 
Ferguson, Emmet A 
Feschio, Paul 
Garcia, Jose 
Garfield, G. 
Gjesdal, Filing 
Gonzales, Francisco 
Grant, August 
Grant, Lewis 
Gray, Hamilton 
Green, Laurence 
Gregg, Harry B. 

Halvorsen, Henry Henderson, Robert 

Hamm, R. Henensen, A. 

ii, T. Henriksen, C 

Hannus, Peter Hentschel, O. J. 

Hansen, Charles Hess, Arthur 

Hansen. Chris. Hildes. W. 



Anderson, C. N. 
Anderson, F. V. 
Andersson, Hilding 
Anderson, J. -l'Jai 
Anderson, John C. 
Anderson, Oskar L. 
Anderson, Paul 
Andersson. A. T. 
Andersson, C. J. 
Andersson, Luck 
Andersson. Gottfried 
Andreas, Johannes 
Antonsen, Marius 
Ask, Allied to. 
Ask, Lorentz 
Auckland, Gus 
Augustine. Anthony 
Azarov, Daniel 

Blalle. Ernest 
Blair, Francis 
Blixt, Gus 
Blomgren, Carl A. 
Blomgren, Fred 
Blomgren, M. A. 
Blomkvist, Albert 
Borgen, Arne 
Borgesen, Oscar 
Borjesen, L. 
Bos, Johannes 
BreVick, Johan 
Brian, Jos. 
Brown. George W. 
Bra, Nils 
Brunwald, Harry 
Bye, Alf 
Bye, Didrick 
Bye, Kristian 

Chilberg, Benjamin 
Christensen, C 
Christensen, Harry 
Christensen, Oskar 
Christensen, Otto 
Christiansen, L. P. 
Christoffersen. C. 
i in istofferson, 

Gunval 
Clarke. J. R. 
Crosiglio, Joseph 

I s h i< ];.: hi Martin 
Diswert, William 
Dobbin, Harry 
Dolan, C. 
Donk. Johan 
Doring, Julius 
1 mn woody, Geo. 
Drasbek, Karl 
Duncan. W. J. 
I »yer, John 

Erlckson, George 
Erlckson, John 
Erickson, L. 
Erlckson, Nils 
Ernest, Edward 
Esterberg, Gust. 
Eucsen, Sigurd 
isen, J. L. 
Kvprsen. Petter 
Ewin, Arthur H. 

Ficht, Arthur 
Fisher, g. A. 
. ETreidland, Carl J. 
Frost, Konge 
Groth, Charles 
Gulhranson, B. 
Gulfeldt, A. 
Gundersen, Christ 
Gundersen, Hans C. 
Gusgron, Joseph 
Gustavsen, Anton 
Gussum, Joe 
Guthrie, R. 



Hansen, Harry 
Hansen, Jargen 
Hansen, Johannes 
Hansen. M -">R8 
Hansen, Oscar 
Hansen, Rangvald 
Hansen, It. E. 
Hanson, Arthur 
Hanson, Karl J. 
Hanson, Edward 
Harko. Anton 
Hauth. Carl 
Hawkins. C. A. 
Hay. C. W. 
Hazen. J. 8. 
Heln. M. 
Heldal, Trysoe H. 



Hill -1387 

Hill. — -2030 
Milliard, Chas. 
Ilicrth, .lens 
Hobbs, Frank 
Hofman, P. 
Hoestrom. Harry 
Holmes, Fred 
Holmgren, H. 
Holmstrom, Carl A. 
Holmstrom. D. B. 
Holt. Fredrick S. 

M I. Chas. S. 

Horton, B. 
Hubbert, John L. 
Hunter, John Lee 



Ibsen, Marius 

Johnsen, G. 
Johansson, Bernard 

Johansson, J. -s>so 
Johansson, John 
Johnson, Anton 
Johnson, Fred 
Johnson, Hjalmar 
Johnson, John 
Johnson, John E. 
Johnson, Julius A. 
Jonnson, Maddy 
Johnson, Norman 
Jolinmm. Ole 
Johnston, Leslie 
Junes, Fred 
Jordan, Henry 
Jorgensen, Robert 
Jorgenson, J. 

Knudsen, Daniel 
Koch, Gottlieb 
Kokki, Emil 
Kolbe, A. R. 
Koppel, John 
Korsberg, Volmar 
Kratton. R. M. 
Kraut, Charles 
Kristensen, L. P. J. 
Krlsnjan, K. W. 
K linger, Walter O. 
Krune. Chas. 
Kullborn, Oscar 
Kurgrcl, Oles 



Isakson, John A. 

isen, Jacob 

Jakobsen, Joakim 

Janerholm, Hans 

Jansson, Frednk 

m, It. HJ. 

Jensen. Anion 
Jensen, Henry 
Jensen, Johan F. 
Jensen, Lorentz 
Jewett, Charles 
Johannesen, Helge 
Juhannesen, Anthon 
Johannesen, Johan 
Johansen, Asm us 
Johansen, Chas. J. 
Johansen, Fritz 
Johansen, John 
Johanson, Robert 

Kaktin, Ed. 
iviiiloelg, Arvid 
Kamp, Charles 
Karlson, August 
Karlsson, Johan 
Karman, Wm. B. 
Kasklnen, A. 
Kaspersen, C. 
Klnamon, Jack 
Kirpin, Matti 
Kive, Karl 
Klink, Alfred 
Knaut, Charles 
Knechtman, W. 
ECnoppf, F. 

Labuhu. Frank Llndwall. Rirlmrrl 

Lageniuist, G. A. Lindquist, Charley 
Langworthy, ErnestLinsner, Paul K. 

Larsen, Alf Loberg, Bror 

Lassen, Arthur Lubbers, Henrick 

Larsen, Gustav B. Ludvigsen. P. L. 

Larsen, H. Lund, Axel 

Larsen, Rangwald Lund, Christ 

Larsen, Theo. Lund, Olal 

Larsen, Tonwald Lunugren, C. G. 
Larson, Cornelius -Hiss 

Larson, 1,. A. Lundmark, Helge 

Larson, William Lundstrom. E. vv. 

Leinasar, Jacob Lundquist, Axel 
I .' Ii liford, Alexandei Ludwigsen. A. 

Lewis. Owen J. Lynch, James 

Under, Victor Lyngaard. George 

Lindblad, Conrad Lyon, John 
Lindros, G. J. 

Madsen, Tom McNair, II. S. S. 

Magnusson, E. W. Mead, II. J. 

Mahler, Hans Meilink, W, E. 

Maki, Ivar Melander, J. K. 

Malmgren, Oskar Meskell, M. 

Malstrom. Erica Mess, William 

Marklln, John Meyer, H. 

Alarkman, Harry Miller, Elnar 

Martinsen, Nordal Milnor, C. v. 

Marshall, E. R. Mirabal, Jose 

Martinsen, John Mlrttinen, John E. 

Mathiesen, Axel Mitt, Mikke 

Mathlson. David Moller, K. A. 

Matson, K. A. Moller, S. O. 

AlcCormlck, Lau- Mortensen, B. 

rence Mulley. James 
McDonald, H. C. A. Morrison, Philip 

McGillivray, F. B. Moxnes, Christ 
McLeod, Norman A. 

Xaiincstad, A. NIewert, Aug. 

Neilson, Neil Nilsen, Conrad 

Nelson, Charlie Nilsen, Hans J^. 

Nelson, Ernest Nilson, Hjalmar 

.Nelson, Frank Nllsson, Hilding 

Nelson, Harold Noblanc. Loui* 

Nelson, N. P. Nolan, George S. 

Nelson, Rasmund Nolen, Axel 

Newman, Gustav A. Nordenberg, J. 

Nielsen, Carl C. Nordstrom. Bror 
Nielsen, E. S. -1116Nurkin, H. 

Nielsen, Kristian Nutcher, Lyle P. 
Nielsen, Svend G. 

Oakley. Loren D. Olsen, Herman 

Ofeldt. C. Olsen, Ingvald 

Okesson, Erick Olsen, Iver 

Olausen, Christian olsen, Johan S. 

Olgreln, Verner Olsen, M. -1491 

Olesen, Ingwnld ulsen, Mandeua 

Olsen, Amund Olsen. Nlcolal 

Olsen. AusKar Olsen. O. -1283 

Olsen, Charley Olsen, Olal S. 

olsen, E. -602 Olsen. Ole -1325 

Olsen, Edward Olsen, Regmar 

Olsen, E. F. -1280 Olson, John 

Olsen. H. -47» Olsson. Carl G. 

Olsen, Hans Ostergren, Josef 

Olsen, Helmer II. Osterman. John 

Paavllainen. A. J. Parral, Olegarlo 

Palhen. Geo. H. Pattenberg. John 

Palu, G. Paunu, J. 

lau Isen, Karl Pay ton, M. C. 

Paulson, Emil Pedersen. H. -12K3 

Parks, Leslie Pedersen, II. -13G0 



Pederson, Oluf 
Pedersen, Sofus R. 
Perkins. Will 
Perrln. H. 
Peters, B. 
Petersen, Aage 
Petersen, A. -1675 



Pettersson. T. -1734 
Plhkala, E. 
Pllcher, H. J. 
Pokos, Wasili 
Pope. B. 
Powell, H. A. 
Powell. Patrick 



Petersen, olav -lb'Jb Prestergaard, VV 
Peterson, Frank G. Price, William B 
Peterson. Gus Putkka, Werner 

Peterson, Mauritz 
Quickman, W. Qulrage, Juan 

Radke, Paul Rod, Sakarlas 

Ram, E. Roe. Berger 

Ramstad, Andreas Roesberg, Chas. V. 
Rasmussen, Karl V. Roos, Vrjo O. 
Rasmussen, S. A. Rop, Albert 
Heiun r, peter M. 
Repson, Ed. 
Kiisgaard. Soren 
Alfred 
jer, Michael 
Kobei ison, Koberl 
Uod, Halfdan 



Saarnio, Lennart 

. Dave 
saliaiufl, J. A. 
Sahlln. Nils 



Rosenberg, Adolph 
Rosen, \ all rid 
Ruckmlch, A. 
Ruger. Harry W. 
Rundstrom. Albert 
Kunnyulst. GuaL 
Ryan, Patrick 
Sorensen, S. C. 
Sorensen, Soren P. 
Sowlck, Bernard 
Spatz, K. 



Sandblom, Konrad Stein, Albert W 

Sandstrom, O. H. Stork, C 

Sanne, Rudolph 

Sounders, O. 

Sarin, Charlies 

Sarin, Wllnelm A 

Sassi, Vilho 



Schmidt, C. 

it, John 
Sherif, John 

Sirnensen, Arne 
Simos, Antonio 
Simpson, L. C. 
Sjoberg, Silas 
Smedsvig, Olaf 
Smith, Geo. C. 
Smith, John T. 
Sorensen, Jorgen 
Sorensen, O. E. 
Sorensen. L. A. 
Talval, Alfred 
[albert, Frank 
Tanman, Robert 
Tanning, Terkel 
Theorln, John E. 
I nomas, Nelson 
Thorn, Edmund 

1'horngren, Chas. G. Trygg, G 
Thorstensen, Blrger 



Stromblad. Olaf 
Strom. Karl O. 
Btrybos, D. 
Stupurak, J. V. 
Sund. Alex 
Svanson, William 
Svendsen, Henry 
Svendsen, S 
Bvensen, A. 
Svensson, John 
Sveelngsen, S. U. 
Swanson, E. -2675 
Swanson, Emanuel 
Sweeney, Denis 
Sweusen, Anker 
Swenson, Rubin 
Swlnbauer, C. 



Tillman, Andrew 
Tilt, Clifford 
Tomsen, Waldemar 
Tomson, Charley 
Toutt, Walter 
Trlho, George 
Trimmer. David 



Uhlen, Jack 
Valkonen, Veda 
Van Graff, Jan 
Van Kordencordt, 

W. A. 
Wachter. John 



Ulla. Chas. 
Vargas. Santiago 
Verkamman, M. I'. 
Verkamo, J. J. 
Vlckery, Curtis 
Wlchman, Daniel 



Wagner, Ralph W. Wlhavalnen, Geo. 
Wall, Alfred Wilkinson, George 

Wall, George Williams, John 

Wallenstrand. HarryWllllama, T. C. 
A'amser, A. Williams. W. 

Wank, Roman A. Wilson, Williams 



Ward, Joe 
Welsson, Emil 
Weltz. Hill 
Wesgard, Jens 
West. I. 
Westvik, I. 
Wezwager, Andrew 
Zeritt, John 

PACKAGES. 
Bertelsen, Kristian Mourlce, Francis 
Kkuali. Gust A. Nelson, A. -Km 



Winkler. Otto 
Wlschcar. Ernest 
Wolters. H F. 
Woodley. Clifford R. 
Wright. J. A. 
Wurst, Walter 

Zetergren, E. 



fagerberg, Ivan 
Frazer, Alex V. 
Hansen, Axel 
Irmey, Fred 
Johnson, Carl 
Johnson, Ivar 
Jurgenson, Julius 
Kerr, H. J. 
ualmqulst. E. J. 
tlortensen. J. C 



Ulson. Knut 
Osterholm, John W. 
Paal. K. 
Roach, Alfred 
Smith. John T. 
.Sparling, T. 
Sinim. Can 
Thymes, Oscar 
W eHgaurd, Jena 



REGISTRATION CARDS. 

Allias. W. Lauritsen, Ole 

Andersen, Ole Leaf, Frank 

Vnderaen, Ingemar Liebert, Rudolf 

Anderson, Jack J. Mattesen, Hans 

Anderson, William Mattson, Johan II. 

Anderson, A. 1S19 Oad. John 

\nli.c, Axel E. Olsen, Carl I>. 

Andrews, Harry Olson, Ola 

Benson, Severin Olsson, Otto 

Dewlhl. Charles J. Palm, Torval S. 

Edwards, Axel Pederson, Carl 

Kkli.r. John F. Pederson, Christ. .iter 

Flansburg, Ira Persson, Gust. 

Foreman, Nils Ratt, Sven T. 

Friend, Arthur E. Safley, Dave 

Haglrarg, Gust Sandell, John A. 

Halvorsen, olaf Soderlund, J. 

Haugen, Ole R. Svenningsen, S. X. 

Highland, Daniel Thomas. Henery 

Hinsen, Andrew L. Trigebretsen. T. 

Isaks.m, C. W. Villa, Ola 

lsaksen. [sak Weikman. William 

n. ESdward Werner, Chas. J. 

Kallio, John Wital, Ernest H. 

Knski. Juho Wulffers. W. J. 

Larson, John W. Young, William II. 
Lats, Alexander 



INFORMATION WANTED. 
Any member of the crew of "C. S. 
Holmes" who was present when (in^t 
Fondahn was hurt near Cape Flat- 
tery when in tow of "Goliath" on 
the 3d of January, 1913, will please 
communicate with Attorney S. T. 
Hogevoll, 627 Pacific Building, San 
Francisco, or with F. R. Wall, Mer- 
chants Exchange Building. 9-11-18 



WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

JOE WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 

Exclusively 

28 EAST STREET, near Market 
Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 1619 
Repairing Done While You Wait, by the Latest Machinery 

Work Called For and Delivered 
WE USE ONLY THE UEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 




THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 




WS.S. 



TOR SAVINGS STAMPS 

ISSUED BY THE 

UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 25, 35 and 50 cents per day, 
or $1.50, $2 to $2.50 per week, with all 
modern conveniences. Free Hot and 
Cold Shower Bath on every floor. Ele- 
vator Service. 

AXEL LUNPGREN, Manager 



Phone Garfield 2457 



HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 

Res., Randolph 27 
Office Hours, 9 a. m. to 6:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 

Prices. :: :: Union Made Goods Only. 

103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Jortall 


Bros. 


Express 


Stand and Baggag 


c Room 




— at — 




212 EAST 


ST., San 


Francisco 


Phone Douglas 


5348 



Kearny 3863 



JENSEN & NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



Residence, 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 

Phone Douglas 1415 San Francisco 



East Street No. 19, near Market 

TAILOR 

To the U. S. Navy 

GEO. A. PRICE 

(IS RIGHT) 

Blues— UNIFORMS— Whites 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING, ETC. 

500 Lockers Free San Francisco, Cal. 



French American 
Bank of Savings 

Savings and Commercial 



108 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

RESOURCES, $10,000,000 

Member of Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco 

United States Depository for 
Postal Savings Funds 

DIRECTORS 

G. Beleney J. M. Dupas 

J. A. Bergerot John Glnty 

S. Blsslnger J. S. Godeau 

Leon Bocqueraz Arthur Legallet 

O. Bodo Geo. W. McNear 

Charle* CArpy 3C D« Plchon 







Ask for this Label 
on Beer 



INT'L UNION OF 
UNITED BREWERY and 
SOFT DRINK WORKERS 

OF AMERICA 
Asks you to write and speak to your 




Ask for this Label 
on Soft Drinks 



STATE ASSEMBLYMEN AND STATE SENATORS 



• TO 



WORK AND VOTE 

Against the Ratification of the National Prohibition Amendment 
to the Constitution 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 

716 MARKET STREET— at Third and Kearnv 

UNION MADE STTTT«i AMD 

IN OUR OWN SHOP l » SaSSi B 1 *> U i 1 S> ^ND 

OVERCOATS 

to Order at Popular 
Prices 



Represented by 
E. PEGUILLAN 





JACOB PETERSEN & SON 
Proprietors 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



1918 EDITION 

AUDEL'S 



NEW MARINE ENGINEERS GUIDE 

With Questions and Answers — Price, $3.00 

EDW. QUINN, Phone Prospect 354 DALT HOTEL, 34 TURK STREET 



WORKERS UNION 



UNiowrerAK 
factory 



Named Shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Trea*. 



TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO ST., near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

•Nuf Sed 



Phone Douglas 3725 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 East Street, San Francisco 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 

OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 



1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Alaska Fishermen 

San Francisco. 



Anderson, Frank 
Anderson, Julius 
Blom, John 
Broman, Emil 
Burg, John 
Damberg, A. A. 
Duggan, Thomas 
Israelsen, Isak 
Johnson, Emil 
Jacobsen, C. 
Johansen, H. 
Kjendalen, Ole V. 
Larsen, Olof 



Mittchel, Joseph 
Moberg, Oscar 
Nilsen, Olof 
Olson, Anskar 
Oseberg, A. A. 
Paulsen, Axel J. 
Simmonds, J. 
Steen, J. J. 
Sheldon, C. B. 
Tamirsor, Peter 
Wikman, Daniel 
Weber, Fred 
Weisham. R. 



Any person knowing the where- 
abouts of Gust Stenusen and II. 
Reinke, please communicate with At- 
torney S. T. Hogevoll, Pacific Build- 
ing, San Francisco. 8-28-13 



Olof Nilsson, born in Hufvulsvik, 
Jamtland, Sweden, year 1880, height 
5 ft. 8 in., brown eyes, dark brown 
hair; last heard from in 1909, on 
board S. S. "Kurrachee," Karrachi, 
India. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify his sister, Mrs. 
Nels Olson, 1033^ W. First St., Du- 
luth, Minn. 8-21-18 

A. Ullman, second mate on board 
S. S. "Davenport" from March 1 to 
March 20, 1918, will please call im- 
mediately in relation to important 
matter, at the office of J. O. Daven- 
port, 112 Market St., San Francisco, 
Cal. 8-21-18 

Members of the crew of the S. S. 
"Argonaut," who were on board 
when she picked up the steamer 
"Jason," can recover their money 
promptly by communicating with 
Silas B. Axtcll, 1 Broadwa>, Room 
J, New York, N. Y. 7-31-18. 



News from Abroad 



An additional credit of $400,000,000 
was made by the United States 
Treasury to Great Britain on August 
30. This brings the total of credits 
to Great Britain to $3,725,000,000. 
The total advances to all of the 
entente allies now amounts to $7,- 
092,040,000. 

The Argentine Government has es- 
tablished a line of steamers to ope- 
rate from Buenos Aires to Punta 
Arenas, on the Strait of Magellan, 
stopping at numerous ports on the 
coast. The fleet at the beginning 
of operations consisted of six steam- 
ers. 

A report is abroad in Montreal 
that Canadian Pacific Railway inter- 
ests have been negotiating in Lon- 
don for the purchase of the Peninsu- 
lar and Oriental Steamship Lines, 
which run from Liverpool to India. 
With this connecting link the Ca- 
nadian Pacific Railway would have 
a complete service around the world. 
A dispatch to the Exchange Tele- 
graph from Copenhagen says the 
German Government, replying to 
Norway's protest against the sinking 
of Norwegian Government ships out- 
side the danger zone, has declared 
it will compensate Norway should 
that country prove the ships were 
sunk without warning. 

Foreign shipping at all Chinese 
ports declined by 1,738,760 tons in 
1917. The British Government con- 
trol of vessels under its flag during 
the year reduced the tonnage by 
2,264,356 tons. American tonnage in- 
creased by 325,242, the Dutch by 
248,444, and Japanese by 347,812. 
Freight rates were exceptionally 
high, and shipowners, especially Jap- 
anese, had a very prosperous year. 

Arrangements have been made be- 
tween the Governor of the Dutch 
East Indies and the War Trade 
Board to ship a large part of the 
big 1918 sugar crop of Borneo, Su- 
matra and Java, to the American 
market in Dutch steamers now lying 
idle in the East Indies. It is under- 
stood that the agreement reached 
will effect the movement of 100,000 
tons of sugar in the forty or more 
Dutch steamers. Normal American 
exports to the islands will continue 
subject to such limitations of com- 
modities deemed essential to the 
war. 

The sensation in the past week's 
news was President Wilson's mas- 
terly repulse of the German peace . 
offensive. In a few words, drafted 
in the course of a few minutes, he 
completely shattered an elaborate 
diplomatic document written in Ber- 
lin and mailed from Vienna by one 
of the Kaiser's messengers, Baro.n , 
Burian. More might have been said * 
with less effect, while nothing could 
have improved upon the mere 
promptness of the Presidential re- 
jection. To the Allies the American 
reply was an electrical inspiration; 
to the enemy its suddenness rather 
than its nature was a painful shock. 
European diplomacy, though believ- 
ing itself to be subtle, is really 
stodgy and utterly unable to under- 
stand American brevity and candor. 
That the leader of the greatest 
nation on earth should talk in telc- 
grammatic and perfectly intelligible 
language when replying to a mass 
of disingenuous verbiage came as 
an altogether too painful reminder 
that the day of the long-winded dip- 
lomat is passing, and the era of 
plain, democratic speech is at hand. 



16 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits 



Bobbie's mother had just taken ©ut 
her winter garments. "Ma," said 
Bobbie; "what did the moths live on 
before Adam and Eve wore clothes-" 
— Aw t; wan. 

•i hear that you said 1 was the 
biggest fool in town." 

"No, sir, I did not. 1 do not con- 
sider you capable of taking first rank 
in anything. 



-Boston Transcript. 



Barber— Your hair is getting very 

thin, sir. 

Customer— Yes. 1 treated it For a 
month with anti-fat, thinking it was 

hair restorer.— Boston Transcript. 

"Don't you ever change your mind 
about anything'" 

"Not often, now. I've found that 
1 am just as liable to he wren- the 
second time as the first."— "Boston 
Transcript. 

"I'm puzzled. My boy writes me 
from England that he's lost twenty 
pounds." 

"Getting thin, eh?" 

•That's what worries me. I don't 
know whether he's referring to weight 
or money."— Detroit Free Press. 

ITathush— So he's taken a house in 
the country? 

Bensonhurst— Yes, and he says 
they have running water in every 
room. 

"Not in the garret'" 

"Oh, yes; the roof leaks."— Yonkers 
Statesman. 



Willis— How do you like army 
life? Quite a number of new turns 
for a fellow to get used to, 1 sup- 
pose. 

Gillis— You bet. At night you turn 
in, and just as you are about to turn 
over somebody turns up and -ays. 
"Turn out." — Life. 



"Now, Lieutenant Tompkins," said 
the general, "you have the battalion 
in quarter column, facing south — how- 
would you get it into line, in the 
quickest possible way, facing north- 
east?" 

'Well, sir," said the lieutenant, 
after a moment's fruitless considera- 
tion, "do you know, that's what I've 
often wondered."— Boston Transcript. 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OI-D AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to Illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always In view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and is now, In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and Its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how Ignorant the seaman may he, even In the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and in a 
comparatively short interval of time. 




Christensen's Navigation 
School 

Established 19M 

257 HANSFORD BLDQ., 268 MARKET 

STREET 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. 




SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront 
since I 866 — over 50 years. Enough said. 

We DO NOT Supply Mattresses or Bedding to Vessels 

J. COHEN & CO. 



BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 



72 EAST STREET 



Opposite Ferry Post Office 



Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



Secure and Profitable 

The wise man keeps part of his 

money In a reliable savings bank. If 

you are making money now, why not 

put aside something for a rainy day? 

Savings and Commercial Depts. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



HENRY HEINZ 



When You Buy 
from Us, Liberty 
Bonds are Ac- 
cepted for Cash. 



Phone Douglas 6753 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
Original Size 




SOLID GOLD $1.50 
GOLD FILLED .50 



Diamonds 

Watches - 64 market street 

High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



BUY 

MEN'S 

FURNISHINGS 

AT 




Market at Fifth 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 
Phone Kearny 518 

Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Boots, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and OH Clothing 

of All Kinds, Watches, 

Jewelry, Etc. 

676 THIRD STREET 

At 3rd and Townsend, San Francisco, Cal. 



Bagley's Gold Shore 

Packed in convenient pocket 
poncher. Contains more good 
Smoking Tobacco for^ the money 
than any package for the price. 
Why buy tin goods and pay extra 
for the tins. 



UNION LABEL SHIRTS 

AT FACTORY PRICES 
DIRECT TO WEARER 

EAGLESON & CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO, 1118 Market Street 
Los Angeles, 112-16 So. Spring Street Sacramento, 717 K Street 

Our Union Catalogue of Shirts and Furnishings 

Endorsed by San Francisco Labor Council 

San Francisco Building Trades Council 

San Francisco Label Section 

Stats Building Trades Council 



Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Silverware 




nion 
Made 




715 MARKET STREET, Above Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



QamesJi. Sorensen 

i£r*a. ff/itf Jrto&l 
At the Big Red Clock 
and the Chime*. 



Jewelers, Watchmakers, Opticians 

Big Stock — Everything Marked in Plain Figure* 

THE ONE-PRICE JEWELRY STORE 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 



I Want You 
Seamen 
to wear 

Union 
Hats 

$2.50, $3.50 
$5.00 

"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

Deserves Your Patronage 




Union Store 
Union Clerks 



72 Market Street 

Next to Ocean Market 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 



ID SEAL LKjAI 10., MANUrACTUKSS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 

Phono Douglas 1660 



OVERALLS & PANTS 

UNION MADE ^ 

ARGONAUT SHIRTS 



uw 



yU T 









FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 


A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: 


Justice by Organization. 


VOL. XXXII, No. 4. SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1918. 




Whole No. 2506. 



u 



A WORLD SA FE FO R DEMOCRACY." 

Is Economic Strife To Be With Us Always? 



The enthusiastic adoption by our European 
statesmen and publicists of President Wilson's 
famous declaration that the object of the war 
is to make the world a safe place for democ- 
racy is either a momentous act of spiritual 
conversion or the last word in camouflage. 
For while no one would dispute the genuine- 
ness of Mr. Wilson's attachment to the great 
ideal, the past records of most political leaders 
in this and other European countries bear little 
testimony to the vigor of their new-found faith. 
While it is true that the forms of political self- 
government inhere in the constitutions of the 
European Allies, as in that of the United States, 
the spirit of democracy has hitherto pulsed 
feebly through these organs. Moreover, social 
analysis has made it evident that political de- 
mocracy is inseparable from industrial democ- 
racy, and that the complete failure of the peo- 
ples hitherto to attain the latter is chiefly re- 
sponsible for the defects of the former. 

No thoughtful democrat can accept the shal- 
low representation of the war as a conflict of 
free democracies, upon the one hand, against 
military despotism upon the other, or feel as- 
surance that the mere defeat or even the de- 
struction of the latter will in itself afford 
security for the attainment of his ideal. For 
while Prussianism stands, indeed, for the nega- 
tion of democracy, is the allied power which 
shall defeat it entitled to the positive assertion 
of that name? 

Invoking the Help of Beelzebub. 

To be sure, I do not here dwell upon the 
obvious fact that war itself, being the opera- 
tion of arbitrarily directed force, is the anti- 
thesis of democracy, and that every nation dur- 
ing the process of war is compelled to suspend 
many of its ordinary liberties. It is admitted 
that the help of Beelzebub must be invoked 
in order to expel the devil of Prussian mili- 
tarism. The necessary cost of this tactic must, 
however, not be left out of account when we 
regard the war as an instrument for achieving 
democracy. For it can hardly be denied that 
a prolonged suspension of ordinary civil and 
political liberties, not to speak of the fetters 
upon economic freedom, must go some way 
towards establishing the habit and temper of 
arbitrary rule upon the one hand, of unques- 
tioning submission on the other. In a word, 
war makes for a "servile state" with ever- 
extending areas of despotism, and the fact that 
peoples in the stress of the emergency accept 
this curtailment of their liberties docs not 
purchase for them immunity from the practical 
and spiritual reactions of this servitude. They 
v ill be less able to look after their own affairs 
in the future in consequence of this experience. 

In considering the possibility of achieving 
democracy as the fruits of a successful war, we 
cannot do otherwise than approach our subject 
by this gate. For the practical problem will 
have been transformed by the experience of the 
war-time. 1 must not be taken to prejudice 
the issue if I insist that we must realize at the 
outset that the reactionary forces, the enemies 
of democracy, will be more strongly entrenched 
when the war ends than they were before, and 



will be more clearly conscious of the need and 
nature of their defenses. 

The Difficulties of Demobilization. 

However the war ends, a profound sense of 
insecurity alike in international relations and in 
domestic affairs will for some time afford sup- 
port to the emergency powers wielded by every 
government. Military force will everywhere be 
at hand, and the disposition to use it, so as to 
maintain social and industrial order, will be 
rife among "the authorities." The difficulty of 
the tasks of demobilization and of restoring the 
tenor of pre-war economic life must involve the 
long retention of many of the extraordinary 
powers wielded by governments. Nor it is pos- 
sible to suppose that, when this early period of 
reconstruction is got through, the social eco- 
nomic structure and working of this or any 
other belligerent country will return to the pre- 
war conditions. The state, with its arbitrary or 
ill-checked executive powers, will be found in 
permanent possession of large new functions, 
political, social, economic. Railroads and mines, 
electric power, banking and insurance, chemi- 
cals and other "key industries," will either be 
nationalized or tightly controlled by the state, 
and local authorities will also possess greatly 
extended powers. Society, through its instru- 
ment the state, will keep an eye upon and lend 
a hand to "its" citizens and "its" producers 
from the cradle (and before) to the school 
room, the workshop and office, right on to the 
grave. 

The whole attitude of mind towards the state 
will have been transformed. Hitherto the bal- 
ance was heavily on the side of individual 
choice, private enterprise, free personal contract. 
Henceforth it will be on the side of social 
organization, public operations, collective co- 
operative arrangements. This is what must 
happen, whether we as individuals like it or not. 
As one of your own great men has said, 
"There is no way of unscrambling eggs." The 
war has shut off return to pre-war private en- 
terprise and free competition in industry, com- 
merce and finance. This statement, of course, 
must not be taken absolutely. It applies to the 
large routine enterprises. Great scope for per- 
sonal enterprise and lucrative business will 
doubtless remain in numerous by-paths and 
new developments. Tndeed, whatever business 
is left "free," there will be an active rush to 
establish combines, trusts, syndicates and other 
modes of successful profiteering. This will be 
one of the chief barriers to the realization of 
industrial democracy, for it will tend to sub- 
stitute lateral for vertical divisions among the 
workers who constitute the body of the "demos." 

What Is to be the Struggle of the Future? 

Bui the central problem will be that of the 
ownership and control of the new powerful 
state A complicated struggle for its possession 
must occur Between whom? What arc the op- 
posed forces in the battle for democracy? If 1 
reply, capital and labor, T shall seem to many 
In be taking a crudely class economic view of 
a situation in which many other causes, political, 
moral and spiritual, are involved, and to be 



offering a purely "materialistic" interpretation of 
history. Surely, it will be said, if this world- 
war has taught no other lesson, it has shown 
that every people sets before itself other 
aims than economic gain as of supreme value 
(whether these aims be political dominion, 
patriotism, honor or the supremacy of law) and 
for this attainment is willing to sacrifice all 
material goods, money, and life itself. Can it 
then be true that the struggle for democracy 
to come must be realized primarily and es- 
sentially as an economic struggle between the 
propertied classes and the proletariat? 

It is not easy to give a plain anaswer to 
this question without appearing guilty of gross 
exaggeration. The spirit of collective free-will, 
self-determination in the larger sense, cannot 
indeed be comprehended merely, or mainly, as 
an economic process. Its spiritual contents are 
comprised of all the human needs, aspirations 
and activities for whose satisfaction men and 
women work as members of organized society. 
Humanity at its higher level, in its better 
methods, appraises the economic process far 
lower than health, beauty, knowledge and 
spiritual goods, and the efforts to attain these 
latter play a larger and larger part in the mean- 
ing of civilization. And yet in a crisis like this, 
when civilization is literally shaken to its 
foundations, it is to these foundations that we 
must closely look in the process of reinstating 
it upon a democratic model. 

Democratic Control of Industry. 

Among the great nineteenth century prophets 
of democracy it fell to the most spiritually- 
minded of them all, Mazzini, to recognize that 
political democracy was inseparable from eco- 
nomic, and that the distinctive error of the 
French revolution and its sequel was the 
failure tc realize this truth. It is, therefore, not 
any overapprizement of material goods but the 
plain reading of history that obliges us to see 
that the first condition of a world safe for 
democracy is to set the ownership of property 
and the control of industry upon a democratic 
basis. Before the war this demand was emerging 
more urgently on the consciousness of the 
different nations, and was seeking satisfaction 
sometimes by peaceful, sometimes by explosive 
pressure. 

The political atmosphere was everywhere rife 
with economic agitation. When calmer analysis 
is possible, and causes for the war are sought 
further afield than the catastrophic events oi 
1914, it will be found that inextricably blended 
with the lust of political power which impelled 
the Central States and Russia to force the 
pace of militarist preparations, were the gather- 
ing standards of domestic strife, and that even 
in those other states which least willed the 
war, anil were most conscious of their purely 
defensive motives, the menace of internal dis- 
sensions was a secret contributory incentive In 
militarism. Nay, taking a still larger survey, 
the historian will find, in the commercial and 
financial forces that for several generations 
had been molding the imperialistic and foreign 
policies of the Western States, influences which 
wire secretly preparing the way for the u 






THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



t \ i table conflict. These economic motives were 
no< greater in the volume of human passion 
that they bore than the other political and 
social forces with which they coalesced; but 
they were operated with clearer consciousness 
and closer direction. 

If a society of nations is in the future to 
replace this aggressive anarchy, the selfish play 
of these commercial and financial forces must 
be stopped. They can only be stopped by the 
establishment of democracies which are at once 
political and economic, in which the peoples 
shall control the machinery of industry, trade 
and finance, sufficiently to prohibit class-war 
within the nations, while securing international 

I cannot in this very brief survey discuss the 
question how much state-socialism is involved 
in the process. For the really focal point is 
whether it is possible for the respective peoples 
to meet and to combat successfully the array 
of reactionary forces that will be in actual 
occupation of the seats of government in every 
country when the war is over, so as to win 
possession of their national governments. Their 
numbers, the mere ownership of the franchise, 
the formal right to elect legislators, will not 
suffice. These powers have in some considerable 
measure long been vested in the so-called 
"democratic" peoples. They have proved quite 
illusory. In no one of these "democracies" has 
the free intelligent will of a people been able 
to express itself in the legislative and ad- 
ministrative government. Why not? Because 
the popular will has not been reasonably or- 
ganized or morally determined. 

Hegel truly said, "The people is that part of 
the state which does not know what it really 
wants" (was er will). So long as this is true, 
democracy in any real sense remains impos- 
sible. And here lies the very heart of the 
coming conflict. All the intellectual and moral 
as well as the financial resources of the ruling 
and possessing classes that hate and fear de- 
mocracy (though doing lip service) will be 
used so to control and dope public opinion 
as to prevent the formation and emergence of a 
popular will reasonable enough to master the 
state, and through the state to reform property, 
industry and other social institutions. The press, 
the church, the school, the university, the club, 
the party machine, the library, the theater, the 
cinema and other popular recreations, every 
mode of influencing public opinion through poli- 
tics, social power and finance, will be organized 
as never before to check the intellectual and 
moral growth of real democracy. This is the 
vicious circle of reactionary powers with which 
tlie peoples struggling for political, economic 
and spiritual sovereignty, will be confronted. 

Popular control of government seems im- 
practicable so long as economic oligarchy keeps 
its hands on the levers of party and the organs 
of public opinion. But popular control of gov- 
ernment is necessary in order to dislodge the 
economic oligarchy, and to secure the means of 
liberating, informing and organizing public opin- 
ion. In order to break this vicious circle the 
s must conduct a simultaneous attack 
upon tlie political, economic and spiritual posi- 
tions. For only so can the will of the peoples 
prevail and the world be made a safe, or even 
a possible, place for democracy. — By John A. 
Hobson, Author of Democracy After tlie War, 
The Evolution of Modern Capitalism, The In- 
dustrial System, Work and Wealth, Etc. 



HEALTH INSTRUCTIONS. 



Provost Marshal General Crowder has 
called attention to a circular of instructions 
prepared by the United States Public 
Health Service for registrants declined in 
the draft because of physical disability. 
The circular, copies of which have been 
placed in all the local draft boards through- 
out the country, is the result of a recom- 
mendation made to General Crowder by 
Surgeon General Rupert Blue of the Uni- 
ted States Public Health Service. The 
Surgeon General points out that in the 
first draft about one-third of the men ex- 
amined were rejected for physical dis- 
abilities and that hundreds (if thousands 
will be added as a result of the examina- 
tions to be made of the new registrants. 

"It is highly desirable," said Surgeon 
General Blue, "that the men found to be 
disqualified for military service by the 
examining physicians of the local draft 
boards should receive definite instructions 
as to the meaning of their disabilities and 
that a strong appeal be made to them to 
correct these disabilities as far as possible. 
But the object of this measure is not only 



to reclaim men for military service or for 
such service as they can perform, but to 
lessen the burden of illness and disability 
among those engaged in essential indus- 
trial work. It is hoped that the instruction 
in this circular, which is really a primer of 
the physical defects of the nation, will 
reach far beyond the draft board and be 
utilized by all agencies interested in im- 
proving the public health to instruct the 
people with regard to their physical de- 
ficiencies and the ways and means by 
which they can be remedied." 

According to the United States Public 
Health Service experience everywhere 
shows that the proportion of persons with 
physical impairments is considerably 
greater in persons betwen 30 and 40 than 
in those between 20 and 30 years of age. 
This waning vitality at ages over 30, so 
commonly accepted as inevitable, can be 
postponed to a large extent. In this con- 
nection, it is pointed out that 60 per cent, 
of the physical defects found in the last 
draft were of a preventable or curable 
nature. 

In addition to furnishing all the local 
draft boards throughout the country with a 
sufficient number of the circulars to supply 
one to each registrant rejected because of 
physical disability, arrangements have been 
made to furnish specimens of the circular to 
life insurance companies, fraternal organiza- 
tions, labor unions, employers of labor and 
others who desire to reprint the circular in its 
present official form for wider distribution. 

The United States Public Health Service 
will be glad to furnish specimens of this 
circular on application and urges all or- 
ganizations that can reach large groups of 
people to reprint and distribute the circular 
and thus contribute materially to the public 
welfare and the national defense. 

The circular issued by the United States 
Public Health Service is entitled "Informa- 
tion for Guidance and Assistance of Regis- 
trants Disqualified for Active Military Serv- 
ice Because of Physical Defects." It is a 
four-page leaflet, containing specific informa- 
tion relating to the commoner causes of re- 
jection or deferred classification, e. g., De- 
fective Eyesight. Teeth and Disease, Feet, 
Underweight, ( >\ erweight. Hernia, Hemor- 
rhoids, Varicocele, Varicose Veins, Bladder, 
Kidney and Urinary Disorders, Ear Trouble, 
Heart Affections, High Blood Pressure, Lung 
Trouble, Rheumatism, Venereal Disease, 
Alcohol, Nervous and Mental Disease, and 
Miscellaneous Conditions. The information 
is presented in simple form and has been 
approved by the highest medical authorities. 
At the end is a striking quotation from 
President Wilson, "It is not an Army we 
must shape and train for war: it is a 
Nation." This is followed by the following 
personal appeals : 

"Do not go through life with handicaps 
that may be easily removed. Do not shorten 
your life, reduce your earning capacity and 
capacity for enjoying life, by neglecting your 
bodily condition. 

'While other men are cheerfully facing 
death for the cause of democracy, do not 
shrink from facing a little trouble and ex- 
pense to make yourself strong, healthy and 
fit." 

Over a million copies of the leaflet have 
been sent out to the draft boards. Requests 
for specimen copies should be addressed to 
the United States Public Health Service, 
Washington, D. C. 



WAR FOOD PRICES. 



Figures compiled by the Food Adminis- 
tration show that the farmer, going to 
market this summer to sell his produce, 
got $1.27 for every dollar that he received 
last summer; and the housewife, going to 
market to buy her supplies, paid X7 cents 
for every dollar that she paid last summer. 

The difference has been saved out of the 
profits of the middleman. 

For instance, the price of flour in the 
spring of 1917 was $16.75 a barrel whole- 
sale in Minneapolis. This spring it was 
$9.80 a barrel. The difference between the 
selling price of a farmer's wheat and the 
selling price of the flour that was made 
from that wheat was $5.68 in May 1917. 
In May, 1918, it was only 64 cents. 

These reductions have been made despite 
the fact that we have taken out of our 
market enough food to save our allies in 
Europe from famine. We have shipped 
120,000,000 bushels of wheat instead of 
the 20,000,000 ' bushels that we thought 
would be our limit. We have exported 
87,000,000 pounds of beef a month instead 
of only 2,000,000 pounds. And instead of 
only 50,000,000 pounds of pork a month, 
we have shipped as much as 308,000,000 
pounds. 

In a campaign to prevent profiteering 
and food wastage, the Food Administration 
in ten months imposed some 815 penalties 
on wholesale and retail dealers, commis- 
sion men, millers, canners, bakers, cold 
storage companies, brokers, grocers, res- 
taurant men and so forth. About 150 com- 
panies and individuals have been ordered 
to abstain from business in licensed com- 
modities either permanently or for stated 
periods. The others have been regulated 
by fines or minor penalties. In many more 
cases, the desired result has been obtained 
by means of warnings. And besides this 
work of the Washington headquarters, the 
Federal Food administrators in their re- 
spective states have disposed of a vasl 
number of cases on their own authority. 

There is still profiteering going on. and 
against it the Government is making a 
broad campaign, but shortage of shipping 
has become one of the great causes of the 
high cost of living, and that difficulty 
can only be overcome by building ships. 

The price of bananas has increased be- 
cause half the banana boats have been 
taken as army transports. There is a huge 
crop of sugar in Cuba, Porto Rico and 
Hawaii, but there are not ships enough to 
move it. Ocean freight rates on rice and 
tea and tapioca from China, India and the 
Straits Settlements have become very high. 
On tea, for instance, the rate has risen 
from one cent to five cents a pound. 

We used to import great quantities of 
hides from China, and we bring a tan- 
ning extract, called quebracho, from South 
America. Ocean freight rates on hides 
have been increased 500 per cent, and on 
quebracho 600 per cent. Our farmers use 
nitrate of soda from Chile for fertilizer. 
The rate on it has increased from $5 to 
$30 a ton. Equal increases have bellied to 
raise the price of jute and hemp, rubber, 
tin and wool. 

These are part of the inevitable hard- 
ships of war. The gradual defeat of the 
submarine campaign and the gradual sup- 
pression of profiteering art' working to- 
gether to reduce food prices. Both take 
time. But in both success seems assured. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



A Program for World's Peace. 

The Interallied Labor Conference has 
unanimously adopted a committee recom- 
mendation that the conference subscribe 
to the fourteen points formulated by Presi- 
dent Wilson as a program for world's 
peace. 

Representatives of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor, headed by President Gom- 
pers, presented these principles, which are 
as follows : 

1. Open covenants of peace, openly ar- 
rived at, after which there shall be no pri- 
vate international understandings of any 
kind but diplomacy shall proceed always 
frankly and in the public view. 

2. Absolute freedom of navigation upon 
the seas, outside territorial waters, alike in 
peace and in war, except as the seas may 
be closed in whole or in part by interna- 
tional action for the enforcement of in- 
ternational covenants. 

3. The removal, so far as possible, of 
all economic barriers and the establishment 
of an equality of trade conditions among 
all the nations consenting to the peace and 
associating themselves for its maintenance. 

4. Adequate guaranties given and taken 
that national armaments will be reduced to 
the lowest point consistent with domestic 
safety. 

5. A free, open-minded, and absolutely 
impartial adjustment of all colonial claims, 
based upon a strict observance of the prin- 
ciple that in determining all such ques- 
tions of sovereignty the interests of the 
populations concerned must have equal 
weight with the equitable claims of the 
government whose title is to be deter- 
mined. 

6. The evacuation of all Russian terri- 
tory and such a settlement of all questions 
affecting Russia as will secure the best and 
freest co-operation of the other nations of 
the world in obtaining for her an unham- 
pered and unembarrassed opportunity for 
the independent determination of her own 
political development and national policy 
and assure her of a sincere welcome into 
the society of free nations under institu- 
tions of her own choosing; and, more than 
a welcome, assistance also of every kind 
that she may need and may hoself desire. 
The treatment accorded Russia by her 
sister nations in the months to come will 
be the acid test of their good will, of their 
comprehension of her needs as dis- 
tinguished from their own interests, and of 
their intelligent and unselfish sympathy. 

7. Belgium, the whole world will agree, 
must be evacuated and restored, without 
any attempt to limit the sovereignty which 
she enjoys in common with all other free 
nations. No other single act will serve 
as this will serve to restore confidence 
among the nations in the laws which 
they have themselves set and determined 
for the government of their relations with 
one another. Without this healing act the 
whole structure and validity of interna- 
tional law is forever impaired. 

8. All French territory should be freed 
and the invaded portions restored, and the 
wrong done to France by Prussia in 1871 
in the matter of Alsace-Lorraine, which 
has unsettled the peace of the world for 



nearly fifty years, should be righted, in 
order that peace may once more be made 
secure in the interest of all. 

9. A readjustment of the frontiers of 
Italy should be effected along clearly rec- 
ognizable lines of nationality. 

10. The peoples of Austria-Hungary, 
whose place among the nations we wish 
to see safeguarded and assured, should be 
accorded the freest opportunity of autono- 
mous development. 

11. Rumania, Serbia, and Montenegro 
should be evacuated ; occupied territories 
restored ; Serbia accorded free and secure 
access to the sea and the relations of the 
several Balkan states to one another de- 
termined by friendly counsel along his- 
torically established lines of allegiance and 
nationality; and international guaranties of 
the political and economic independence 
and territorial integrity of the several 
Balkan states should be entered into. 

12. The Turkish portions of the present 
Ottoman Empire should be assured a se- 
cure sovereignty, but the other natonalities 
which are now under Turkish rule should 
be assured an undoubted security of life 
and an absolutely tmmolested opoortunity 
of autonomous development, and the 
Dardanelles should be permanently opened 
as a free passage to the ships and com- 
merce of all nations under international 
guaranties. 

13. An independent Polish state should 
be erected which should include the ter- 
ritories inhabited by indisputably Polish 
populations, which should be assured a free 
and secure access to the sea, and whose 
political and economic independence and 
territorial integrity should be guaranteed 
by international covenant. 

14. A general association of nations 
must be formed under specific covenants 
for the purpose of affording mutual guar- 
anties of political independence and terri- 
torial integrity to great and small states 
alike. 

The peace principles of the American 
Federation of Labor are based on the 
above declarations by President Wilson. 

President Gompers and his associates 
also submitted these economic principles 
to the Interallied Conference and urged 
that they be incorporated in the peace 
treaty : 

In law and in practice the principle shall 
be recognized that the labor of a human 
being is not a commodity or an article 
of commerce. 

Involuntary servitude shall not exist ex- 
cept as a punishment for crime for which 
the party shall have been duly convicted. 

The right of free association, free assem- 
blage, free speech and free press shall not 
be abridged. 

Seamen of the merchant marine shall be 
guaranteed the right to leave their vessels 
when they are in a safe harbor. 

No article or commodity shall be 
shipped or delivered in international com- 
merce in the production of which children 
under 16 years of age have been employed 
or permitted to work. 

The basic work day in industry and 
commerce shall not exceed eight hours. 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 

International Seamen's Union of America, 328- 
332 West Randolph St., Chicago, I1L 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes des France, 33 Rue Grange 
aux-Belles,' Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord, 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fryboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundt, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten 1 B., Sweden. 
DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade IS, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhavn 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nationale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina IS, Austria. 

SPAIN. 

Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo des Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's Worker* 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



The powerful British unions of 
shipwrights, blacksmiths and boiler- 
makers arc talking amalgamation and 
conferences to this end have been 
held. 

The American vice consul at Rio 
de Janeiro reports, in a recent com- 
munication, that a bill has been in- 
troduced in the Brazilian Congress 
providing for the publication of a 
quarterlj labor bulletin to begin with 
the date of the definite organization 
of the National Department of La- 
bor, the purpose being to furnish 
a medium for the exchange of infor- 
mation regarding questions of labor 
and similar subjects. 

The Italian Ministry of Shipping 
has cabled A. F. of L. headquarters 
at Washington, D. C, of the safe 
arrival at an Italian port of the spe- 
cial A. F. of L. mission to that 
country. The mission is composed 
of James Wilson, president of the 
Pattern Makers' League; F. J. Mc- 
Nulty, president of the International 
I'.rotherhood of Electrical Workers; 
John Golden, president of the United 
Textile Workers; Michael Green, 
president of the United Hatters of 
North America, and Peter Josephine 
of the Granite Cutters' International 
Association. 

The current issue of the British 
Labor Gazette states that "in July 
employment continued good in near- 
ly all the principal industries, and 
much overtime was worked by in- 
adequate staffs. In the cotton and 
jute trades, however, it continued to 
be restricted by the regulation of 
the consumption of raw materials, 
and short time was worked. Trade 
unions with a net membership of 
1,124,227, excluding those serving 
with the Forces, reported 0.6 of their 
members as unemployed at the end 
of July, compared with 0.7 at the 
end of June and 0.4 per cent, at the 
end of July, 1917. The increase in 
the percentage as compared with a 
year ago was almost entirely due to 
the cotton industry." 

Polish laborers in Germany are 
treated little better than slaves, ac- 
cording to such information as has 
reached America of late. The secret 
police interfere with meetings of the 
Farm Laborers' League, ostensibly 
to find out whether any Poles are 
participating in them. The German 
Socialist press points out that such 
procedure will hardly increase the 
in for Germany abroad, partic- 
ularly since Germany is supposed to 
be on friendly terms with Poland. 
The unions have recently been ham- 
pered in many ways by the military 
authorities. The former Chancellor 
had given them encouragement in 
some respects, but his successors 
have apparently adopted a policy of 
severe repression. 

That there is much suffering in Nor- 
way is indicated by the news that 
the Norwegian Storting or Parlia- 
ment has been considering the ques- 
tion laid before it by the Royal De- 
partment of Provisions, of granting 
the sum of $2,448,900,000, to be in- 
cluded in the budget for the fiscal 
year of 1918-19, which shall be used 
for giving relief to poor people suf- 
fering because of the high cost of 
living in Norway. The money is to 
lie used for the following purposes: 
Appropriation for war-time flour, 
herring, and fish, including fish mixed 
with the bread and margarine; the 
installation of drying plants for pota- 
toes, etc.; appropriations for public 
kitchens; and a sum to be placed at 
the disposal of the Provisions De- 
partment for emergency purposes. 



M. BROWN & SONS 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors* Union Hall 



LIPPMAN'S 

Head to Foot Clothiers for Men 

Fourteen Years in San Pedro 

532 Beacon Street 

531 Front Street 

Two Entrances 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 



1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



FRERICHS NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

529i/ 2 BEACON STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

Seafaring people who desire to take up navigation, San Pedro, situated In the sunny 
south Is the Ideal place. Captain Frerlchs has established a Navigation School here 
and under his undivided personal supervision students will be thoroughly prepared 
to pass successfully before the United States Steamboat Inspectors. 
TERMS ARE REASONABLE 



Phone Douglas 3725 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 East Street, San Francisco 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 

OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



S. G. SWANSON 

Established 1904 
For the BEST there is in TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
NOTE s. <;. Swanso 
with any dye works ami has no solicitors. 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2d Floor, Bank of San Pedro, 110 W. 6th St. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront, Cal. 



Information wanted as to where- 
abouts of Ray Wilbur, who shipped 
at Norfolk, Virginia, as an American 
seaman on S. S. "Lesseps" on or 
about March 1, 1917, bound for Brest, 
France. Address Henry Bowden, 
Counsellor-at-Law, Norfolk, Virginia. 



CUT THIS OUT! 

and send it with 25c and receive by re- 
turn mail Regular Dollar Size Package 
of our Famous Egyptian Beauty Cream, 

CREMONILE 
A Beauty Builder of Highest Order. 
You will be moie than delighted with 
the result. 

S. J. CHURCHILL CHEMICAL CO., 
Beaumont, Texas 



Carl Hansen, a native of Soon, 
Norway, age 35, formerly a member 
of the Lake Seamen's Union, is in- 
quired for by his mother, Marn 
Hansen, 778 Sixth Ave., Milwaukee, 
Wis. 8-17-18 




i i -'?v'''V:-r' ! '.'. 




Does Such an 
American Exist? 

Can there be any Ameri- 
can who is not doing all he 
can to help win the war? 
Who pretends to believe 
that we could have kept 
out? 

Who whines or growls about the 
little sacrifice he is asked to make? 

Who gets panicstricken and 
thinks that it would be better to 
compromise with the Hun and 
listens to the serpent whisperings 
of German propaganda? 

If such an American exists let 
him realize what Germany has 
done to Russia, which gave in and 
negotiated a cowardly peace. 

There is only one thing for us 
all today and that is war to the 
bitter end — war until the Hun is 
utterly and completely destroyed. 

For those who cannot fight, 
LIBERTY BONDS are the best 
possible weapons against the 
Hun. 



Buy Liberty Bonds Today 
Any Bank Will help You 



SL.I 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



At noon on September 25 the Foundation 
Company launched its fifteenth ship for the 
French Government, the "Aviateur de Terlines." 
Madame Collette Hamilton, whose husband is a 
lieutenant in the French Army, now with the 
American forces in France, christened the vessel. 
The Foundation Company is carrying out its 
program of "one every seven days," this being 
the third ship that has gone down the ways this 
month. 

President Remsberg of the Port of Seattle 
Commission wired from Washington, D. C, that 
the United States Army quartermaster depart- 
ment had given assurances that the recently 
indorsed Harbor Island dock project would be 
undertaken at once. This pier is to be built by 
the Government on the assurance that the Port 
of Seattle would take it over at the end of five 
years. The proposed pier is to be patterned 
after existing port properties. 

According to advices received from a South 
Pacific port, two schooners operating from Pacific 
ports by local shipping men are tied in a race. 
A vessel belonging to Andy Mahoney arrived at 
the offshore port after a passage of seventy-four 
days. Another vessel operated by Walter S. 
Scammell made the same port about a week 
ago, after sailing from a local port, in the same 
number of days. The owners have a wager that 
will be decided by the actual time each craft 
makes for the complete round trip. 

Narrowly escaping destruction by fire during 
the passage between Apia and the United States, 
a schooner owned by the Gulf Mail Steamship 
Company arrived at a Pacific port during the 
week with the bulwarks and a portion of the 
superstructure badly damaged and a considerable 
portion of the deck cargo of copra missing. 
The vessel brought 550 tons of copra valued 
at about $120,000. This was consigned to Atkins, 
Kroll & Co., who are now handling more of 
this South Pacific product than any other firm 
on the Coast. 

Owing to the scarcity of bottoms of all kinds, 
the Union Steamship Company is reaching out 
in all directions for charters to facilitate the 
movement of freight that threatens to congest 
at various points from which the concern oper- 
ates. Tt was announced during the week that 
the schooner "H. K. Hall" had just been char- 
tered to the New Zealand concern by the Puget 
Sound owners. The "Hall" is registered at 1237 
tons, and will probably be used to carry lumber 
offshore and products from the South Pacific 
back to the Pacific ports. 

The river barge "Pilot," first of a fleet of five 
craft intended for river transportation in the 
vicinity of Stockton, Cal., was delivered by the 
Cryer plant at Oakland to the Fletcher Wheeler 
Transportation Company during the past week. 
The "Pilot" is 52 feet long. 13 feet in width and 
5 feci deep. It made the trip from the Webster- 
street bridge to the Crowley boat-house in thirty- 
seven minutes, at a speed of twelve miles an 
hour. The craft is equipped with a new type 
Acme engine of 85 horsepower. The engine is 
being assembled by a new method which permits 
fast construction. This was the first of the new 
lot to be installed in a local boat. The Fletcher 
Wheeler Company is placing these barges in 
operation because of the increased demand for 
\<s>>rls in the Stockton district. 

Lieutenant Randall Rogers of the alien enemy 
inspection detail of the Navy and Lieutenant 
Sam Sackett of the customs inspection service at 
San Francisco have conducted an investigation 
into the probable cause of the fire on the Pacific 
Steamship Company's vessel which was threat- 
ened with destruction late last Wednesday night 
while steaming between ports of the Pacific. A 
portion of the cargo in No. 2 hold had been 
damaged by water and steam, but the vessel was 
not damaged. The biggest loss will be suffered 
by H. C, C. Cantelow, assistant general manager 
of the steamship company. Cantelow was send- 
ing his household goods to Seattle, and nearly 
all were destroyed. Quite a few individual tales 
of heroism were related by the passengers and 
members of the crew, all of the latter being 
members of the Pacific District Unions of the 
International Seamen's Union of America. 

With leading business and financial men of 
Hawaii pointing out that these islands are des- 
tined to become a great shipping center at the 
close of the war when the Pacific begins to 
come into its own as a bearer of commerce, 
the territory is beginning to look forward to 
the development of its harbors, and it is certain 
that bills for the construction of new wharves 
on a vast scale will be introduced at the coming 
spring legislature. Governor C. J. McCarthy, 
who, before his appointment to the executive 
office", was an active member of the territorial 
harbor board for many years, is one of the 
most ardent advocates of a big harbor extension 
program. Tf the 1919 legislature is agreeable, 
and if the necessary steps are taken, the harbor 
board may be given power to raise revenues 
for wharf construction and other purposes by 
taxing cacli ton of freight passing over piers 
controlled by the board. Under the present 
statute, passed in 1915. there is a little clause 
which specifically prohibits the board from col- 
lecting a tonnage charge on freight handled on 



the wharves. The only revenue the territory 
gels at present is a tax of two cents per ton 
per day on all vessels using the wharves. At 
this rate their maintenance is a losing game to 
the territory, and it is likely that a big effort 
to put a new tonnage act into force will be 
made at the coming session. 

Two American steamships were sunk and a 
fleet of other craft were badly battered, the city 
of La Paz, Mexico, was partially destroyed and 
the floating equipment of the United States naval 
coal depot at Pichilinque damaged to the extent 
of thousands of dollars during a terrific hurri- 
cane that raged off the Lower California and 
northwest coast of Mexico September 17. This 
was the news brought to San Diego, Cal., by a 
long-overdue fishing launch. The crews of the 
vessels that were sunk were rescued by passing 
steamers after being adrift three days in open 
boats. The American vessels that foundered 
after a terrific battle with mountainous seas were 
the steel steamer "Blackford," northbound from 
an Atlantic port with a cargo of 3000 tons of 
coal, and the wooden steamer "Coos Bay." Wil- 
liam A. Brown, first mate of the ill-fated "Black- 
ford," arrived at San Diego as a passenger on 
the launch from Magdalena bay. Brown related 
a graphic story of the loss of the "Blackford." 
He said that the steamer foundered at a point 
about 250 miles south of Magdalena bay, after 
the ship's rudder had become disabled. Drifting 
helplessly at the mercy of the waves, with two 
blades of the propeller and the rudder stock 
twisted into a useless mass of bronze and steel, 
it was seen that the craft could not much longer 
remain afloat. The crew of forty-six men were 
then ordered to the boats. On September 20, 
three days after the "Blackford" foundered, the 
boats were sighted and picked up by an oil 
tanker. The tanker, with the crew of the "Black- 
ford" aboard, remained in the south, short of 
fuel and provisions. No details of the loss of 
the "Coos Bay" have been received here, with 
the exception that the wooden craft foundered 
about fifty miles from where the "Blackford" 
went down. The crew were landed at a Mexican 
port. 

Claude Daly, manager of the maritime depart- 
ment of Comyn, Mackall & Co., has returned 
from a visit to Australia, where he went to 
examine trade conditions and to get in touch 
with the various representatives of the company 
in the commonwealth and New Zealand. During 
the next two years there will be little available 
tonnage to care for any considerable increase 
in the business with Australia and New Zea- 
land. There is a world of money down there to 
be exchanged for good American merchandise, 
but the ship space will not be available. In the 
meantime the Japanese have been busily engaged 
in building and purchasing ships, and fully 60 
per cent, of the tonnage arriving in the South 
Pacific consists of the Mikado's vessels. Daly 
said the Japanese methods were not entirely 
satisfactory to the Australians, and that the 
Americans were, on an average, turning out a 
better grade of merchandise. The question of 
priority affecting goods being sent to Australia 
and also goods shipped from this country was 
an effective barrier to increasing the business 
largerly at this time. Wheat and wool may be 
sent to this country, but there are so many 
restrictions on merchandise in general that a 
considerable American business is not expected 
to develop. He found upon his arrival at Syd- 
ney that there was a general impression that 
he had come there for the purpose of building 
concrete ships. This mistake was so general 
that some of the members of Parliament wished 
to know if the Government was defraying Daly's 
expenses. The visitor hastened to assure the 
Government officials that he had not come 
there to work on concrete ships, and then the 
excitement subsided. It developed that a news- 
paper story in a Sydney paper was responsible 
for the misunderstanding. Daly said that all of 
the necessary materials for concrete shipbuilding 
were at hand in Australia, and that there was 
nothing to prevent the Government or private 
concerns from entering upon this class of ship 
construction. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone, Sutter 
5807. (Advt.) 



SILAS B. AX TELL, attorney for the Eastern 
& Gulf Sailors' Assn., Marine Cooks & Stewards' 
Association, Marine Firemen, Oilers & Water 
Tenders' Union, has moved his offices to the 
ground floor of the Washington Building, One 
Broadway, New York. Entrance room J, ground 
floor. Consultation and advice on all matters 
relating to enforcement of the Seamen's Act, 
claims for Compensation or damages, will be 
given free of charge as in the past, by Mr. 
Axtell and his expert assistants, Mr. Vernon S- 
Jones and Mr. Arthur Lavenburg. (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' 

FEDERATION. 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS: 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRTOR, Secretary 

1%A Lewis Street 

Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md ADOLF KILE, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 

NEW YORK CITY GUSTAVE H. BROWN, Agent 

51 South Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa... OSCAR CHRISTIANSEN, Agt 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va...S. ALEXANDERSON, Agent 

123 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala CHARLES RAVING, Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La CHARLES HANSON, Agent 

400% Fulton Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex GEO. SCHROEDER, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I CHAS. CLAUSEN, Agent 

27 Wickenden Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y 12 South Street 

H. P. GRIFFIN, President 

W. L. CARTLEDGE, Secretary-Treasurer 

Telephone Bowling Green 8840-8841 

New York Branch D. E. GRANGE, Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 

Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass J. A. MARTIN, Agent 

6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La R. T. KAIZER, Agent 

228 Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK, Va WM. QUINN, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS WM. J. SIGGERS, Agent 

127 Twenty-third Street 

BALTIMORE, Md A. KILE, Sub. Agent 

802-804 South Broadway 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa. .O. CHRISTIANSEN, Sub. Agt. 

206 Moravian Street 

MOBILE, Ala C. RAVING. Sub. Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex...G. SCHROEDER, Sub. Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex J. CLAUSEN, Sub. Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 40 Burling Slip 

Telephone John 396 
New York Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 164 Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN, N. Y 110 Hamilton Avenue 

Branches: 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa 138 South Second Street 

BALTIMORE, Md 802 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va 127 Twenty-third Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex 132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex 221 20th Street 

BOSTON, Mass 196 Commercial Street 

NORFOLK, Va 513 East Main Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La 400% Fulton Street 

MOBILE, Ala 104 S. Commerce Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. 1 27 Wickenden Street 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 

Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Agency: 
GLOUCESTER, Mass 163 Main Street 



LAKE DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, III 324-332 West Randolph Street 

Telephone Franklin 278 
Branches and Agencies: 

BUFFALO, N. Y Tt. 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone Hanover 240. 

ASHTABULA, 85 Bridge Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 44 Shelby Street 

Telephone Cherry 342. 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, III 9214 Harbor Avenue 

TOLEDO, 821 Summit Street 

(Continued on Page 11.) 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



The Seamen's Journal 

Published weekly at San Francisco 
BT THE 

SAILORS* UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAUL SCHARR KNBERG Editor 

S. A. SILVER Business Manager 

'J- HUMS IX Al (VANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - - $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes In advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second- 
lass matter. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
nf i "\ ided for in Section 1103, Act of Octo- 

ber 3, 1917, authorized September 7, 1918. 

[quarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
59 Clay Street. San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side Only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2. 1918. 



• I NSCR 1 1 TION MARITIME." 



The British Board of Trade and the Ship- 
ping Controller are arranging for the com- 
pilation of a complete register of all mas- 
ters, apprentices and seamen (that is, all sea- 
faring officers and men), so that an effective 
comparison may be made between the present 
supply and the demand which may be an- 
ticipated in the near future. The opportunity 
of this registration will be taken to furnish 
each man with an identity and service cer- 
tificate, which, after being indorsed by the 
National Service Ministry, will be a pro- 
tection from recruitment, so long as the 
holder fulfills the conditions of his employ- 
ment in the Mercantile Marine. The identity 
and service certificate is to be produced by 
the man whenever he is engaged for service 
afloat, and will at first only be issued to 
1m ma fide sea going men. The scheme will 
be worked in close conjunction with the Sea- 
men's Unions and Associations of the Mer- 
cantile Marine Officers. Tn future, account is 
to be taken of the actual sea service of even- 
seaman, and it will be a condition of his pro- 
tection from recruitment that he serves afloat 
for a minimum number of days every year, 
due allowance being made for exceptional 
circumstances. 

The current issue of the British Marine 
Cooks and Stewards' official publication ex- 
presses some dissatisfaction with the regis- 
tration scheme. However that may be, there 
can be no objection to any reasonable pro- 
posal along these lines, as a war measure. 

Tn our own country there is a small but 
very persistent element at work urging the 
adoption of the French system, known as 
"Inscription Maritime." 

Those who fa^or maritime inscription as 
a permanent policy for America are doubt- 
less strong on theories but they surely are 
decidedly weak in knowledge of historical 
facts. Tt cannot be possible that they have 
read our own Captain A. T. Mahan's great 
historical works on the "Influence of Sea 
Power," the importance of which was con- 
ceded at the time of their publication, and 
are still in constant demand. 

Among other great historical truths on 
which Captain Mahan "proved up" we have 



learned beyond the question of a reasonable 
doubt that France in all her sea wars against 
Great Britain was never able to find the re- 
quired supply of skilled seamen. In the long 
run that alone settled the wars against 
France. It was compulsory inscription and 
compulsory service for a long period of 
years which caused the French seafaring 
population to diminish. England, on the 
other hand, with her more liberal laws per- 
taining to seamen and without any attempt 
to regulate every move of her seafarers, 
slowly but surely gained control of the seas. 
Great Britain's seafaring population, then 
as now. was the deciding and determining 
factor in many, many a struggle upon the sea. 

Just at present America is straining every 
muscle to again obtain a real foothold upon 
the sea. We are building ships as never 
before. We are inducing our ambitious 
yming men to take up a career as mariners. 
Surely, it behooves us to carefully examine 
the matter-of-fact lessons of history before 
accepting any proposal which would mate- 
rially' change the status of American seamen. 

Enthusiastic theorists are well enough in 
their place, but the future of our country 
upon the sea must be made secure by prac- 
tical men — men with a vision as well as a 
speaking acquaintance with fundamental his- 
torical truths. 



AMERICAN CITIZENSHIP. 



The U. S. Shipping Board Recruiting 
Service desires to emphasize the fact that 
the training given applicants for places in 
the new Merchant Marine is for American 
citizens only. 

There is, of course, no distinction made 
between native-born and naturalized citi- 
zens. Still, it appears that such a question 
is raised from time to time. The "Mer- 
chant Mariner," published by the Shipping 
Board Recruiting Service, comments upon 
this needless querying in the following 
pithy paragraphs: 

There is no reason why such a question should 
be asked. In a republic a citizen is a citizen. 
He may have been born in Europe, of parents 
who at the time of his birth had no dream of 
ever seeing themselves or their son leave the 
home acre where he came into the world. 

This is a place of wonders, this country of 
ours, and the conversion of the foreign born 
into good Americans is not the least of its 
wonders. 

The niachincry of the courts make of the 
right kind of men of foreign birth as good citi- 
zens as nativity on Cape Cod and ancestry going 
back to the "Mayflower." Incidentally it is al- 
ways well to remember that the Pilgrim Fathers 
were foreigners. 

Very often young men come to the enrolling 
stations of the Recruiting Service who have not 
been naturalized, but who have taken out first 
papers. Some of these feel grieved because they 
are rejected. To these the recruiting Service 
can only say, "You have started in the right 
direction. Hurry and finish the job. Then wc 
will gladly take you into the Merchant Marine." 

This war has served one excellent purpose, in 
speeding the naturalization of a good many men 
who thought in easy-going peace times that 
there was no particular reason for hurrying their 
naturalization. They sec now that there is every 
r< ason for letting not one spear of grass grow 
under their feet before they get the precious 
final papers that make them an American citizen. 

The editor of the "Merchant Mariner" is 
to be congratulated for penning so lucid an 
"explanation." 

There is now, fortunately, no longer any 
question about the value of American citi- 
zenship. To-day every American citizen is 
justly proud of that distinction. 

And what has made "American Citizen" 
(me of the proudest titles on earth? 

The pages of history that record the days 
m|' Rome's greatness and glory, note par- 
ticularly the value a Roman placed on his 
citizenship. The Roman always pronounced 



with pride "Civis Romanus." Yes, we 
find in the tribunals of justice when the 
prisoner was asked if he was a Roman 
citizen — we can almost see his manhood 
assert itself, and the voice clothed in pride 
cry out "Ego Sum." 

What did that "Civis Romanus" mean? 
It stood for monarchy ; for slavery ; for 
might over right. The pride of the Roman 
was begotten from the many bloody vic- 
tories won by Roman armies, from her 
treasures, the wealth carried by her legions 
to her capital. 

Not so our pride when we proclaim our 
title, "Civis Americanus." Our pride is not 
prompted because our land is the Eden of 
the earth. We know on earth's orb there 
is no other region so rich, so bounteous as 
our own America; but our pride has a 
higher source. "Civis Americanus" means 
that we are clothed with a citizenship that 
has put a ban upon slavery and places all 
men as the Creator intended — free and 
equal. Moreover, American citizenship is 
to-day proudly meeting the most severe test 
of all. It is cheerfully and willingly sac- 
rificing itself at the altar of Mars to make 
human freedom an accepted world institu- 
tion — forever safe from the attacks of any 
military monster. 



DID YOU BUY YOUR BOM> v 



While Germany's ears still burn from the 
curt refusal of President Wilson to consider 
its peace offer, a further humiliation is in 
store for the Kaiser and his befooled people 
when the voice of America is heard unani- 
mously backing up that refusal through the 
Fourth Liberty Loan. 

The loan is a necessary material factor in 
the prosecution of the war : not only our 
own military efforts but those of our allies 
depend upon the funds thus raised : the 
allied civilian population will get their food 
largely from that portion of the Fourth 
Liberty Loan we lend their governments. 

It is no less an important factor in main- 
taining the allied morale. No worse blow 
to German hopes will be dealt than they 
receive in the news, at the close of the 
campaign on October 19, that the world's 
greatest financial effort has been triumphant- 
ly achieved in the short space of three weeks. 

Germany is at this time floating its ninth 
war loan. In spite of her relatively small 
national wealth of only S80.000.000.000 die 
has thus far. through high interest as well as 
exerting extreme pressure on her people, 
succeeded in financing her war efforts. 

ITer hopes of solving her financial chaos 
have been largely buoyed up by the Chimera 
of huge indemnities to be collected from her 
vanquished enemies. 

The Fourth Liberty Loan will bring home 
to her that now, as one hundred years ago, 
America stands ready to raise "Billions for 
Defense, but not one cent for Tribute." 

( rermany has not yet lost hopes of victory. 
The war will not end until there has been 
further bitter sacrifices of American lives. 
Nothing less than the most earnest financial 
sacrifices here at home will provide our tre- 
mendous army with the munitions necessary 
to absolutely crush the Kaiser's actions. 

It is up to every man and woman of us 
to adopt the same grim determination to 
make the Fourth Liberty Loan an overwhelm- 
ing success as our fighting men abroad re 
solved to make every attack a victory al- 
though it means death itself. 

Buy your limit of Liberty Bonds today! 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



THE MANUFACTURE OF "MINES." 



Production of "mines," that dreaded terror 
of the sea which can be used so effectively 
in offense and defense, is now said to be so 
well developed that America alone has a 
daily output of one thousand, complete in 
every detail. 

This means that, should the exigencies of 
naval warfare require it, the Navy Bureau 
of Ordnance could produce annually 365,000 
mines. The bureau, however, is keeping so 
far ahead of mine requirements of American 
and allied naval forces in European waters 
that it is unnecessary to work on mine assem- 
bly or loading either Sundays or holidays. 

If all the mines produced by the Bureau 
of Ordnance since our country entered the 
war were planted (the same distance being 
maintained between the mines as in mining 
operations at sea) the mine belt would cross 
the Atlantic eight times. This satisfactory 
condition of mine production is the result 
of the development and standardization by 
the Navy Bureau of Ordnance, since the war 
began, of a new type of American mine. This 
new mine has all the advantages of the older 
types and practically none of their disad- 
vantages, this being particularly true in their 
loading and laying. The new mine must be 
one of the safest in the world to handle, for 
there has not been an explosion or accident 
either loading or laying. Yet experience has 
proved that these mines are a tremendously 
potent anti-submarine weapon. 

In the design of these mines special care 
has been taken to fulfill all requirements of 
the Hague convention. Should the mine 
break adrift from its anchor it is immediately 
rendered inactive by internal mechanism 
placed there for that specific purpose, and it 
floats on the surface where it can easily 
be destroyed. Should a ship strike a floating 
American mine the firing mechanism would 
not function. 

To obtain these mines in such enormous 
quantities, as well as to preserve secrecy re- 
garding their characteristics, a radical de- 
parture from usual manufacturing methods 
was adopted. Naval plants did not possess 
facilities for manufacturing as many as 1000 
mines per month, and such plants were con- 
gested with other work. It was impracticable 
to develop a great plant for the sole purpose 
of manufacturing mines, since there was not 
sufficient time for this purpose. The ex- 
pedient was, therefore, adopted of dividing 
the mine into many parts and having these 
manufactured at different commercial plants, 
all the parts being brought together and as- 
sembled, the mine being then loaded at a 
central mine depot. The work was divided 
among 140 principal contractors and more 
than 400 subcontractors. 

The unit cost of the new mine is about 
one-half that of mines before the war, not- 
withstanding the prevailing high cost of labor 
and raw materials. This is due to the fact 
that all the elements of the mine have been 
standardized in the same way that passenger 
automobile parts are standardized and that 
quantity production methods are followed. 



A copy of the Journal's index for Volume 
XXXI has been mailed to each library and to 
such other institutions where issues of the 
Journal are preserved for binding. If any- 
one has been overlooked please apply prompt- 
ly to the Business Manager of the Journal. 



The thrifty housewife should be careful 
that in buying at a bargain she isn't selling 
somebody's job at a sacrifice. 



PROTECTION FOR ENLISTED MEN. 



What the United States Government Is Doing 
for Our Fighting Men and Their De- 
pendents at Home. 



The United States Government provides three 
forms of financial protection for its fighting 
forces and their families: 

(1) Allotments and Allowances. 

Every enlisted man in the active military 
or naval service is under a duty to allot $15 a 
month from his pay to his wife and children. 
To these compulsory allotments the Government 
adds family allowances, ranging from $5 a month 
for a motherless child, and $15 for a wife with- 
out children, up to a maximum of $50. The 
compulsory allotments are the same for all 
enlisted men, regardless of rank or pay. Pro- 
vision is also made covering instances of a di- 
vorced wife to whom alimony has been decreed 
and who has not remarried. 

In addition to the compulsory allotments, the 
enlisted man may also make voluntary allot- 
ments to his parents, grandparents, brothers, 
sisters, or grandchildren, and, if they are de- 
pendent upon him for support, the Government 
may add certain monthly family allowances. 
Not more than $50 in family allowances will 
be paid on account of any one enlisted man. 

If the enlisted man is already making a com- 
pulsory allotment to his wife and children, he 
need allot only $5 additional to his brothers, 
sisters, parents, grandparents, and grandchil- 
dren, if he claims a family allowance for them. 
But if he is not making a compulsory allot- 
ment, he must allot $15 to such other relatives 
to obtain a Government allowance for them. 

By this system of allotments and allowances 
the enlisted man and the Government together 
make provision for the loved ones left behind. 

(2) Compensation for Death or Disability. 

This compensation is the modern American 
substitute for the pension. It applies to officers 
and enlisted men alike when employed in active 
service, regardless of rank or pay, and is pay- 
able for death or disability incurred in the line 
of duty and not caused by their own willful 
misconduct. 

In case of death, compensation, which ranges 
from $20 to $75 a month, is paid to the soldier's 
oi sailor's widow, children, and dependent father 
or mother. No other relatives are entitled to 
compensation. The compensation may be paid 
to a widow until remarriage, and to a child until 
the age of 18, or until marriage. 

In case of disability compensation is payable 
to the disabled person himself. If the disabil- 
ity is total, the amount of compensation varies 
from $30 to $95 per month, according to the 
size of the disabled man's family. In exceptional 
cases a sum not exceeding $20 per month addi- 
tional may be paid for services of a nurse. 

If the disability is partial, the compensation 
is a percentage of the compensation that would 
be payable for total disability and the amount 
varies according to the size of the disabled 
person's family and the reduction in his earning 
capacity. In certain specific cases of total dis- 
ability, such as the loss of both feet or both 
hands or both eyes, or for becoming helpless 
and permanently bedridden, compensation is pay- 
able at the rate of $100 per month. 

Compensation for death and disability should 
be clearly distinguished from the Government 
insurance protection, which is entirely separate. 
(3) Government Insurance. 

In addition to the compensation for death or 
disability, the United States offers its fighting 
forces the further protection of Government 
insurance. This insurance is protection against 
death or total permanent disability. It is 
granted, on written application, to all persons 
in the active military or naval service, enlisted, 
enrolled, drafted, or commissioned, so long as 
the premiums are paid as they become due. No 
medical examination is necessary other than a 
favorable report by the Army or Navy surgeon 
or medical examining board before acceptance 
into the military or naval forces. Because the 
Government bears all overhead expenses and 
the extra war hazard, the cost is extremely low. 
The terms are so favorable and the protection 
so broad that the matter naturally commends 
itself to all men joining the colors. The 
premium rate depends on the man's age, and 
for the full $10,000 averages between $6 and 
$7 per month. 

To obtain this Government insurance, the man 
must apply within 120 days after he enters the 
active military or naval service. 

In case of death of a person having so ap- 
plied for $10,000 insurance, the Government will 
pay, so long as there are persons living who 
are entitled to receive the same, monthly in- 
stallments of $57.50 each for 20 years, which, 
taking interest in account, aggregate $13,800. 
The insurance cannot lie made payable to any- 
one except those included in the "permitted 
class," namely, spouse, child, grandchild, parent, 
brother, sister, as defined in the War-Risk 
Insurance Act. 

In case of total permanent disability these 
monthly installments of $57.50 each will be paid 
to the disabled person throughout his life even 
though he lives for more than 20 years. 

Provision is made for the continuation of this 
Governmenf insurance after leaving the service, 
(Continued on Page 10.) 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 

Hadquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 30, 1918. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m.. Frank Johnson presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping good. Shipwreck Benefit was 
awarded to nineteen members of the crew of 
the ship "Tacoma." 

JOHN H. TENNISON, 

,, . . Secretary pro tern. 

Maritime Hall Bldg., 59 Clay Street. Tel 
Kearny 2228. 



St. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. 23, 1918. 
No meeting. Shipping slow; men scarce 

J. ETCHELLS, Agent 
Room 11, de Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 



„, . . Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 23, 1918. 

Shipping fair. 

WM. HARDY, Agent 
58 Powell Street E. P. O. Box 1365. Tel 
Seymour 8703. 



.. lacoma Agency, Sept. 23, 1918. 

No meeting. Shipping and prospects fair. 
„_ H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 

2016 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808 



_, . . Seattle Agency, Sept. 23, 1918. 

Shipping medium. 

o. o o P - B - GILL - Agent. 

84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 23, 1918. 
No meeting; no quorum. 

ED. ROSENBERG, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 23, 1918. 
Shipping good; members scarce. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
&8<A Third Street. Tel. Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 23, 1918. 
Shipping good; members scarce. 

HARRY OHLSON, Agent. 
128^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 16, 1918. 
Shipping dull. 

R. H. BLACKWOOD, Agent 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 26, 1918. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secre- 
tary reported shipping good. The full Shipwreck 
Benefit was ordered paid to one member wrecked 
on the ship "Tacoma." A resolution to vote 
upon the purchase of $2000 of the 4th Liberty 
Bond issue was referred to a referendum vote 
of the coast. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market Street. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 20, 1918. 
No meeting. Shipping fair. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203. Phone Main 
2233. P. O. Box 214. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 18, 1918, 
Shipping very good; shipping good, but sln.it 
of members. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
Sepulveda Bldg., 128^ Sixth Street. Phone, 
Home 115; Sunset 66 W. 



DIED. 

Robert I). Hendersen, No. 2630, a native of 
Denmark, age 50. Died at Libbyville, Alaska- 
June 8, 1918. 

A. P. Traynor, No. 1100, a native of Ireland, 
age 39. Died at Victoria, B. C, Sept. IS, 1918. 



Interest in Portland, Oregon, as an export 
port is developing, and, while plans arc being 
matured for operating companies to handle the 
trade after the war, outside shipping firms arc 
establishing offices in the city to get a first 
hold on the business. The Sudden & Christen- 
son Co. of San Francisco was the first to locate 
there, and has been taking ships from the Finn 
gency Meet Corporation for operation out of 
Portland and other Pacific ports, f.yng & Picks, 
San Francisco, is the latest firm to enter the 
lists. Offices for this firm have been opened 
and plans are being made for regular operation 
of ships from Portland. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



OUR WASHINGTON LETTER. 

(By Laurence Todd.) 



So serious lias become the situation at 
Bridgeport, where the workers belonging 
to the Machinists' Lodge have appealed for 
another interpretation of the Eidlitz award 
which caused the recent strike, that the 
National War Labor Board has broken its 
date For hearings in Minneapolis for Sep- 
tember 23 and lias gone to Bridgeport in- 
stead. 

Under the Eidlitz award, the men and 
women employed in the war industries in 
Bridgeport were to meet in the school 
houses and elect delegates to a city con- 
vention, which in turn was to name candi- 
dates for the Central Appeal Board. This 
Central Board was then to arrange for the 
election of shop committees for each shop. 
During the strike the elections were held. 
None of the strikers could vote. All the 
voters and all the persons elected as dele- 
gates to the convention were non-union — 
the union men were all out. But the 
shop committees are still to be cl 
and the union men. who are in the propor- 
tion of about one to nine of the unskilled, 
non-union employes, are likely to be elected 
to fill most of these shop committees. 

It is unlikely that the War Labor Hoard 
will be able to so reverse the award as 
to give the Machinists the trade classifica- 
tion for which they struck, but it will give 
them a way to secure the classification 
within a few months. 

The most unfortunate thing about the 
Bridgeport trouble is the fact that th 
per cent, who are unskilled are not now 
being organized, as they easily could be 
organized, into the American Federation 
of Labor. The organized men in the town, 
know just what they want. The unor- 
ganized have only the vaguest notion. 

In the absence of the clear industrial 
thinking that comes with unionism, the 
War Labor Board has started a new ex- 
periment. It has employed a community 
secretary for each of the nine public 
schools in Bridgeport, together with a 
general secretary for the entire city. These 
secretaries have charge of arranging meet- 
ings of all sorts of groups, but especially 
of labor groups, in the school buildings. 
All the workers are to be brought in, so 
far as possible, to these community meet- 
ings, to discuss their industrial conditions 
and to learn to work together in meeting 
them. At the tirst of these meetings, the 
coming week, Miss Margaret Wilson, 
daughter of President Wilson, has been 
invited to speak. She has been active 
for some years in the movement to open 
the school houses, all over the country, to 
community meetings of this kind. Frank 
P. Walsh of the War Labor Hoard has 
been a leader in the same agitation. 

On its way to Bridgeport the War 
Labor Board made public in New York 
City the award of Chief Justice Clark of 
the North Carolina Supreme Court as 
umpire in the case of the Wheeling Mold 
& foundry Co. Justice Clark establishes 
in this award the genuine eight-hour day. 
lie provides that the only way in which 
more than eight hours can be worked is 
through tin- decision that an emergency 
exists in connection with a particular job. 
And that decision must be the decision of 
a committee composed of the workers and 
the management, equally represented. 



This is a pivotal decision. Justice Clark 
was chosen by the board as umpire in this 
case, and his ruling that the eight-hour 
day must be an eight-hour day in good 
faith, and not a ten-hour day with a few- 
cents of overtime, is to be applied to all 
similar cases as they shall come before 
the board. 

In the course of his statement, Justice 
Clark points out that while the principles on 
which the War Labor Board was established 
do not require the enforcement of an eight- 
hour rule, yet they do require that in cases 
where the basic eight-hour day is not manda- 
tory by law "the question of hours of labor 
shall be settled with due regard to Govern- 
mental necessities and the welfare, health 
and proper comfort of the workers." 

lie ([notes President Wilson's address to 
Congress on the railroad eight-hour dispute, 
in August, 1916, when the President said 
of the eight-hour day: "It has been ad- 
judged by the thought and experience of 
recent years a thing upon which society is 
justified in insisting, as in the interest of 
health, efficiency, contentment and a general 
increase of economic vigor." He quotes also 
from Judge Alschuler's decision in the pack- 
ing house workers' case, and he declares that 
the time is here to establish the shorter day 
in industry. When overtime is to be worked, 
he believes that the emergency should be 
one that the workers themselves will readily 
recognize and accept. 

This eight-hour award is a valuable addi- 
tion to the series of points decided thus far, 
which the War Labor Board will apply in 
other cases as they are taken up. Some 
anxiety has been shown, in various cities, 
because the Board has not come promptly to 
hear their local disputes and act upon them. 
The War Labor Board is still in the stage of 
developing its organization, trying out its 
ability to handle various kinds of industrial 
statesmanship, and of getting local machinery 
started to take care of the enforcement of 
its awards. But the field is now becoming 
pretty well defined, and the Board is striking 
a gait that will carry it over a very long 
circuit within a few months. Hearings will 
be held in all the cities to which pledges 
have been given, with only a very few days 
of delay. Minneapolis, for example, will be 
visited within ten days or two weeks, accord- 
ing to the best estimate today. The Bridge- 
port trouble, due to an award by an umpire 
who proved to be out of sympathy with or- 
ganized labor, has only temporarily upset the 
schedule. 

Mention of the railroad men's eight-hour 
dispute recalls the fact that one of the mem- 
bers of Congress who most actively fought 
that legislation was Simeon D. Fess of Ohio, 
now chairman of the Republican congres- 
sional campaign committee. When asked, in 
debate in the House last New Year's day, 
why Ohio gave so big a vote for the Presi- 
dent in 1916, he replied that one of the chief 
reasons was the "shameful surrender" of the 
Administration to the railroad brotherh 

The brotherhoods are reminding Fees' con- 
stituents of that fact this year. They are also 
sending into the districts of a large number 
of other Congressmen the report of their 
legislative agents on the labor records of 
those Congressmen. Especially bad. they de- 
clare, is the record of Representative Miller 
of Duluth, whose opponent is a member of 
the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers. 
Miller has voted against almost every do- 
mestic measure in which organized labor has 



taken any interest, including the Adamson 
law. 

The National Security League and other 
similar organizations appear to have taken 
the job of opposing the labor members of 
Congress in this election, and presumably 
they will support Miller. This prospect an- 
noys the railroad brotherhoods. Director-Gen- 
eral McAdoo has withdrawn — at least for 
the period of this year's campaign — his order 
that railroad employes should not run for 
public office, and the brotherhoods are doing 
more work in that field now than ever before. 

Arthur llol<ler. former legislative agent of 
the A. F. of I... was one of the crowd of 
liberals who gathered at the lunch of the 
Round Table Forum, the other day, to ask 
questions of Chairman Colver of the Federal 
Trade Commission. This Round Table Forum 
has been organized by the National Popular 
Government League, to keep public officials 
and others, here in Washington, in touch 
with the real fights that are going on in 
Congress. Just now the big fight is over the 
Stockyards and wholesale meat houses and 
warehouses. The Federal Trade Commission 
wants Congress to take them into Govern- 
ment ownership and operation. 

Holder asked just one question: "When 
will the price of steak come down?" 

Colver answered: "As soon as there is a 
free channel of trade between the farmer 
who produces the livestock and the consumer 
who eats the meat at his table." 

The packers are hanging on to their mo- 
nopoly of the marketing channels. 
* * * 

Miss Julia O'Connor of Boston, leader of 
the telephone operators' strike there, has been 
named by Postmaster General Burleson to 
his committee on wages and conditions of 
labor of the employes in the telephone and 
telegraph service. But what is more signifi- 
cant, he names her as "representing the or- 
ganized telephone workers of the country." 
That is his first recognition of anybody, in 
any line of public service under his control, 
as a representative of union labor. 

The Commercial Telegraphers' Union is 
organizing, and waiting, and watching these 
gradual concessions to the spirit of the times. 



FROM FRENCH WRITERS. 



French sentiments are expressed in the 
followiii. 

Despotism is a criminal attack upon the 
brotherhood of man. — Fenclon. 

Political liberty: The happy mean which 
makes all citizens subject to the laws and 
equally interested in their observance. — 
Montesquieu. 

There is only one kind of equality in- 
herent in man; it is that of the virtu 
Malesherbes. 

Equality is the beautiful ideal of the 
body politic. — D'Alcmbert. 

To renounce our liberty is to renounce 
the equality of man, the right of humanity 
and even our duty. — Rousseau. 

Tt is this celestial voice (of the will of 
all) that dictates to every citizen the pre- 
cepts of public reason and teaches him to 
act according to the maxims of his own 
judgment. — Rousseau. 

Cod and liberty. (Voltaire's words when 
blessing Benjamin Franklin's grandson.) 



Analyze almost any radical "ism" and you 
will find that it is composed mainly of solec- 
ism and cynicism. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



9 



STEEL TRUST BECOMES GENEROUS. 



The United States Steel Corporation has 
announced that it will inaugurate the eight- 
hour basic day in all its plants on October 
1st. This revolutionary measure directly in- 
volves 225,000 employes of the big steel 
combination, and indirectly several hundred 
thousand employes of independent steel 
companies. And probably before the effects 
of it are over it will mean that every work- 
ing man in America will be put upon an 
eight-hour basis. 

Eour months ago, Judge Gary, chairman 
of the Board of Directors of the United 
States Steel Corporation, stated definitely 
and positively that the question of the 
hours of labor had been acted upon by his 
board and that there would be no eight- 
hour day in the steel plants. And now 
he comes along and throws this resolve 
into the waste basket, and, almost over 
night as it were, establishes the basic eight- 
hour day in all the corporation's monster 
plants. 

Why this sudden change of front? The 
answer is not difficult to discover. It is to 
be found in the great campaign the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor and twenty-four 
international unions are now carrying on to 
organize the iron and steel workers of the 
country. This campaign is proving an un- 
precedented success. In the Calumet Dis- 
trict around Chicago, which includes Gary, 
Indiana Harbor, South Chicago, and Joliet, 
it has been making tremendous headway. 
Monster meetings are being held and 
thousands of workers are pouring into all 
the affiliated organizations. Never in the 
history of the country has the like been 
seen. While this is going on in the Chicago 
District, the workers in the great Bethle- 
hem Steel plants are likewise organizing by 
the thousands, and extensive preparations 
are on foot for similar campaigns in the 
other steel districts of the country. 

Something had to be done to head oft' 
all this organization work. In the old days 
the proper thing for the steel barons to 
have done under the circumstances would 
have been to import a corps of gunmen and 
shoot the thing to pieces, to force the 
workers out in some ill-timed strike, or, if 
these failed, to give them a penny or two 
an hour increase. But the time for the suc- 
cess of these tactics is now past and newer 
methods must be employed. Hence, Tudge 
Gary's revolutionary ruling that the eight- 
hour day would be put into effect at once. 

The scope of this decision is far-reaching 
enough to almost bewilder the imagination. 
It means shortening the hours of labor of 
every man on the American continent. We 
may rest assured that the great steel 
barons never ventured to take such a radi- 
cal step unless they were perfectly certain 
that it would accomplish the thing it was 
aimed to do; namely, to prevent the or- 
ganization of the steel workers. But will 
it succeed? We doubt it most seriously. 
The steel workers now have the spirit of 
organization and nothing in the world can 
stop them, if organized labor will go seri- 
ously into the work of bringing them into 
the various organizations and lend them its 
every ounce of strength. 

W lial the Gary steel workers think of the 
"gift" from their masters, the steel barons 
may well be judged by the fact that the 
day that the eight-hour announcement was 
made with enormous headlines in the local 
papers about 10,000, most of them already 



in the organizations, assembled in a mon- 
ster mass meeting and cheered to the echo 
every mention of the American Federation 
of Labor and trades unionism in general, 
and nearly 1500 of them enrolled at the 
meeting. As this communication leaves 
this office, a half dozen clerks have been 
working all day in the headquarters at 
Gary signing up the steel workers employed 
on the night shifts. About the same thing 
is going on in Joliet and the other steel 
towns in the Chicago District. 

Now is the time for organized labor to 
get behind the steel workers in their ef- 
forts to organize. They are faced by the 
strongest and most ruthless foe in the 
world's field of industry. A foe who, to 
crush them, would violate every law of God 
and man and, if necessary, would give them 
an ephemeral concession. If the steel 
workers win out it will be the greatest 
thing that ever came to working men since 
the day the first two workers struck hands 
and said, "Let's unite and demand better 
conditions." It will mark an epoch in the 
history of labor. Now is the time for the 
American Federation of Labor and its af- 
filiated organizations to show what they 
are made of and to meet with renewed 
energy this latest tactic of the steel cor- 
poration to keep its men unorganized. 

Fraternally yours, 

Wm. Z. Foster, Secretary-Treasurer, 
National Committee for Organizing Iron 

and Steel Workers. Room 708, 166 W. 

AA^ashington Street, Chicago, 111. 



THE ELOQUENCE OF SILENCE. 

(By Chester M. Wright.) 



There is no eloquence more forceful than 
the eloquence of absolute silence. 

Nothing in all of France drove home to 
us, as we went from seaport to battlefront, 
told the story of France as the graves of 
France told it to us. 

Not all of the wondrous orators of 
France could tell a story as vivid or as im- 
pressive as the story told by the scattered 
graves of those who have died to save the 
institutions of freedom. 

You start from Paris for the front, think- 
ing more of what you have left -behind than 
of what lies ahead. 

You come soon to the line at which in 
1914 the Germans were stopped in their 
drive on Paris. And then you begin to 
think of what lies ahead, for you are on 
ground that has been fought over — ground 
on which the price of liberty has been 
paid. 

The graves of dead men always are 
where battles have been fought. And here 
arc the graves of dead men — little groups 
of graves here and there, always on some 
gently sloping hill. And as long as you 
follow the line of battle you find it marked 
by graves. 

In one group there will be but a dozen 
mounds, in another fifty, in another a hun- 
dred or more. And over each a simple 
wooden cross bearing the rosette of France 
for her fallen sons. 

No shaft of marble could be as im- 
pressive as the simple wooden cross, rough 
Iv made, sometimes standing at an angle, 
over the silent mounds. No costl) vault 
could half so eloquently bear testimony to 
the worth of human character. 

Jus1 crude heaps of earth, hen and there 
surmounted with a bit of growing green, 



or a struggling flower, always bearing the 
unpainted cross; just eternal silence. 

And we passed many of these resting- 
places. We passed them always in silence, 
in poor tribute to those who had performed 
the ultimate in service to the common 
cause. 

There seemed to come from these graves 
the very spirit of Liberty's cause. There 
was about them the dignified humility of 
democracy and faith in humanity. 

It seemed beautiful and natural, too, that 
these graves should be as they were — it 
was rest everlasting after the ultimate of 
effort. 

No graves of autocracy could be as these 
graves were. No tombs could be so placid 
under tyranny. No rough hillsides could be 
so dignified under the iron heel. 

Here, in these wind-swept graves on the 
serene hillsides of France, lie men who 
gave gladly of life itself for the security and 
freedom of mankind. It was over such 
hallowed mounds that Lincoln spoke at 
Gettysburg. It was such humble graves 
that glorified Lexington and Concord. 

But out of the humility of these last 
resting places humanity will make a shrine 
of liberty at which men and women for 
all time will bow in reverence and from 
which they will draw deep inspiration in 
the ages and ages to come. 

— .i 

Labor's Economic Platform 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of -injunction process in labor dis- 
putes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight 
hours per day on all Federal, State or municipal 
work, and not less than the prevailing per diem 
wage rate of the class of employment in the 
vicinity where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man-suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or 
compartments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain. 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



Trial by jury shall be established. 
The American trade unionists proposed 
.1 world labor congress at the same time 

and place as the peace conference and also 
direel official representation of workers in 
the official delegations of each of the bel- 
ligerent- formulating the peace treaty. 

Porto Rico Protests Are Getting Results. 

A long editorial in the San Juan, Porto 
Rico, Times, indicates that the agitation 
by trade unionists in Porto Rico and the 
United States against social conditions in 
this island is proving effective. 

A commission to he appointed by Presi- 
dent Wilson to come to Porto Rico has 
evidently convinced the Times that the old 
order has passed and now it acknowledges 
that many things trade unionists protested 
against are true. 

Labor's protest against the un-American 
Governor Y eager are indorsed by the Times 
in these words: 

"They (the commission) may find that he 
is not much of a war governor, that his 
bureaucratic schemes are inconsistent with 
the genius of the American government; 
that his Americanism is weak, when and 
where it ought to be strong; in short, that 
he is a good, honest man out of place — a 
political mistake, and too old to be re- 
paired. 

"In our opinion the Governor cannot 
handle questions involving great industrial 
problems; not because he is inherently un- 
able to do so, but because it is too late in 
life for him to learn a new trade. So the 
commission will find the labor-industrial 
problem just where it has been for two 
or three aggressive years on both sides.'' 

The above would indicate that the sugar 
and tobacco interests and other large em- 
ployers would be willing to make Governor 
Yeager the scapegoat for debasing condi- 
tions they have forced on the workers of 
this island. 

Another interesting portion of the edi- 
torial is its condemnation of Santiago Igle- 
sias, President of the Free Federation of 
Porto Rico Workingmen. Iglesias is also 
a member of the Porto Rico Senate and 
through his persistence attention has been 
called to deplorable conditions here. Xow 
the Times is ungracious enough to say that 
[glesias endangered life and property. 



Army Officers Accept Trade Union Theory. 

The Ordnance Department of the War 
Department announces that "it has been 
found that where living conditions are bad 
and housing arrangements inadequate, ord- 
nance production lags." 

The ( >rdnanee Department supplies Gen- 
eral Pershing with ammunition and its in- 
vestigators have found conditions that must 
be removed before workers can produce 
their best. These hard-headed army officers 
now accept organized labor's theory, which 
has long been resisted by employers. 

Tn several Alabama towns the "prominent 
citizens" are enthusiastic over their discov- 
ery and are giving every aid to the Ord- 
nance Department to make these places 
livable. 

A public market has been established for 
the towns of Tuscumbia, Sheffield and Flor- 
ence, where farmers dispose of their pro- 
duce to representatives of government 



plants. Government wagons cart the prod- 
uce to these factories, where it is sold to 
the workers at cost. Central bureaus for 
the three towns have tackled the housing 
problem and parks and playgrounds arc 
being planned. 

Army officers report that an investiga- 
tion of the large labor turnover in another 
town showed that sewers in the over- 
crowded residence sections were back fill- 
ing into private cellars because of inade- 
quate pumping facilities. It remained for 
the Ordnance Department's representatives 
to show war munitions manufacturers that 
if the town's finances would not permit of 
the purchase of a new pump, that it would 
be good business for them to stop their 
costly labor turnover by installing the pump 
themselves. The manufacturers accepted 
the hint. 



Altoona Then and Now. 

The Altoona, Pa., Times compares this 
year's Labor Day with those before Gov- 
ernment controlled railroads when most 
of the employees of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road were non-union. 

"They were non-union," says the Times, 
"not because they did not believe in the 
efficiency of the union organization, but be- 
cause the officials of the corporation ob- 
jected to them organizing. 

"Every effort of organizers to invade the 
city was frustrated. It was tacitly but gen- 
erally understood without the formality of 
written notice that the employee who dared 
sign the application blank of a union or- 
ganizer would forthwith lose his position 
with the Pennsylvania Railroad. This im- 
plied threat was actually carried out, al- 
though in the guise of indefinite furlough 
or some such other sinister cause." 



Land for Soldiers on Return from France. 

"We can have a job at good pay for 
every soldier who returns from France if 
Congress will give us the financial support 
needed," said Secretary of the Interior 
Lane, who is taking advantage of every op- 
portunity to press home the need for 
utilizing the millions of acres of waste 
land in this country. 

The preparation of a program looking to 
providing farms for these soldiers has been 
assigned to A. P. Davis, director and chief 
engineer of the United States Reclamation 
Service. 

"This plan," said Mr. Lane, "has received 
the indorsement of so large a percentage 
of Congress and the press of the country 
that it appears to be a probable program; 
it certainly is a practicable one. We have 
but $200,000 now for preliminary surveys 
and reports, but this will be increased un- 
doubtedly by the incoming Congress. There 
is enough waste and undeveloped land in 
this country to give every soldier a farm, 
but of course no- such program is con- 
templated, because all would not want 
farms." 



Safety First and Bible. 
Will J. French, of the San Francisco 

Typographical Union, quotes the Bible to 
support the "safety first" movement of the 
California Industrial Accident Commission. 
of which he is a member. 

In a recent address to medical men. In- 
said : 

"The earliest reference to 'safety first' 1 
have been able to find is in chapter 22, 



verse 8, of Deuteronomy, the fifth book of 
Moses, where these words appear: AYhen 
thou buildest a new house, then thou 
shalt make a battlement for thy roof, that 
thou bring not blood upon thine house, 
if any man falls from thence' 

"The foundation of English common law 
is taken from the five books of Moses, 
from Genesis to Deuteronomy, and we can 
there read much that represents the high- 
est ideals of present-day civilization. If 
they used emery wheels in those days, I 
think we would be able to read a verse 
following the one quoted about like this: 
'When thou grindest tools on the emery 
wheel, thou shalt use a hood over the 
wheel and goggles over thine eyes, that 
thou bring not blindness upon thine house 
because of dust entering the windows of 
thy soul.' " 



Insurance Man Alarmed. 

M. I. Geary, president of the National 
Association of Insurance Commissioners, is 
alarmed at the Government's industrial 
policy. Taking over railroads, means of 
communication, etc., may be all right in 
wartime, but even then, argues Mr. Geary, 
"it is not wise to drift into untried theories 
at a time when the mind and thought of 
the people are overburdened with war." 

The prospects are most serious to the 
insurance man, who fears our country will 
jump over the restraining boundaries of 
the American Constitution and fall into 
dangers, which, he says, have menaced and 
wrecked government by the people in the 
ages gone by. 

Unfortunately Mr. Geary does not give 
a list of former nations that accepted the 
theory of "government by the people." 



PROTECTION FOR ENLISTED MEN. 
(Continued from Page 7.) 



and for its conversion under the provisions of 
the Act, without medical examination, not later 
than five years after the close of the war. In 
addition to its other advantages, therefore, this 
insurance, hacked by all the resources of the 
United States Government, enables the fighting 
man to insure his insurability, regardless of his 
physical condition after the war. 
Spirit and Purpose of Government Protection. 

These three forms of Government aid — allot- 
ments and allowances, compensation, for death 
or disability, and United States Government 
insurance — are grouped together under the War- 
Risk Insurance Act, and administered, under 
the direction of the Secretary of the Treasury, 
by the Bureau of War-Risk Insurance. _ 

This is the greatest measure of protection ever 
offered to its fighting forces by any nation in 
tin history of the world. It is not charity; it 
is in the essence of justice to the gallant men 
who have gone to the colors, and to their loved 
ones at home. It strengthens America's fight- 
ing forces as they go forth to battle; it safe- 
guards the families left behind; and by its 
broad and generous provisions it takes from 
war its chief terror — fear for the future. 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil Relief Act. 

In addition to administering the 'War-Risk 
Insurance Act. the Rureau of War-Risk Insur- 
ance is authorized to act for men in the actwe 
military service, under the provision of the 
Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil Relief Act, ap- 
proved March 8, 1918, in the matter of the 
lapsing or forfeiture of certain specified life 
insurance contracts, either in life insurance 
companies or fraternal orders or organizations. 

If the Government guarantees to the insur- 
ance company or organization the payment of 
premiums, the policy will remain in force, and 
the man in-service will have one year after the 
end of military service in which to pay any de- 
limited premiums, before the policy or member- 
ship lapses. 

The benefits of the Soldiers' and Sailors' 
Civil Relief \et are available only upon ap- 
plication. The act applies only to persons in 
the service from March 8, 1918 (the date of 
the approval of the act), and to persons enter- 
ing active service after that date, from such 
date of entry. 

The insurance under the Soldiers' and Sailors' 
Civil Relief Act does not apply to Government 
insurance issued by the Bureau of War Risk 
Insurance. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



STEADY WORK ESSENTIAL. 



F. T. Hawlcy, Director of the Industrial 
Plants Division, is sending the following 
letter to all central labor bodies and unions 
whose members are engaged on Govern- 
ment contracts : 

"Would you call to the attention of your 
members, and particularly those engaged 
on Government work, the absolute neces- 
sity of being constantly on the job? 

"I ask you to impress them with the 
urgency of working the established full 
working week and the full working day 
of their various trades. 

"Every minute's time of every man is 
precious. 

"The working people of our nation are 
confronted with the grave responsibility of 
reinforcing the boys at the front. 

"We must keep our soldiers supplied 

with guns, ammunition, food and clothing. 

"And we must build the ships and keep 

them moving to transport the troops and 

the needs of our allies. 

"The world looks to the people of the 
United States for victory over an un- 
scrupulous enemy, over a dying order. 

"We have conquered every other ob- 
stacle that has thus far barred our way. 
and we shall continue to thrust the bar- 
riers aside. 

"All America is determined. 
"Every man and woman should be on 
the job on time, and stick to it with a 
tenacious will. 

"We must win the war by keeping that 
aim constantly in mind. 

"We are working for the triumph of 
democracy over autocracy. 

"We are working for the United States 
Government and all the noble ideals for 
which it stands. 

"We are working to save the lives of 
our gallant boys in the service by keeping 
them supplied with a tremendous surplus 
of the necessaries of war. 

"This is the important obligation that 
rests upon the •working people and his- 
tory shall not say it has not been ful- 
filled." 



MEASURING RIVERS. 



The quantity of water that ordinarily 
flows in a stream and the quantities that 
flow at times of flood and at times of low 
water are of vital importance to the engi- 
neer who may want to utilize the water 
for power or for irrigation or who desires 
to study the value of the stream for navi- 
gation, as well as to the man who owns 
land along the steam and who wants to 
sell his water-power rights. For this reason 
the Government, in 1888, began to measure 
the flow of streams in the United States, 
and since 1895 the bills passed by Congress 
appropriating money for the work of the 
Geological Survey have carried an item for 
"gaging streams." 

The results of this stream-gaging work 
in the drainage basins of the country are 
issued yearly in water-supply papers pub- 
lished by the United States Geological 
Survey, Department of the Interior. From 
these papers the engineer may ascertain 
not only the volume of the stream and its 
fluctuations during the year and from year 
to year, but also its mean and surface 
velocities, its mean depth, and the water 
power which may be developed on it. 

The results of stream gaging for the 



year 1916 in the lower Mississippi River 
basin, including tributaries of Arkansas 
and Red Rivers, are given in Water-Supply 
Paper 437, just issued by the United States 
Geological Survey, Department of the In- 
terior. A similar report on the St. Law- 
rence River basin has been issue as Water- 
Supply Paper 434, and a report for 1915 
on the Missouri River basin, including the 
Marias, Milk, Yellowstone, Platte, and 
Kansas Rivers and their tributaries, as 
Water-Supply Paper 406. 

These reports include descriptions of 
the stations at which the measurements 
were made and tables giving the daily and 
monthly discharge of the streams. An ap- 
pendix contains lists showing the gaging 
stations maintained in the area covered 
and the publications relating to their water 
resources. 

Water-Supply Papers 406, 434, and 437 
may be obtained on application to the Di- 
rector, United States Geological Survey, 
Washington, D. C. 



WHAT IS A DERELICT? 



The question, "When is a derelict not a 
derelict?" as settled by the House of Lords, 
has not given universal satisfaction, says 
Syren & Shipping. Certainly the judgment 
is not one which can be expected to fit every 
case, and the varying problems involved in 
each set of circumstances will ever present 
new points of interest to the legal mind. In 
the case under discussion the ship in question 
was the "Jupiter." Timber-laden and on a 
voyage from Archangel to Hull, she was at- 
tacked off the Firth of Forth by a German 
submarine. The crew were ordered — i. e., 
compelled — to leave the ship. The Germans 
boarded her and placed a bomb or bombs on 
board, and the master of the "Jupiter" averred 
that he heard an explosion which led him to 
believe that his ship had been blown up. 
The crew were subsequently picked up by a 
trawler and taken to Aberdeen, and the mas- 
ter wired to the owners that the ship had 
been sunk, and' they in their turn informed 
the charterers, H. Newsum, Sons & Co. 

What really happened was that the vessel 
floated on her cargo and was picked up by 
a patrol flotilla. She was brought into New- 
haven, near Leith, and placed in the hands 
of the Receiver of Wrecks. The lower courts 
decided that the contract of affreightment was 
at an end, and that as the cargo owners had 
exercised the right to take possession, they 
were entitled to delivery at Leith without 
payment of freight. By four to one, how- 
ever, the House of Lords decided in favor of 
the owners, and gave judgment in their favor 
for £14,050. 

The Lord Chancellor said that the physical 
act of leaving the vessel was only one feature 
in such a case. Another and essential feature, 
in order to make the vessel derelict, was the 
state of mind of the captain and crew when 
they left. That question was decisive, and the 
facts seemed to him to show clearly that the 
abandonment of the ship was not, in the cir- 
cumstances, such as to make the vessel a 
derelict. 



The need of the moment is not so much 
for the formation of new unions as for 
new members in those unions already 
formed. 



\s a preventive of strikes nothing lias 
vet been discovered which exceeds in potency 
the union label. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Page 5.) 
LAKE DISTRICT— (Continued). 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

Branches: 

CLEVELAND, O H85 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, 111 4 E. Austin Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 151 R ee d Street 

DETROIT, Mich 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, Wis 309 Tower Avenue 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

TOLEDO, Ohio g21 Summit Streel 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 35 West Eagle Street, 

Telephone Seneca 896. 

J. M. SECOND, Secretary. 

Branches: 

CHICAGO, 111 406 N. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND, Ohio 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio 85 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, Ofelo 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, Ohio 821 Summit Street 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. T 152 Main Street 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 
Marine Hospitals: 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 



Relief 
Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. T. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 
Erie, Pa. 
Menominee, Mich. 



Stations: 
Ogdensburg, N. T. 
Oswego, N. T. 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 59 Clay Street 

Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C 1424 Government Street 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 1366 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 North 30th Street 

SEATTLE, Wash.. 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 65 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box « 

PORTLAND, Ore 88% 3rd Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 68 Commercial Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 64 Pike St. Viaduct, P. O. Box 876 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal.. 613 Beacon Street, P. O. Box 674 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 

PORTLAND, Ore 98 Second Street N 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 64 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 42 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 131 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC. 

Headquarters. 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada P. O. Box 968 

KETCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
AKTerUA. Ore v P. O. Box 11$ 



12 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




SEATTLE, WASH. 



Office Phone Elliott 1196 



Established 1890 



Nearly 100 colored railroad helpers 
and laborers employed on the South- 
ern Pacific at Algiers, La., have or- 
ganized and affiliated with the 
American Federation of Labor. 

Nearly 200 New Orleans drug 
clerks have signed the charter roll 
of the first Drug Clerks' Union. 
These workers are determined to 
reduce their long work day and 
secure a living wage. They have 
affiliated with the Clerks' Interna- 
tional Protective Associaton. 

Reports received from the United 
States Employment Service show 
that women have engaged in rail- 
road tank painting, hardware-indus- 
try processes, garage management, 
and ranch work, as well as many 
other industries untried by them be- 
fore the war. Processes in hard- 
ware industries include the work of 
screw-machine hands, spot welders, 
gas welders, dip braziers, and drill 
press and bench work. Among oth- 
er new occupations to which they 
have been called are: Baggage 
porters, ushers, aircraft assemblers, 
telegraph operators, photographers, 
and bond salesmen. 

Organized street car men have 
won their strike against the Middle- 
sex & Boston Street Railway. An 
arbitrator says that "the company is 
running at a loss, but that the 
wages of the men must be fixed, 
notwithstanding that fact, because 
there is no question in my mind, 
and none were raised before me, 
of the increased cost of living." 
New rates for motormen and con- 
ductors arc 35 cents an hour for 
the first year, 37 cents for the 
second year, 39 cents for the third 
year, 41 cents for the fourth year 
and 42 cents for the fifth year. 
( Hhcr employes are advanced and 
the award ^s retroactive dating back 
to July 1. 

The second annual convention of 
the National Federation of Federal 
Employes, recently held at Chicago, 
was an enthusiastic event. Old of- 
ficers were re-elected and a big pro- 
gram for the ensuing year was 
adopted. Old age, health and un- 
employed insurance were favored, as 
was minimum wage legislation. The 
employment of child labor was con- 
demned, and taxes on incomes, in- 
heritance and excess profits were 
favored. The convention gave hearty 
indorsement to Secretary of the In- 
terior Lane's plan to reclaim land 
for soldiers' homesteads, and urged 
that this proposal be aided by a 
heavy tax on unused land, which 
would force it on the market. 

The "Painter and Decorator" con- 
gratulates scenic artists in New York 
theaters who organized and in one 
month raised wages to a $42 weekly 
minimum and secured agreements 
with theatrical managers. "These 
visible, material and substantial bene- 
fits," says Editor Skemp, "more than 
compensate the scenic artists for the 
loss of dignity they feared might 
follow their becoming a part of the 
trade-union movement and being as- 
sociated with men who are not 
ashamed to fresco a barn roof or to 
camouflage a tight board fence, pro- 
vided they receive the union scale 
and are not asked to work more 
than union hours. We congratulate 
the scenic artists. They are now in 
a position to present to the manage- 
ment of the house or studio con- 
vincing arguments in support of their 
demands for a proper recognition of 
their skill and labor." 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-Date Methods In Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

COMPASSES ADJUSTED 

500-1 SECURITIES BLDG. Next to U. S. Steamship Inspectors' Office 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



San Pedro Letter List 



Andrescn. Hans 
Aalto, Harry 
Anderson, Sven 

■i, Hans 
Blecha, Alf 
Bergh, Borge 
Clay, Henry 
Collins, Ed. 
Eklund, Svven 
Ellingson, Billy 
Folvit,', Ludvig 
Erosberg, Leonard 

ii, G. 
Frost, Peter 
Gundersen, Fred 
Grassen, Joe 

iK, Martin 
Gunerud, Thorvald 
Goffle, I>e Wm. 
I Inlmstrom, Fritz 

Holmstrom, Hjalmar Peterson, Hugo 
Hansen, Adolph Paterson, C. V. 

Hakanson, Axel Pelz, Fritz 

Hoek, A. Petrow, Fred 

Kakanson, Axel Petersen, Aage 

Hammarquist, Gust Quinn, Wm. 
Hausman, Charles Raaum, Harry 
Hoel, Jack 
Halvorsen, Harry 
Hanson. Aug. -1134 
Irmy, Fred 
Johnson, Ole 
Johnson, Chas. A. 

-2044 
Tonassen, Johannes 
Jacobsen, Telegram 



Kallas, M. 
Letchford, A. 
Lecherous, Bill 
Lill, Karl 
Larson, Gust. 
Lyngnes, Chris 
Louis, Jose M. 
Miller, John 
Mourice, Francis 
Monson, Chas. C 
Nordling, Frank 
Nurmi, Taini 
Norstrom, Hans 
Nelson, D. -1099 
Olsen, Ole W. 
Olsen, Andrew 
Pederson, Carl 
Pitkin, V. 
Peterson, K. B 
Pederson, John 



903 



\V. 



Rytko, Otto 
Kusmussen, J. 
Shlieman, F. 
Stringer, E. 
Seppel, P. 
Solvin, O. E. 
Steen, Ivar 
Suni, A. 
Salo, Oscar 



Johansen, Fred Terkki, Arthur 

Johansson, A. -1874 Thornlund, John N. 
Johansen, C. Williams, Edward A 

Jensen, Just. II. Warkala, John 
Kofi, Michael Yeoman, W. E. 

Kruger, G. Zunderer, Theo 

IMPORTANT MAIL 

QUESTIONNAIRES. 
Anderson, Jack JohnLonnquist, John 
Clifford, Arthur R. Victor 
Danful, Albert Nilson, Nils Edward 

Haggeros, Samuel Sandstrom, Oscar 
Kalnin, Edward Vestergaard, 



EUREKA, CAL. 
Mercantile Lunch 

Is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy & Haakon's 

Proprietors 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the ' 
Beauty," the "Princess" and 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 



Little 
other 



612 



C. O'CONNOR 

Fourth Street - Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER A HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIG 8TORE8 

Store No. 1 — Cor. Main and First 

Store No. 2— Westlake and Pine 

SEATTLe 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance 8ervlce 

Creamatory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH 
Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor In New York Nautical College. 
Room 4140 ARCADE BUILDING 
Third Floor, First Avenue Side 
SEATTLE, WA8H. 



H. 
Thomas 



QUESTIONNAIRES. 

Members whose questionnaires are ad- 
vertised in tliis column should, in order 
to comply with the military regulations. 
Immediately notify S. A. Silver, Sailors 
1'nion, 59 Clay Street, San Francisco, to 
forward same to the port of their des- 
tination. 



Aalta, Albert 
Aalta. Henry E. 
Abrahamson. A. W. 
Anderson. Sven 
Anker, Lars 
Axelsen, J. H. 
Baardsen. Hans M. 
Behne, William A. 



Kallasman, Edward 

J. 
Larson, Fingal 
Lolne. Frame L. 
Lorenzo, Bruno 
Ludwig, Nils H. 
Lundstrom. E. W. 
Luse, John 



Bergstrom. John E. Makla, Anden 



Bowma. Jan 
Burg, John 
Byglin, O. O. 
Carlsen. H. C. 
Carlson, Einar G. 
Castro. Julian F. 
Christiansen, Hans 

P. 
Christensen, Louis 
Eliasson, J. E. 
Ellison. Morris 
Erickson, Alf. 
Brisen, John 
Eugene, John 
Greenitz, John 



Mathiesen, Axel 
Mortenson, Adolf 
Nielson, Hans 
Nilsson, Nils H. 
Olsen, Nicolai 
Olsen, Claio 
Olsen, Mandlus 
Olsen, Angar M. 
Olsen, Ragnar 
Olson, Knut 
Ostergard, Frank 
Pederson, C. E. 
Peterson, Conrad 
Pettersen, Einar E. 
Rasmussen, R. H. 



A GOOD CUp"o-F COFFEE 



— or — 



A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



Sailors' Outfitter 
BENJAMIN'S 

The Old Reliable 

CLOTHING. SHOES. HATS, RUBBER 

AND OIL CLOTHING 

207 Second Street Eureka, Cal. 

E. BENJAMIN, Prop. 



Cigars and Tobaccos 

Periodicals 
F. W. MOGENSEN 

217 E STREET EUREKA, CAL. 



Grondahl, Armas W. Rasmussen, L. A. 
Gumdeross, Hans C. Renwal, Ansclm 
Hansen, Johannsen Rod, Sakarias 
Hansen, B. P. A. Roed, Hjalmar 
Hansen, Hans M. Rofter, Jack 
Hendrikson, Nick Rontved, O. J. 
Henrikson, Henry Schlppman, H. C. 
Hermann. Carl E. Sige, Herman 
Impinen, Frank F. Stovner, Anders S. 
Jaeobson, Alexander Strasdin, Paul 



R. 
Jansson, 
Jansen, 
Jensen, 
Jensen, 



Karl H. 
Bernh. 
Frank 
Henry 



Tohnsen. Carl 
Knoop, Jan 



G. 



Tanum. Helga 
Van Keppel, Jo- 
Wall. Alfred 
Wamser, Christian 
Wllcke, J. W. G. 
Wilhelmson. John 
Zwart. A. 



Tacoma Letter List. 



Carlstrand, Gustaf 
Hoffman, Fred 
Holmstrom, Cart 
Houge, Anton 
Kalberg, Wm. 
Krane, I. T. 
I, arson, Alexander 
Magill, Michel 

son, E. W. 
Martinsson, E. 



Meyer, Karl 
Nielsen, Niels -75 
Olsen, Emil 
Palken, G. 
Bertelsen, Bertel 
Pettersson, -1287 
Revheim, Oscar 
Seyfried. M. -2962 
Swansen, Cart 



Olof Nilsson, born in Hufvulsvik, 
Jamtland, Sweden, year 1880, height 
5 ft. 8 in., brown eyes, dark brown 
hair; last heard from in 1909, on 
board S. S. "Kurrachee," Karrachi, 
India. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify his sister, Mrs. 
Nels Olson, 1033^< W. First St., Du- 
luth, Minn. 8-21-18-Adv. 

The men hereinafter named arc 
requested to call personally or com- 
municate with J. T. Smith, 112 Mar- 
ket St., San Francisco, Cal. Chas. 
Frascr, W. Holmes, Otto Kanka, 
Karl Olsen. William B. Fierce, 
Thomas Wolstenholme. 10-2-18-Adv. 



DRUGS, KODAKS, 

STATIONERY 
The REXALL Store 



ATKINSON <£. 
STREET, Cor. 2d, 



WOODS 
EUREKA, 



CAL. 



'When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention The Sea- 
men's Journal. 



Aberdeen, Wash , Letter List 



Anderson, Peter 
Albers, Geo. 
Browen, Alexander 
Braun, Alex. 
Bjerk, G. T. 
Bruhn, Chas. 
Brim, Mattla 
Brant, Max 
Barrot, G. 
Brandt. H. 
Bengtson, S. 
Davis, John 
Eliassen, H. C. 
Flohten, James 
Frohne, Robert 
Hedrlck. Jack 
High, Edward 
Helander, J. F. 
Heyn, Th. 
Jansson, John 
Jansson, J. A. 
Johanssen, John F 
Johnsen, Hans 
Johnson, Hilmar 
Kallas, Augers 
Khamp, S. 



KanKaanpaa, J. E. 
Lampe, Fred 
Lehtoncn, A. 
Markman, H. 
Malkoff. Peter 
Melners, Herman 
Magnusson. Charles 
Newman, I. 
Olsen, A. 
Olson, W. 
Olsen, Alf 
Olsen, Ferdenan 
Petersen, Harry 
Pedersen, Alf. 
Rahlf, J. 
Risenius, Sven 
Rosenblad, Otto 
Swanson, G. 
Svenson, Gustaf 
Torin, Gustaf A. 
Thompson, Alex. 
Valfors, Arvid 
Wendt, W. 
Williams, T. C. 
Zimera, Geo. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 



103-107 First 
Near Yesler Way 



Avenue South 

SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

118-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 
ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING. HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN, Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders Taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

320-322 So. F St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



Phone 2*3 

"Ole and Charley" 

"The Royal" 
"The Sailors' Rest" 

Cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
219 EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



HARRY W. LEVY 

CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS 
Union Made Goods, Hats, Shoes, 

Trunks and Suitcases 

Fishermen's and Sailors' Supplies 

(OLD TOWN) Tacoma, Wash. 

Main 8S9S 



SMOKERS 



Se« that this label (in light blue) appears on the 
box in which you are served. 



Issued by Authority oi the Cigar Makers 

Union-made Cigars 

■*S5V 3htf Grrtiftrt. iwtwc^n «mm* ««« b» «... *•• «*» *" "P'^Jt—t 

^ \^\ .ufuw.ru Twf Sr.,«y,i!K'iNUD.iTiniUi UNIOHd Am'iU. J1 OTHM1IM. devotM tvn>t »a ; 



jnmo:«o( i« biw wmomkuiiiutiohai uwokoi »«•'«», 
i imuuciiku wuiMi or tki 

ut tin narM 

' All Wiagtatiu up* Vu Litai mi be puniMil taat^f l» Iw. 



V CM I t/t/A 



itSBW9WfcW*/>*** 'S«* ■■<*<■ i*-J!M, 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



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Home News 



DD 



Prince Axel of Denmark, com- 
mander of the Danish navy and head 
of a mission invited to this country 
to study the American naval organ- 
ization, was received by President 
Wilson. The Prince went to the 
White House with Secretary Lansing. 

Clear profits of $3,762,491 for the 
year ended June 30 is reported by 
the General Petroleum Corporation 
and the General Pipe Line Company 
of California. These profits are an 
increase of $2,343,667 over the prev- 
ious year. Before announcing this 
year's profits most substantial sums 
were set aside for depreciation and 
exhaustion of oil lands. 

An Army of 4,800,000 by next July, 
after all deductions have been made 
for casualties and rejections, is what 
the enlarged American military pro- 
gram calls for. General March ex- 
plained this to the House Appropria- 
tions Committee in discussing the 
new $7,000,000,000 Army estimates. 
There are now about 3,200,000 men 
under arms, General March said, and 
the plan is to call 2,700,000 of the 
new draft registrants to the colors 
between now and July. 

Steps to mobilize negro workers 
for agricultural and war munitions 
work are being taken by Dr. George 
E. Haynes, director of negro econo- 
mies for the Department of Labor. 
Conferences with representative 
negroes in a number of States is 
resulting in the creation of State 
advisory committees. In addition to 
these committees, Federal supervis- 
ors of negro economies have been 
named for Ohio, Virginia, Illinois, 
Mississippi, Georgia and Florida. 

The War Industries Board has no- 
tified the Board of Education of 
New York City that only where there 
is the utmost need shall a new 
school be built while the war emer- 
gency continues. The War Indus- 
tries Board will not give the edu- 
cators priority for steel and other 
material because every ounce of en- 
ergy and material is needed in the 
war. The board also points out 
that Secretary of the Treasury Mc- 
Adoo has ruled that new public 
buildings are not necessary while 
the war lasts. 

Anthracite coal production during 
the week ended August 31 totaled 
1,806,121 gross tons, the record for 
any week in 1918. The increase over 
the preceding week amounted to 
100,000 tons, and over the corre- 
sponding week of 1917 214,369 tons. 
These figures do not include coal 
used at the mines or sold for local 
delivery. Of the total output, 1,202,- 
812 tons was of prepared and pea 
sizes, and 603,309 of steam sizes. 
The average daily output totaled 
301,019 tons, this being the first 
week this year which the daily aver- 
age went above the 300,000-ton mark. 

Wages of railroad employees can- 
not be garnished as this process 
would attacli money under Federal 
control, rules Director General of 
Railroads McAdoo, who orders thai 
hereafter "no moneys or other prop- 
erty under Federal control or de- 
rived from the operation of car- 
riers while under Federal control 
shall be subject to garnishment, at- 
tachment or like process in the 
hands of such carriers, or any or 
them, or in the bands of any em- 
ployee mi officer of the United States 
Railroad Administration." The Di- 
rectOr General also says that "if 
any rules or regulations become ncc- 
essary to require employees to pro- 
vide for their just debts, the same 
will be issued hereafter." 



14 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




The Bureau of Yards and Docks, 
Navy Department, is asking bids on 
additions to the machine shops and 
Foundry at the Roston Navy Yard, to 
cost $900,000. 

]>anisli and American shipping 
agreement, which has been the sub- 
of negotiations between the War 
Trade Board and the special Danish 
mission in Washington, has been 
completed and signed. Similar agree- 
ments have been made with all Euro- 
pean neutrals, except Holland. 

Contracts let for white pine 
August 28, by the Navy Department 
totaled approximately $800,000. Nine 
firms shared the awards, the Wyatt 
Prock Co. of Philadelphia, leading 
with eleven contracts, amounting to 
about $650,000. The majority of the 
lumber is to be delivered at Bos- 
ton, but New York, South Brooklyn, 
Washington, Philadelphia and Nor- 
folk are also included in the list. 

Purchase by the Railroad Admin- 
istration of nine barges, two tow- 
boats and warehouse facilities at East 
St. Louis belonging to the Kansas 
City, Mo., River Navigation Co., and 
operation of the barges and boats on 
the lower Mississippi, has been ap- 
proved by Director-General McAdoo. 
This transaction was authorized in 
order to provide further equipment 
for the transportation line operated 
by the Railroad Administration from 
St. Louis to New Orleans on the 
Mississippi River. 

So many tugboats were taken from 
the Great Lakes last year for service 
on t he Atlantic coast of the United 
States that it appears there is a 
shortage of this craft on the Lakes, 
and shipping operators there arc 
now purchasing tugs along the New 
England coast to help out the situa- 
tion. The latest sale reported is that 
of tug "John Chester Morrison," of 
Rockland. Me., and she is to be 
taken around by Capt. George Web- 
ster, who will call at Halifax for a 
pilot to the River St. Lawrence. 

By a decree just issued, neutral 
vessels operating under safe conduct 
issued by an enemy country will not 
be recognized by the Allies, and 
both vessel and its cargo are liable 
to seizure. The decree stipulates 
that any neutral vessel which places 
itself under enemy control by receiv- 
ing an enemy safe conduct, which 
is not recognized by the Allies and 
is in opposition to the exercise of 
their belligerent rights, will be con- 
sidered, unless proof to the contrary 
is furnished, that it is navigating in 
enemy interests and therefore be 
subject to capture and confiscation, 
together with the merchandise or 
enemy property constituting the cargo. 

Alleging that the British steam- 
ship "Glenorchy" was severely dam- 
aged and her nun platform smashed 
by being run down by the steamship 
"Paul II. Harwood," Captain D. G. 
Durrant, commander of the "Glenor- 
chy," has filed libel proceedings with 
Clerk Kelsey of the Norfolk Bureau 
of the United States Court, asking 
for alleged damages amounting to 
$20,000. In the petition Captain Dur- 
rant recites that his ship was secure- 
ly anchored in Hampton Roads, a 
mile from Old Point r - August 27, 
n the "Harwood." in endeavor- 
ing to pass her, swung in too close 
to the "Glenorchy," smashing her 
starboard bulwarks and wrecking the 
gun platform on deck. Captain Dur- 
rant alleges that the "Glenorchy" was 
damaged $10,000 and that delays in 
being repaired will bring the total 
damages to $20,000. 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 29th, 1918 

Assets $59,397,625.20 

Deposits 55,775,507.86 

Reserve and Contingent Funds ------ 2,286,030.34 

Employees' Pension Fund - 284,897.17 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK, President 

GEO. TOURNV, Vice-Pies, and Mgr. A. II. R. SCHMIDT, Vice-Pies, and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE, Vice-President 

WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier 

A. H. MULLER, Secretary 
WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary 
GOODFELLOW, EELS, MOOKE & ORRICK, 
General Attorneys 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
JOHN A. BUCK A. H. R. SCHMIDT A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY I. N. WALTER E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. T. KRUSE HUGH GOODFELLOW ROBERT DOLLAR 



San Francisco Letter List 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from the date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
S. A. Silver, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



Abrahamson, Axel 
Ackerman, Valfred 
Acosta, Miguel 
Adolfsson, John 
Aherlund, Ernst 
Aluwe, Jo* 
Andersen, A. F. C. 
Andersen, Frank 
Andersen, H. -2127 
Andersen, John 
Andersen, M. -2054 
Andersen, Nils F. 
Andersen, Rasmus 
Anderson, Alfred N. 
Anderson, Andrew 
Anderson, Albert 
Anderson, Carl J. 
Anderson, C. N. 

Baali, M. 
Babchuck, Ernest 
Backman, A. -2066 
Bahn. C. F. 
Barry, Dick 
Beckly, Christ 
Benrowitz, Felix 
Bergesen. Berger 
Berg, Sigfrid 
Berner, Albert 
Bernstein, Hans 
Bertelson, Oscar 
BiHington, M. 
Binder, Herbert 
Biron, E. 
Bjork, Martin C. 
Birhnes, Ole A. 

Cadem, Ludvlg 
Calem, Anthony 
Call. Fred 
Carlsen, Albln 
Carlsen, Severln 
Carlson, C. A. 
Carlson, Carl 



Carlson, Seth 
Carlson, Warner 
Carlson, C. S. 
Carsten, A. 
Cashln, J. B. 
Cassberg, K. G. A. 
Chllberg, Benjamin 

Dahlgren, W. A. 
Dalhstrom, Arthur 

H. 
Dahlstrom, Ernst 
Dahlstrom, G. M. 
Daniels. L. M. 
Davcy, Chas. 
Davidson. Waldemar 
De Moss, E. 
Delong, K. 
Edvarse, Frits 
Ek, Chas. 
Ekelund, Rich. 
Eliassen, Adolf E. 
Ellwes, Fred 
Engel. Paul 
Engellen, D. A- 
Engstrom, Ben. 
Erickson, Aksel 
Erickson. Erik 
Erickson, George 
Fagerlie, Odell 
Fesehlo, Paul 
Ficht, Arthur 
Finck, John 
Fisher, G. A. 
Fjcllman, George 
Flansburg, Ira 
Flem, Knut 
Fraser, Alexander V 
Garcia, Jose 
Garfield, G. 
Gonzales, Francisco 
Grant, August 
Grant, Lewis 
Gray, Hamilton 
Green, Laurence 
Gregg, Harry B. 
Groth. Charles 

Halvorsen, Henry 
Hamm, R. 
Hamren, T. 
Hannus, Peter 
Hansen, Charles 
Hansen. Chris. 
Hansen, Hans 
Hansen. Harry 
Hansen, Jargon 
Hansen, Johannes 
Hansen, Oscar 
Hansen, Ranevald 
Hansen, R. E. 
Hanson, Arthur 
Hanson, Karl J. 
Hanson, Edward 
Hauth. Carl 
Hawkins. C. A. 
Hay, C. W. 
Hazen. J. S. 
Hein. M. 
Heldal, Trygoe h. 



Anderson, F. V. 
Anderson, J. -1 
Anderson, John C. 
Anderson, Oskar L. 
Andersson, A. T. 
Andersson, C. J. 
Andersson, Brick 
Andersson, Gottfried 
Andersson, Sture 
Andreas, Johannes 
Antonsen, Marius 
Ask, Alfred E. 
Ask, Lorentz 
Auckland, Gus 
Augustine. Anthony 
Axelsen, H. 
Azarov, Daniel 

Blair, Francis 
Bllxt, Gus 
Blomgren, Carl A. 
Blomgren, Fred 
Blomgren, M. A. 
Blomkvlst, Albert 
Borgen, Arne 
Borgasen, Oscar 
Borjesen, L. 
Bos, Johannes 
Bower, Claude S. 
Brevick, Johan 
Brian, Jos. 
Brown. George \V. 
Brunwald, Harry 
Bye, Alf 
Bye, Krlstian 

Christensen, C. 
Christensen. Harry 
Christensen, Oskar 
Christensen, Otto 
Christensen, Victor 
Christoffersen. C. 
Christofferson, 

Gunval 
Clausen, Louis 
Crosiglio, Joseph 
Cole, C. 
Conolly, Obert 
Corson, Geo. 



Dew Pree, Earl 
Dias. E. 

Didrlckson, Martin 
Dobbin, Harry 
Dolan, C. 
Donk, Johan 
Dunwoody, Geo. 
Duncan. W. J. 
1 >yer, John 

Erickson, L. 
Erickson, Nils 
Krikson, Chas. 
Ernest, Edward 
Esterberg, Gust. 
Ettrup, Jens 
Eucsen, Sigurd 
Evensen, J. L. 
Evpraen. Petter 
Ewin, Arthur H. 

Fraser, James 
Frederick, Lue 
Fredrickson, Martin 
Fredriksen, B. D. 
I- r. idland, Carl J. 
Fritz, Henry 
Frost, Konge 
Frost, Peter 

Gulbranson, B. 
Gulfeldt, A. 
Gundersen. Christ 
Gusgron, Joseph 
Gustafson, G. B. 
Gustavsen, Anton 
Gussum, Joe 
Guthrie, R. 

Henderson, Robert 
Henensen, A. 
Henriksen, C. 
Hentschel, O. J. 
Hess, Arthur 
I Hides. W. 
Hill -1387 

Hill, 2030 

I lobbs, Frank 
Hofman, P. 
Hogstrom. Harry 
Holmes, Fred 
Holmgren, H. 
Holmstrom, Carl A. 
Holmstrom. D. B. 
Holt. Fredrick S. 
Hood. Chas. S. 
Hubbert. John L. 
Hnntpr. John La** 
Hylander, Gustaf 
Hyskcll, Thomas F. 



Isakson, John A. 

Jakobsen, Joakim 
Jansson, Frcdrik 
Jensen, Anton 
Jensen, Henry 
Jensen, Lorentz 
Jewett, Charles 
Johannesen, Anthon 
Johannesen, Johan 
Johansen, Asmus 
Johansen, Chas. J. 
Johansen, Fritz 
Johansen, John 
Johanson, Robert 
Johnsen, G. 
Johansson, Bernard 

Kaktin, Ed. 
Kallberg, Arvid 
Kamp, Charles 
Karlsson, Johan 

!l. Will. B. 

Kaskinen, A. 
Kasperson, E. 
Kinamon, Jaek 
Kirkham, George 
Knaut, Charles 
Knechtman, \V. 
Knockenhauer, H. 

Labuhu, Frank 
Larson, Alf 
Larsen, Arthur 
Larsen, Gustav B. 
Larsen, H. 
Larsen, Rang-wald 
Larsen, Theo. 
Larsen, Tonwald 
Larson, Cornelius 
Larson. L. A. 
Larsson. Ragnar 
Leinasar, Jacob 
Letchford. Alexan.lei 

Madsen, Jack 
Madsen, Tom 
Mahler, Hans 
Maki, Ivar 
Malmgren, Oskar 
Malstrom. Erlck 
Marklln, John 
Markman, Harry 
Martinsen, Nordal 
Marshall. E. R. 
Martinsen, John 
Mathiesen, Axel 
Mathlson, l>avid 
Mathusen, L. 
Matson, K. A. 
M< Donald, H. C. A. 
Mi-Gillivray. F. B. 
McLeod, Norman A 

Nannestad, A. 
Neilson, Neil 
Nelson, Charlie 
Nelson, Harold 
Nelson, N. P. 
Nelson, Rasmund 
Newman, Gustav A. 
Nielsen, Krlstian 
Nielsen, Svend G. 
Niewert. Aug. 
Nilsen, Conrad 
Nllsen, Hans L. 

Oakley, Loren D. 
Oieldt, C. 
Okesson, Erick 
Olausen, Christian 
Olgrein, Verner 
Olesen, Ingwald 
Olmstead, Harry 
Olsen, Amund 
Olsen, Ausgar 
Olsen, Charley 
Olsen, Edward 
Olsen. H. -471 

Paavllainen. A. J. 
Palhen. Geo. H. 
Palu, G. 

Panchot, Herbert 
Paulsen, Karl 
Parks, Leslie 
Parral, Olegario 
Pattenberg, John 
I'aunu, J. 
Payton. M. C. 
Pedersen, Eugene 
Pedersen, Eysten 
Pedersen, H. -1560 
Pederson, Charles 
Pedersen, Henry G. 
Pedersen, M. G. 
Pedersen, Peter B. 
Pederson. Oluf 
Pedersen, Sofus R. 
Perkins. Will 
Quickman, W. 
Quilje, Johannes 



Johansson, John 
Johnson, Anton 
Johnson, Fred 
Johnson, Hjalmar 
Johnson, John 
Johnson, Julius N. 
Johnson, Maddy 
Johnson, Norman 
Johnson, Ole 
Johnston, Leslie 
Jones, E. L. 
Jones, Fred 
Jordan, Henry 
Jcngeiisen, Robert 
Jorgenson, J. 

Knudsen, Daniel 
Koch, Gottlieb 
Koppei, John 
Korsberg, Volmar 
Kosoff, I. 
Koster, Walter 
Kratton, R. M. 
Kraut, Charles 
Kiistensen, L. P. J. 
Kristiansen, Nils 
Kruse, Chas. 
Kurgrel, Oles 

Lewis, Owen J. 
Llndblad, Conrad 
Lindros, G. J. 
Lindquist, Charley 
Lubbers, Henrlck 
Ludvigsen, P. L. 
Lund, Olai 
Lundmark, Helge 
Lundstrom, E. W. 
Ludwigsen, A. 
Lynch, James 
Lyngaard. George 
Lyon, John 

McNalr, H. S. S. 
Melander, J. K. 
Meskell, M. 
Mess, William 
Meyer. H. 
Meyer, Hans 
Miller, Einar 
Milnor, C. D. 
Mirabal, Jose 
Mlrttlnen, John E. 
Mitt. Mikke 
Moller, F. A. 
Moller. S. O. 
Mortensen, B. 
Mulley, James 
Morrison, Philip 
Moxnes, Christ 

Nilson, Hjalmar 
Nilson, Nat 
Nilsson, Hlldlng 
Nilsson, Reinholt 
Noblanc. Louis 
Nolen, Axel 
Nord, Clarence 
Nordenberg, J. 
Nordstrom, Bror 
Nurkin, H. 
Nutcher, Lyle P. 

Olsen, Hans 
Olsen, Helmer H. 
Olsen, Herman 
Olsen, Iver 
Olsen, Johan S. 
Olsen. O. -1283 
Olsen, Ole -1325 
Olsen, Peter 
Olsen, Regmar 
Olson, John 
Olson, Tommy 
Osterman. Jonn 

Peters. B. 
Petersen, Aage 
Petersen, A. -1676 
Petersen, Olav -lf.'.iE. 
Peterson, Frank G. 
Peterson, Gus 
Peterson, O. -1551 
Peterson, Robert 
Peterson, R. I . 
Petterson. Einar E. 
Pettersson, T. -1734 
Pllcher, H. J. 
Pletch, Frank 
Pokos, Wat-- Hi 
Pope. B 
Porter, J. 
Powell. H. A. 
Powell. Patrick 

Price, William B. 
Putkka, Werner 
Qulrage, Juan 
Qvanstrom, Arvid 



Uadke. Paul 
Ram, E. 
Ramstad, Andreas 

Rasmussen, Karl V. 
Rasmussen, s. 
Rasmussen, s. A. 
Relmer, i'< ter m. 
Kiisgaard, Soren 
Rlngman, Carl 
. Alfred 
Rod, Sakarias 
Roe. Berger 
SaliarolT, J. A. 
Sandblom, Konrad 
Sandstrom. O. H. 
Sounders, O. 
Sarin, Charlies 
Sarin, Wilnelm A. 
Schmidt C. 
Sherlf, John 
Simensen, Arne 
Slmos, Antonio 
Simpson, L. C. 
Sjoberg, Silas 
Smith, Geo. C. 
Smith, John T. 
Solvin, Oscar E. 
Sorensen, J. II. 
Sorensen, Jorgen 
Sorensen. O. E. 
Sorensen, L. A. 
Sorensen, S. C. 
Sorensen, Soren P. 

Talval, Alfred 
Talbert, Frank 
Tanman, Robert 
Theorin, John E. 
Thomas, Ki 
Thorn, Edmund 
Thomsen, Vilhelm 
Thor, Laurl 
Uhlen, Jack 
Van der Ocrt, W. 
Van Graff. Jan 



Roesberg. Chas. V. 
Roos. Yrjo O. 
Ronn, E. 
Rop, Albert 
Rosenberg. Adoli'li 
Rosen. Valfrld 
Ruckmlch, A. 
Ruger, Harry W. 
Rundstrom, Albert 
Runnqulst, Gust. 
Ryan, Patrick 

Sowlck, Bernard 
Spatz, K. 
Steele, Henry 
Stein. Albert W. 
Stevensen, August 
Stranberg, P. 
Strandgard, Christ 
Stromblad. Olat 
Strom, Karl O. 
Strybos, D. 
Stupurak. J. V. 
Sund. Alex 
Svanson, William 
Svendsen, Henry 
Svendsen, S 
Svensen. A. 
Svensson, John 
Sveeingsen, S. U. 
Bwensen, Anker 
Swenson, Rubin 
Swlnbauer. C. 

Thomgren, Chas. G. 
Tillman, Andrew 
Tilt. Clifford 
Tomsen, Waldemar 
Tomson, Charley 
Toutt, Walter 
Trlho, George 
Trimmer, David 

Verhof, H. 



Wachter, John Westvik, I. 
Wagner. Ralph W. Wichman. Daniel 

Wake, John Wlhavalnen, Geo. 

Wall, Alfred Wilkinson, George 

Wallenstrand. HarryWilllams, John 

Wamser. A. Williams. T. C. 

Wank, Roman A. Wilson, Williams 



Winkler, Otto 
Wlschcar, Ernest 
Woodley, Clifford R. 
Wurst, Walter 



Ward, Joe 
Welsson, Emll 
Werner, Chas. 
Wesgard, Jens 
West, I. 
York, A. J. 

Zeritt, John Zetergren, E. 

PACKAGES. 



Bertelsen, Krlstian 
Crawford, L. F. 
Bkwall, Gust A. 
Fagerberg, Ivan 
Frazer, Alex V. 
Halvorsen, Elmer 
Irmey, Fred 
Johnson, Carl 
Johnson. Ivar 
Jurgenson, Julius 
Kerr, H. J. 



Malmqulat, E. J 
Mortensen. J r 
Mourlce, Francis 
Nelson, A. -1092 
Olson. Knut 
Osterholm. John W. 
Paal, K. 
Roach, Alfred 
Smith, John T. 
Sparling, T. 
Wesgaard. Jens 



REGISTRATION CARDS. 
Allias, W. Leaf, Frank 

Andersen, Ole Mattesen, Hans 

Anderson, Jack J. Mattson, Johan II. 
Anderson, Lenus H. Oad, John 
Andreasen, Harry Olsson, Otto 
Andree, Axel E. Lund, Carl W. 
Blair, Bernard Pederson, Carl 

Dahlberg, Oscar Nordstrom, Gustaf E. 

Dewlln, Charles J. Pera, Gust 
Dougherty, Jack Peterson, Alfred 
Grussman, Alec G. Peterson, Ernest F. 
Hagburg, Gust Ratt Sven T. 

Halvorsen, Olaf Sandell, John A. 

Highland. Daniel Rogahn, Axel 
Hlnsen, Andrew L. Sandstrom, Iver 
Hoppenbrouner, Are-Soderlund, J. 

bus F. Sprague, Theo. I. 

Isakson, C. W. Trlgebretsen, T. 



Koskl, Juho 
Larson, John W. 
Laurltsen, Ole 



Van Roon, Andries 
Villa, Ola 

Welkman, William 



INFORMATION WANTED. 
Any member of the crew of "C. S. 
Holmes" who was present when Gust 
Fondahn was hurt near Cape Flat- 
tery when in tow of "Goliath" on 
the 3d of January, 1913, will please 
communicate with Attorney S. T. 
Hogevoll, 627 Pacific Building, San 
Francisco, or with F. R. Wall, Mer- 
chants Exchange Building. 

9-11-18-A.lv. 

Will Jack Ludwig and Gus Soukka, 
who were on the "Hecla" when John 
McManus was killed in Alaska, in 
1915, please call on or communicate 
with F. R. Wall, 324 Merchants' 
Exchange Building? Telephone, Sut- 
ter 5807. 7-17-18 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts of 
Thos. W. Watler, last heard from at 
New York, about Nov., 1917, please 
notify agent, Sailors' Union, Port 
Arthur, Tex. 

Gustav Barrot, late of the U. S. C. 
S. "McCulloch," will please call 
on F. R. Wall, 324 Merchants Ex- 
change Bldg., in regard to his claim 
for loss of personal effects. 



WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

JOE WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 

Exclusively 

28 EAST STREET, near Market 

Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 1619 
Repairing Done While You Walt, by the Latest Machinery 

Work Called For and Delivered 
WE USE ONLY THE: BEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 




THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 




WS.S. 



WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 

ISSUED BY THE 

UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 25, 35 and 60 cents per day, 
or $1.50, $2 to $2.50 per week, with all 
modern conveniences. Free Hot and 
Cold Shower Bath on every floor. Ele- 
vator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN. Manager 



Phone Garfield 2457 



HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 

Res., Randolph 27 
Office Hours, 9 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 



DENTIST 



No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Street* 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

(JNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Good* 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Phone Kearny 691 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 
SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 
Prices. :: :: Union Made Goods Only. 
103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Jortall 


Bros. 


Express 


Stand and Baggag 


e Room 




— at — 




212 EAST 


ST., San 


Francisco 


Phone Douglas 


6348 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN & NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



Residence, 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 

Phone Douglas 1416 San Francisco 



East Street No. 19, near Market 

TAILOR 

To the U. S. Navy 

GEO. A. PRICE 

(IS RIGHT) 

Blues— UNIFORMS— Whites 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING, ETC. 

500 Lockers Free San Francisco, Cal. 



French American 
Bank of Savings 

Saving* and Commercial 



108 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

RESOURCES, $10,000,000 

Member of Associated Savings Bank* 
of San Francisco 

United States Depository for 

Postal Savings Funds 

DIRECTORS 

J. M. Dupas 
John Glnty 
J. S. Gorteau 



G. Beleney 
J. A. Bergerot 
S. Blsslneer 
Leon Bocqueraz 
O. Bozlo 
Charlea Carpy 



Arthur Legallet 
Geo. W. McNear 
X. De Plehon 







Ask for this Label 
on Beer 



INT'L UNION OF 
UNITED BREWERY and 
SOFT DRINK WORKERS 

OF AMERICA 
Asks you to write and speak to your 



S^ssgg^ 


Union / Cjjfi(!tj| ^ 


Sod 


M3de LvTOW 


Drlnh 


and n^iSSLK? 




toil led \z£%£gg2 


Water 


rw£^ Or America JS^r 


comiMi «ti»pi wniimwi ■••• 



Ask for this Label 
on Soft Drinks 



STATE ASSEMBLYMEN AND STATE SENATORS 

TO . 

WORK AND VOTE 

Against the Ratification of the National Prohibition Amendment 
to the Constitution 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 



716 MARKET STREET— at Third and Kearny 

UNION MADE 
IN OUR OWN SHOP 

OVERCOATS 



Represented by 
E. PEGUILLAN 




SUITS AND 



to Order at Popular 
Prices 




JACOB PETERSEN & SON 
Proprietor* 

Established 18S0 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



1918 EDITION 

AUDEL'S 



NEW MARINE ENGINEERS GUIDE 

With Questions and Answers — Price, $3.00 

EDW. QUINN, Phone Prospect 354 DALT HOTEL, 34 TURK STREET 




Named Shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



The Anglo California Trust Company 

As successors to the SWEDISH-AMERICAN BANK 
offers a particularly convenient service to 

SEA FARING MEN and to the SCANDINAVIAN PEOPLE 

in California 

ANGLO-CALIFORNIA TRUST CO. 

Main Office: Northeast Cor. MARKET and SANSOME STREETS 

BRANCHES: 

16th and Mission Streets Fillmore and Geary Streets 

Third and Twentieth Streets 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $ 1,910,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 17,000,000 

COMMERCIAL SAVINGS TRUST 



New» from Abroad 



TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO ST., near Market 

Phone Douala* 4874 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

'Nuf Sed 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Members of the crew of the S. S. 
"Princeton," please take notice that 
your case will be reached for trial 
before Hon. Julius M. Mayer, at the 
United States Post Office Building, 
in the Borough of Manhattan, City 



of New York, on the 7th day of Oc- 
tober, 1918. Negotiations looking to 
settlement have not been concluded 
and we expect to try the case. Wit- 
nesses or any members of the crew 
who expect to be in this vicinity 
please telegraph me so that I may 
count on you. This irrespective ol 
whether or not your testimony has 
been taken before. Silas B. Axtell, 
One Broadway, New York City, At- 
torney for the Crew. 10-2- IX 

When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention The Sea- 
men's Journal. 



Maximilian Harden, in the Zukunft, 
contrasts the aristocratic German 
spirit with the democratic American 
spirit, and says that America is a 
storehouse of idealism such as was 
never known before. 

Although the British shipping losses 
were lower there was a slight increase 
in the total allied and neutral shipping 
losses, due to enemy action and ma- 
rine risk in August over July, accord- 
ing- to a statement by the admiralty 
just issued. The total losses for Au- 
gust are 327,676 gross tons, an in- 
crease of 3904; divided as follows: 
Allied and neutral losses, 151,275, an 
increase of 10,027; British losses, 176,- 
401, a decrease of 6123. 

A firm in Barcelona, Spain, Con- 
strucciones & Pavimentos, has for 
some time been building small con- 
crete vessels and expanding its yards 
in order to enable the construction of 
large, ocean-going reinforced con- 
crete ships. On August 24 the fol- 
lowing cablegram was received by the 
Portland Cement Association, Chi- 
cago, from the firm mentioned: 
"First Spanish reinforced concrete 
sea-going ship built by us arrived 
successfully Barcelona harbor. Best 
greetings, American friends." As 
this Spanish firm was preparing last 
spring to build 6,000 ton concrete 
ships, it is likely that this message 
refers to the successful trial trip 
of the first of these large, reinforced 
concrete vessels completed. 

A Buenos Aires dispatch says that 
President Irigoyen had sent to Con- 
gress a bill designed to encourage 
shipbuilding. Under its provisions 
the government would lend assist- 
ance for the establishment of ship- 
yards and especially authorize long 
concessions in order to encourage 
the investment of private capital. 
The President's message, which was 
approved by the Cabinet, says that 
the difficult maritime situation as a 
result of the war found Argentina 
unprepared to alleviate with her own 
shipping the damage to interna- 
tional commerce caused by lack of 
ships, and that this unpreparedness 
was due largely to lack of encour- 
aging legislation for shipbuilding. 
The bill provides rewards for the 
rapid completion of shipyards. 

The past week brought victories 
everywhere and of every variety, 
naval, military, aerial, diplomatic and 
political. At sea we were sinking 
submarines and Bolshevik battleships; 
on land the enemy was retreating or 
suffering disastrous defeat on every 
front; in the air American and allied 
aviators were working havoc among 
[enemy flyers and dropping destruc- 
tion upon German towns; the diplo- 
mats of the Central Powers lost their 
heads in furious ravings over the ef- 
fects of American participation, and 
political turmoil ruled from Berlin to 
Sofia and Constantinople,, and from 
Vienna to the seat of the Bolshevik 
Government — wherever that mighl 
be. The mastery of Foch was seen 
in an unexpected attack by American 
troops in the long inactive Cham- 
pagne region. Instead of moving on 
Mei/, a point of German concentra- 
tion the Americans struck (o the 
west of Verdun and carried all ob- 
jectives as well as capturing many 
thousands of prisoners and much val- 
uable war material. Further again 
lo the w.sl and nearer to Rheims 
the French went surging over the 
top, gaining ground and bagging 
many prisoners. 



16 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits 



Artist— Sir, I will make you a 
speaking likeness of your wife. 

Patron— It wouldn't be a likeness 
if you didn't— Baltimore American. 



Canvasser— What party, Mrs. 
O'Grady, does your husband belong 
to? 

Mrs. O'Grady— I'm the party. 
What about it?— New York Globe. 

"What do you suppose will be the 
end of the woman question?" 

"There won't be any end. They'll 
always be asking them."— Baltimore 
American. 



Captainess— And what, Mine. Ma- 
yoress, shall I seize when we attack 
the city? 

Majoress— Anything of millinery 
value. — Town Topics. 



Post— There's a mistake some- 
where. 

Parker — How so? 

Post— Only 364 charities have asked 
me for one day's income.— Town 
Topics. 



Mrs. Dick— I wonder how soldiers 
in the trenches manage to get their 
clothes dry when they wash them. 

Mrs. Stick (cheerfully)— I suppose 
they hang them on their firing-line. 
— Town Topics. 



A Perfect Evening Spoiled. — "Isn't 
it glorious here?" she exclaimed 
when the waiter had taken their 
orders. 

•'Do you think so?" he replied. 

"It's perfectly lovely. Everything 
is in such beautiful harmony— the 
fountain, the trees, the swaying lan- 
terns, the music — everything is ideal. 
It's like Fairyland." 

"I'm glad you like it." 

"I'm simply enchanted. Doesn't 
it make you feel as if you had 
stepped out of the every-day world 
into something strange and new." 

"Not a bit." 

"What's the matter? You don't 
seem to be enjoying yourself." 

"My boss is sitting at the third 
table over there to your left, and 
I can tell by his look that he's 
wondering how I can afford to blow 
myself at a place like this." — Dayton 
News. 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
Of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now. In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how Ignorant the seaman may be, even In the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and In a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 




Christensen's Navigation 
School 

Established 1804 

257 HANSFORD BLDQ., 268 MARKET 

•TREET 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. 




SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront 
since 1 866 — over 50 years. Enough said. 

We DO NOT Supply Mattresses or Bedding to Vessels 

J. COHEN & CO. 



BUY 

MEN'S 

FURNISHINGS 

AI 




Market at Fifth 



BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 



72 EAST STREET 



Opposite Ferry Post Office 



Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



Joint Accounts 

This bank will open accounts In the 
name of two Individuals, for Instance, 
man and wife, either of whom may 
deposit money for or draw against 
the account. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Bagley's Gold Shore 

Packed in convenient pocket 
poucher. Contains more good 
Smoking Tobacco for the money 
than any package for the price. 
Why buy tin goods and pay rxtra 
for the tins. 



Union 
Made 



JJB ---co Usnd 6| 
IDUODWIRXEU^ 


tttADtti 

8 


rfta ol tht t~ «fl 

JirrotiiniDNU. 1 


mm 









HENRY HEINZ 



When You Buy 
from Us, Liberty 
Bonds are Ac- 
cepted for Cash. 



Phone Douglas 5752 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
Original Size 




SOLID GOLD $1.50 
GOLD FILLED .50 



Diamonds 

Watches ■ 64 market street 

High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



UNION LABEL SHIRTS 

AT FACTORY PRICES 
DIRECT TO WEARER 

EAGLESON & CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO, 1118 Market Street 
Los Angeles, 112-16 So. Spring Street Sacramento, 717 K Street 

Our Union Catalogue of Shirts and Furnishings 

Endorsed by San Francisco Labor Council 

San Francisco Building Trades Council 

San Francisco Label Section 

State Building Trades Council 



Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Silverware 



ScuemenCh 

715 MARKET STREET, Above Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Jewelers, Watchmakers, Opticians 

Big Stock — Everything Marked in Plain Figure* 

THE ONE-PRICE JEWELRY STORE 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 




Qames 3t. Sorensert 

ytfr*3. ana Jrtosj 
At the Big Rod Clock 
. and th« Chi moo. 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 
Phono Kearny 518 

Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Boots, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing 

of All Kinds, Watches, 

Jewelry, Etc. 

676 THIRD STREET 

At 3rd and Townsend, San Francisco, Cal. 




I Want You 
Seamen 
to wear 



Union 
Hats 



M 

£k I $2.50, $3.50 

^^^^^^ $5.00 

"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

Deserves Your Patronage 



Union Store 
Union Clerks 



72 Market Street 

Next to Ocean Market 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 



■CD SEAL LKiAi CO., MANUrACTUKEtS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phono Douglas 1660 



OVERALLS & PANTS 

UNION MADE *■ 

ARGONAUT S« 



L.J 






FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 








A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: 


Justice by Organization. 




VOL. XXXII, No. 5. SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1918. 




Whole No. 2507. 









PRESIDENT'S M ESSAG E TO SEAMEN. 

American Seamen, Active and Retired, Called To Help Win The War. 



To All Those on Land or Sea Who 
Have Followed a Seafaring Life: 

The men who go down to the sea 
in ships have become an important 
factor in our national life. Their serv- 
ices are extremely essential in handling 
the ships to carry our soldiers in safety 
to Europe, in transporting the muni- 
tions and food supplies for their main- 
tenance and the material for the sus- 
tenance of the armies and peoples of 
the countries with which we are as- 
sociated. 

Safety in handling transports and 
merchant vessels requires not only a 
knowledge of navigation and the de- 
tails of management, maintenance and 
control, but also that long experience 
with the various conditions at sea which 
gives confidence, quick judgment and 
steady action in an emergency. There 
are many men with this kind of expe- 
rience employed on our merchant ma- 
rine and many others who have left 
the sea and are now following other 
occupations. The vigorous prosecu- 
tion of the war has impelled us to 
build vessels in larger numbers than 
ever before. We are launching a con- 
tinuously increasing tonnage. These 
vessels will need skilled seamen to man 
them. No more honorable or service- 



able task can come to any of our people 
than that of manning our merchant 
marine. With an increasing tonnage 
being put into service we must know 
where skilled men can be obtained to 
furnish at least the basis of the crews 
that are to man them. With such in- 
formation available there will be no 
doubt about the efficient manning of 
our vessels for the entire period of the 
war. 

The history of American seamanship 
is a glowing record of patriotism, cour- 
age and achievement unsurpassed by 
any people anywhere. I therefore con- 
fidently call upon all seamen and all 
men engaged in other occupations who 
have heretofore been seamen to give, 
in connection with the questionnaires 
they submit to the local draft boards, 
full information about their rating and 
experience at sea to enable the boards 
to place them in their proper classifica- 
tion and give to the Government a 
knowledge of where experienced sea- 
men may be secured when their serv- 
ices are required. The kind of skill 
that makes an efficient seaman can only 
be obtained at sea. Tt is the product 
of experience and must include among 
other things that subconscious swaying 
of the body to the motion of the vessel 
known as "sea legs." There can be no 
safe, efficient management of vessels 
that does not include a large propor- 



tion of officers and crew having skill 
and experience. It is indispensable in 
emergencies such as we must be pre- 
pared to meet in times of war. 

It is the patriotic duty of young men 
who join the merchant service to make 
every effort to learn their work in the 
shortest possible time and of the skilled 
men to assist these young men in their 
efforts. It is the duty of owners and 
managers of vessels to co-operate in 
this work and to give to the young men 
such shipmates and such treatment as 
will cause them to respect the service 
and build up within them a desire to 
make it their lifework. The work of 
a seaman is so vitally important to the 
conduct of the war that it has become 
necessary for the Government to pro- 
vide deferred classification for them in 
its efforts to secure a sufficient supply 
of skilled men for the maintenance of 
speed and safety. Having in mind the 
brilliant record of the American mer- 
chant marine, the honorable position 
it occupies in economic affairs, and the 
important part it plays in winning the 
war, every seaman should give to the 
service the best that is in him and 
should not hesitate to accept deferred 
classification when the Government 
has decided that such deferred classi- 
fication is necessary no matter how 
eager he may be to join the fighting 
forces of the Army or the Navy. 

Woodrow Wilson. 



v. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



RAMMING A SUBMARINE. 



The King's Bench Division has recently 
held that ramming a submerged object on 
the part of a steamer in the belief that 
such object is a submarine, is an act per- 
formed in consequence of hostilities and 
that the damage sustained therefrom is one 
which the war risk, and not the marine, 
underwriters are liable. The question arose 
through an action brought by the owners 
of the S. S. "Express," claiming a total loss 
on the vessel. About 1 a. m. on April 4, 
1917, the "Express" was on a voyage from 
Fecamp to Southampton Water. About 
20 miles northwest of Cape Antifer the 
master, who was on the bridge, saw a semi- 
submerged object, which he took for a 
German submarine, about 100 yards away. 
The master immediately gave orders to 
ram the object ; the ship struck it violently, 
and damaged itself seriously. Although the 
vessel was not far from shore and was in 
the track of other shipping, she was unable 
to attract assistance, and after keeping 
afloat for several hours she sank. 

On these facts the plaintiffs (Henry Mac- 
Gregor, Ltd.) submitted that there was 
clearly a loss by marine perils, and, alter- 
natively, that there was a loss by war 
risks. They claimed under (a) a Lloyd's 
policy for £1,835 on hull and machinery, 
valued at £5,000, such policy covering the 
usual perils, but containing the f.c. and s. 
clause, and under (b) two policies sub- 
scribed by the North of England Protec- 
tion and Indemnity Association, for £2,000 
on hull, machinery, etc., valued at £5,000, 
and for £3,000 additional on the aforesaid 
valuation of £5,000, such policies covering 
only (1) risks of capture, seizure, or de- 
tainment by the King's, enemies and the 
consequence thereof, or any attempt there- 
at, and all consequences of hostilities or 
warlike operations by or against the King's 
enemies, whether before or after the dec- 
laration of war, and (2) all risks not 
covered by section (1) above which were 
excluded from recovery under the ordinary 
policies on hull or machinery by reason of 
the presence in such policies of the free 
of capture and seizure clause of the Insti- 
tute clauses then in use, or by other sim- 
ilar, but not more extensive, warranty. 

The marine underwriters contended that 
the loss was excepted by the f.c. and s. 
clause, and was not due to a peril insured 
against by the marine underwriters. The 
war risk underwriters contended that the 
object rammed was not a submarine at all 
and therefore the loss was due to marine, 
and not war risks. 

The "Express" was a small boat built in 
1869 and carrying only eight hands. 

The Court held that without doubt the 
steamer was ultimately lost by a peril of 
the sea, but the marine risk underwriters 
were entitled to show, if they could, that 
on the facts the risk was excluded by the 
f.c. and s. clause. It was very difficult to 
say what the object rammed really was: 
at that spot one was quite likely to meet 
with a German submarine, and one was 
also quite likely to meet with floating 
wreckage. The evidence left the question 
in doubt whether the object was a sub- 
marine or not. He thought that it did not 
make any difference to the result. It was 
clear that the captain, a competent navi- 
gator, honestly believed the object to be 
a submarine and thought it his best course 
to destroy it before it could destroy him : 



ami to attack it was the most reasonable 
for him to do. His action, though 
offensive, was the best defensive method, 
and was clearly a warlike operation or a 
consequence of hostilities, and his judg- 
ment must therefore be against the war 
risks underwriters, with costs. 

The costs of the successful defendants, 
the marine risks underwriters, must be 
borne by the plaintiffs and could not be 
recovered by them from the unsuccessful 
defendants. 



THE PROFIT-SHARING FALLACY. 



Profit-sharing is an attempt to throw the 
workers off the track that leads to victory. 

Labor and Capital, it is claimed by those 
who advocate it, should end their conflict by 
entering into partnership and sharing profits 
on a definite basis of division. 

I f the workers were to accept this seem- 
ingly generous proposal, they would find their 
last case worse than their first. 

Speeding up would inevitably result in the 
effort to augment their share by increasing 
profits. And there'd be a tendency to con- 
nive at high prices, with the same end in view. 

The total effect would be most damaging 
to the interests of the working class. They 
would produce more, and get less. Their 
labor would become intensified, while their 
purchasing power would decline. 

The workers would do the speeding up, for 
Capital as such is incapable of exertion. The 
workers would pay the high prices, for Cap- 
ital as such is not a consumer. 

Tn>tead of improving their economic condi- 
tion by profit-sharing, any general adoption 
of the scheme would lower the status of the 
workers and confirm their servitude. 

There is another aspect of the matter, and 
a vitally important one. Profit-sharing would 
destroy Unionism. 

The interests of the workers would be split 
np and divided among unrelated commercial 
enterprises, many of them in actual competi- 
tion with one another. No longer would they 
be bound together for the redress of wrongs 
suffered in common and the assertion of rights 
demanded in common. 

They would be rivals in business, and all 
their hopes would center on pushing the par- 
ticular concern with which they were asso- 
ciated, thus rendering vastly more difficult 
any united purpose. 

Unionism would disappear, and with Union- 
ism the most powerful factor making for the 
progress of the race. 

This is a feature of profit-sharing that will 
commend it to capitalists, because the progress 
of the race means the elimination of their 
class dominance and the establishment of 
an Industrial Commonwealth in which they 
would have no function to perform. 

But it would be disastrous for the workers, 
riveting upon them the chains of slavery, and 
stripping them of their historic mission of 
carrying on the evolution of society, and, by 
liberating themselves, setting free mankind. 

A big Australian firm recently announced 
its intention of putting its employes on a 
profit-sharing footing, its managing director 
declaring that in this method lay the solution 
of the industrial problem. 

That many other firms will follow suit, es- 
pecially after the war, when the labor situa- 
tion will be pregnant with revolutionary pos- 
sibilities, there can be little doubt. 

The workers must be on their guard against 
this cunning and plausible confidence trick. 
Nothing is for their good that disperses their 



• its in a thousand different direction-, 
instead of concentrating them on one desired 
goal. 

The industrial problem will never be solved 
till Capital ceases to be regarded as an active 
participant in production, rightly demanding 
profits, and becomes what it really is, a mere 
instrument in the hands of Labor, no more 
entitled to dividends than a pick or a shovel. 
— The Australian Worker. 



BRITAIN'S TIMBER RESOURCES. 



( )pinions prevalent before the war as to 
Great Britain's home timber resources have 
been proved by the experiences of the past 
year to have been wrong, says the Timber 
Trades Journal, of London. 

In 1911 the Journal estimated that if the 
supplies of pitwood from overseas were cut 
off the coal mines of the United Kingdom 
would after a brief period shut down and 
the manufactories would cease working. The 
Journal now says: 

"We are glad to find after this country 
has been at war for nearly four years that 
this statement was far from correct. Last 
year (1917) 995,000 loads of mining timber 
were imported, as compared with the corre- 
sponding importation of 2,477,000 loads for 
the year 1914 ; and this considerable saving 
in tonnage has been met by no less a quan- 
tity than just under two million tons being 
produced during 1917 from British forests. 
We hear on good authority that as the result 
of a recent careful survey of standing tim- 
ber in the United Kingdom, provided the 
necessary labor and transport can be found, 
there is no need for anxiety for many years 
ahead in regard to the ability to supply the 
necessary pitwood to our mines. As regards 
sawn wood, it is estimated that we are now 
producing today in these islands, from all 
sources, at the rate of between 400,000 and 
500,000 standards per annum, which speaks 
very well for the energy displayed by those 
merchants who have turned their efforts in 
this time of stress to the exploitation of 
home-grown woods. It is consoling, also, to 
know that concurrently with this rate of 
production, there are good reserves of soft 
woods, while as regards hard woods, in the 
shape of oak, elm, beech and chestnut, there 
is an enormous quantity available. One thing 
the adversities of war have brought out is 
that the qualities of our British home-grown 
timber are equal to those of a large portion 
of the imported wood." 



WHAT IS EDUCATION? 



A man is educated only in so far as he is 
able to relate his knowledge and acquire- 
ments to the business of human living here 
and now. 

Learning is not education. A man may 
possess a vast amount of learning and yet 
be a fool. Here information is not education. 
To know how to make the right use of in- 
formation is the only education. The encyclo- 
pedia is packed with all the scientific and 
literary facts of the world, but it cannot use 
one of them. 

There is a great deal more learning than 
education in the world. Our schools and col- 
leges are for the most part well called, "In- 
stitutions of Learning." That they are, but 
of education, I am sorry to say — not. 

To yoke up learning with life must be the 
great educational work of the future. — Bruce 
Calvert, in The Open Road. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



War Munition Plant Seized by President. 

The President has commandeered the 
war munitions plant of the Smith & Wes- 
son Company, Springfield, Mass., because 
it has "refused to accept the mediation 
of the National War Labor Board and has 
flaunted its rules of decision approved by 
Presidential proclamation." 

It is announced that Captain Walter A. 
Foster of the War Department has been 
placed in charge of the plant. Details of 
administration will be carried on by offi- 
cers of the company. By seizing the plant 
the National War Labor Board's award 
will be placed in effect. 

The most objectionable part of this 
award was the abrogation of private con- 
tracts with employes, thereby permitting 
the employes to act collectively. Rather 
than accept the award the company asked 
the Government to take over the plant. 
In its letter to the War Department the 
company indulged in no "open shop" 
camouflage to conceal its anti-unionism. 
It declared that it conducted a non-union 
shop and before it employed workers they 
had to agree that they would not join a 
union while so employed. The National 
War Labor Board set these contracts aside 
during the period of the war, although the 
United States Supreme Court, last De- 
cember, had legalized this contract in in- 
junction proceedings against the Mine 
Workers' and Flint Glass Workers' unions. 

The following statement by the company 
indicates how important the court's de- 
cision was to anti-union employers until 
the National War Labor Board threw it in 
the scrap heap with other before-the-war 
antiquities : 

"In the matter of grievances it (the 
company) has dealt only with individuals 
and has not recognized shop committees." 



German Government Apart from People. 

One of the most popular of the educa- 
tional pamphlets issued by the Committee 
on Public Information is entitled "The 
Government of Germany," by Charles D. 
Hazen, professor of European history, 
Columbia University, New York City. 

"The German Empire," he says, "is a 
confederation, founded in 1871, and founded 
by the princes, not by the people, and 
consists of twenty-five states and one im- 
perial territory, Alsace-Lorraine. The king 
of Prussia is ipso facto German emperor. 
The legislative power rests with two bod- 
ies, the Bundesrat, or Federal Council, 
and the Reichstag. The emperor declares 
war with the consent of the Bundesrat, 
the assent of the Reichstag not being re- 
quired. Not even the Bundesrat need be 
consulted if the war is defensive, and as 
the Hohenzollerns have always claimed to 
make defensive warfare, it is not surpris- 
ing that even the unrepresentative Bundes- 
rat was officially informed about the pres- 
ent war three days after the emperor de- 
clared it. 

"The Bundesrat, of which we in America 
hear very little, is the most powerful body 
in the empire, far more powerful than the 
Reichstag, of which we hear a great deal. 
It possesses legislative, executive and ju- 



dicial functions, and is a kind of diplomatic 
assembly. It represents the states, that is, 
the rulers of the twenty-five states of 
which the empire consists. It is composed 
of delegates appointed by the rulers. Un- 
like the Senate of the United States, the 
states of Germany are not represented 
equally in the Bundesrat, but most un- 
equally. There are sixty-one members. 
Of these Prussia has seventeen, and the 
three votes allotted to Alsace-Lorraine 
since 1891 are 'instructed' by the emperor. 
Thus Prussia has 20. Bavaria has 6, Sax- 
ony and Wurttemberg 4 each, others 3 or 2, 
and seventeen of the states have only one 
apiece. The members are really diplomats, 
representing the numerous monarchs of 
Germany. 

"The princes of Germany have an ab- 
solute veto upon the only popular element 
in the Government, the Reichstag. Repre- 
senting the princes of Germany, the 
Bundesrat is a thoroughly monarchial in- 
stitution, a bulwark of the monarchial 
order. The proceedings of this princely 
assembly are secret, which is one reason 
why we know and hear less about it than 
we do about the Reichstag." 



Will Reclaim Cripples. 

Thousands of workers permanently dis- 
abled in accidents are to be reclaimed and 
trained for some useful occupation, accord- 
ing to plans being perfected by the Penn- 
sylvania Workmen's Compensation Board. 

The plan was started at the hearing of 
more than a score of "commutation" cases 
before the board in Philadelphia. In these 
cases, workers who have lost arms, legs 
or eyes will ask for lump sums of com- 
pensation instead of weekly payments. The 
board placed before these workers the plan 
to pay the full amounts, provided artificial 
limbs and necessary medical treatment are 
immediately obtaned and the worker agrees 
to go through vocational training at some 
institution designated by the "board. 

Plans for the project have been drawn 
by Harry Mackey, chairman of the Work- 
men's Compensation Board, and the next 
Legislature is to be asked to provide re- 
habilitation institutions for training these 
workers. 

At least 2500 workmen have been per- 
manently disabled since January, 1916, 
when the Pennsylvania Compensation Act 
went into effect, and hundreds of thous- 
ands of dollars are being paid them 
monthly. 

In calling attention to the rehabilitating 
of disabled soldiers who have returned to 
this country, Mr. Mackey said that the 
army of injured workmen at home is just 
as important to help. 



Gains by Broom Makers. 
In a letter to American Federation of 
Labor Secretary Frank Morrison, William 
R. Boyer, Secretary-Treasurer of the In- 
ternational Broom and Whisk Makers' 
Union, reports a very large increase in 
membership the past three month's and 
that "our members everywhere are secur- 
ing new wage agreements with splendid 
advances in wages." Last December, when 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 

International Seamen's Union of America, 328- 
332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes des France, 33 Rue Grange 
aux-Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord, 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fryboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundt, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten 1 B., Sweden. 
DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade 15, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhavn 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nationale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina IS, Austria. 

SPAIN. 

Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 
Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de laneiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo des Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 3SS Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's Worker. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



The farm-labor situation is said to 
have become serious in England, and 
introduction of labor-saving machin- 
ery has resulted on a much wider 
basis than has ever before been 
attempted. By making full use of 
the farm machinery, and utilizing 
every agricultural worker available, 
the farmers have, on the whole, been 
fairly successful in harvesting their 
1918 crops. 

At the end of 1916 there were at 
work in the United Kingdom 1,488 
industrial, co-operative, distributive 
and productive societies with an ag- 
gregate membership of 3,563,769, a 
total share, loan and reserve capital 
of £77,937, j '36; a total trade (distrib- 
utive and productive) of £237,525,135, 
and a total profit — before deduction 
of interest on share capital — of £18,- 
958,388. Excepting for a decrease of 
ten in the number of societies — due 
mainly to amalgamations — these fig- 
ures show a remarkable growth as 
eompared with 1915, there being an 
increase in membership of 257,450, or 
7.8 per cent.; in capital of £7,611,- 
259, or 10.8 per cent.; in trade of 
£39,290,948, or 19.8 per cent.; and in 
profit of £1,990,439, or 11.7 per cent. 
The total number of persons directly 
employed by the societies was 154,- 
622, and the total wages paid during 
the year amounted to £10,391,245, 
compared with 149,852 employees and 
£9,607,434 in wages in 1915. 

The first number of The Month's 
Work, a magazine issued by the Brit- 
ish Ministry of Labor, has just made 
its appearance. In a "Foreword" the 
Minister of Labor expresses the hope 
that the magazine will "serve as a 
link between all those, without dis- 
tinctive rank or grade, who are called 
upon to deal with industrial prob- 
lems." Reference is made to some of 
the principal activities of the Minis- 
try and, as regards the Local Ad- 
visory Committees in connection with 
the Employment Exchanges, the Min- 
ister observes that "a ready means of 
inter-communication between the com- 
mittees, engaged as they are in su- 
pervising the application, under con- 
ditions which vary greatly in detail, 
of principles which are fundamentally 
the same, is urgently demanded. In 
this way it is hoped that The Month's 
Work will play an effective part, 
stimulating that interest and imagina- 
tion in dealing with industrial ques- 
tions, which may be anticipated as 
the special outcome of the work of 
the committees." 

The report of a parliamentary com- 
mittee appointed to investigate con- 
ditions surrounding child labor in 
Austria discovered a most deplorable 
condition, according to the Arbeiter 
Zeitung of Vienna. More than one- 
third of all school children are en- 
gaged in some kind of work. In 
some districts all the children of 
school age are working. Out of every 
100 school children between 6 and 8 
years, 18 are at work; between 9 and 
10, 35; between 11 and 12, 50; and 
between 13 and 14, 52. Two-fifths 
of these children have been working 
from the time they were 5 or 6 years 
old. Out of every 100 children, 95 
worked during the school year as 
well as during holiday periods. Much 
of the child labor is performed at 
home with parents and nearly three- 
fourths of all the children are em- 
ployed 52 weeks in the year. About 
one-fourth are engaged in night 
work. So serious is the situation 
that new legislation which will pre- 
vent the employment of children 
under 12 years of age, except on 
farms and in household tasks, is now 
being considered. 



M. BROWN &t SONS 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



LIPPMAN'S 

Head to Foot Clothiers for Men 

Fourteen Years in San Pedro 

532 Beacon Street 

531 Front Street 

Two Entrance! 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



FRERICHS NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

529'/ 2 BEACON STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

Seafaring people who desire to take up navigation, San Pedro, situated In the sunny 
south Is the Ideal place. Captain Frerlchs has established a Navigation School here 
and under his undivided personal supervision students will be thoroughly prepared 
to pass successfully before the United States Steamboat Inspectors. 

TERMS ARE REASONABLE 



S. G. SWANSON 

Established 1904 
For the BEST there is in TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
NOTE s. i;. Swansoo is not connected 
Willi any dye works and lias mi solicitors. 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2d Floor, Bank of San Pedro, 110 W. 6th St. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront, Cal. 



Carl Hansen, a native of Soon, 
Norway, age 35, formerly a member 
of the Lake Seamen's Union, is in- 
quired for by his mother. Mam 
Hansen, 778 Sixth Ave., Milwaukee, 
Wis. 8-17-18 



Phone Douglas 3726 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 East Street, San Francisco 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 

OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 

CUT THIS OUT! 

and send it with 25c and receive by re- 
turn mail Regular Dollar Size Package 
of our Famous Egyptian Beauty Cream, 

CREMONILE 
A Beauty Builder of Highest Order. 
V.i i will be moie than delighted with 
the result. 

S. J. CHURCHILL CHEMICAL CO., 
Beaumont, Texas 



The Anglo- California Trust Company 

As successors to the SWEDISH-AMERICAN BANK 
offers a particularly convenient service to 

SEA FARING MEN and to the SCANDINAVIAN PEOPLE 

in California 

ANGLO-CALIFORNIA TRUST CO. 

Main Office: Northeast Cor. MARKET and SANSOME STREETS 

BRANCHES: 

16th and Mission Streets Fillmore and Geary Streets 

Third and Twentieth Streets 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $ 1,910,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 17,000,000 

COMMERCIAL SAVINGS TRUST 



Olof Nilsson, born in Hufvulsvik, 
Jamtland, Sweden, year 1880, height 
5 ft. 8 in., brown eyes, dark brown 
hair; last heard from in 1909, on 
board S. S. "Kurrachee," Karrachi, 
India. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify his sister, Mrs. 
Nels Olson, 1033^ W. First St., Du- 
luth, Minn. 8-21-18-Adv. 

The men hereinafter named are 
requested to call personally or com- 
municate with J. T. Smith, 112 Mar- 
ket St., San Francisco, Cal. Chas. 
Frascr, W. Holmes, Otto Kanka, 
Karl Olsen, William B. Pierce, 
Thomas Wolstenholme. 10-2-18-Adv. 



NOTICE. 
Masters, Mates and Pilots' 
Association of the Pacific has 
opened a branch office at 529J4 
Beacon St., San Pedro, Cal. ; Capt. 
H. C. Frerichs, Agent. 




Cdwoufk^Deccives 

=but only at long range. 

If you buy a $50 Liberty Bond when you can afford a $1000 
Bond, your conscience will remind you for the rest of your 
life that you have helped THE BOCHE. 



Buy Fourth Liberty Bonds 

Any Bank Wi!l Help You 



ji 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



The Concrete Craft Corporation, organized to 
build concrete ships at Seattle, has filed articles 
of incorporation with capital stock at $1,000,000. 
The trustees are: G. E. Kastengrew, Israel Nel- 
son, Louis Rolfe, Jeremiah Miller, of Seattle, 
and C. E. Hogberg, Tacoma. 

Lumber shipments from British Columbia for 
August were as follows: To Japan, via Seattle 
and Tacoma by scow, 3,898,635 feet; to United 
Kingdom, 2,534,089; to Galveston, presumably for 
U. K., 178,376; to China and Japan, 836,325; to 
Australia, 306,604; total, 7,754,029 feet. 

Many of the fishermen who have returned to 
San Francisco from Alaskan waters are prepar- 
ing to go after salmon in the Sacramento and 
San Joaquin rivers. It is reported that the sal- 
mon are running better in the Sacramento than 
for many years past and the catch will add ma- 
terially to the supply. 

The St. Johns plant of the American Marine 
Iron Works, Portland, Ore., has been incor- 
porated with the following directors: S. F. Wil- 
son, M. L. Jones, T. II. Beverly, A. M. Cannon 
and Carl Jones. It has acquired two blocks on 
the Willamette river at the foot of Richmond 
street and a foundry and machine shop are being 
equipped. 

Captain Ryan and Lieutenant Barton arc 
scheduled to arrive in Portland shortly to open 
an office to recruit for a stevedore and labor 
battalion for overseas service. Men who can 
qualify for officers in the battalion are said to 
be in special demand. The battalion is to be 
assigned to the European end of the American 
transport and merchant marine system. 

Captain Joseph J. Meany of San Francisco, 
traveling inspector of the United States Steam 
Vessel Inspection Bureau, is at Portland to look 
over work being done on ships here by local 
inspectors and to see that the laws of the De- 
partment of Commerce are being enforced. Cap- 
tain Meany formerly was inspector of hulls here. 
Work planned by Captain Meany will take about 
three weeks. 

Captain Robert Lee Russell, Commandant of 
the Twelfth Naval District, which embraces the 
Pacific Coast, has been assigned to the position 
of Commandant at Samoa, it was learned from 
semi-official sources during the week. Previous 
reports were to the effect that Captain Russell, 
who is to be succeeded at San Francisco by 
Rear-Admiral Joseph L. Jayne, had been ordered 
to the island of Guam. Samoa is an important 
base in the South Pacific. 

The license of Captain Albert Egeholm, former 
master of the motor-ship "Erris," was suspended 
eighteen months by local Inspectors James Guth- 
rie and Joseph Dolan at San Francisco on the 
charge of negligence. The inspectors said the 
vessel probably would not have gone on the 
rocks, April 22, off the coast of Japan, if the 
skipper had taken bearings by the compass. The 
motor-ship was floated from her precarious posi- 
tion and later met with several mishaps. 

The Hawaiian Islands have an estimated popu- 
lation today of 256,180, according to the annual 
report of the Board of Health just submitted to 
the Governor. Honolulu's population is about 
75,000, while the rest of the island of Oahu is 
placed at 41,500. The population of Hilo, the 
territory's next largest city, is 10,500, and the 
rest of the island of Hawaii is 41,500. The 
Japanese population is estimated at 106,800. A 
large increase is noted this year among the 
Japanese. 

According to Crowley and Peterson, the San 
Francisco barge business is growing by leaps 
and bounds and more than 2 per cent, of the 
local freight on and off ships is now being 
handled by the lighter method. The lighters of 
both concerns and also a ' few operated by 
smaller concerns are being crowded to the limit. 
Shipping concerns are saving time by utilizing 
the barge system. Tn some instances two days 
have been saved for a vessel's stay in port, with 
the charter price reckoned at $3000 a day. 

Suit for damages of $26,600 has been filed in 
the Federal Court at San Francisco against the 
American motor-ship "Erris" and the American 
Asiatic Company. The action is brought by Sir 
Robert Balfour, Sir Archibald Williamson, A. B. 
Williamson, A. W. Blackie, T. J. Whitson, John 
Lawson, W. J. Burns, Alexander Baillie, doing 
business under the name of Balfour, Guthrie & 
Co., and Charles D. Willitts. Shipments of castor 
and bean oil arriving, it is contended, in a dam- 
aged condition are responsible for the action. 

The dredge "Chinook" has ceased work for 
the year at the mouth of the Columbia river. 
Captain Cann, master of the craft, received or- 
ders during the week to lay the vessel up for 
the winter. The "Chinook" has done excellent 
work during the present summer and as a result 
the entrance to the Columbia river is now in 
better condition than is any other bar harbor 
in the world and the deepest draft craft can 
enter and depart at any stage of the tide. At 
the mouth of the Tiver proper there is a channel 
2500 feel wide with a depth of from 40 to 42 
feet. 

H, G. Seaborn, vice-president of the Skinner 
& Eddy Corporation, of Seattle, which it is said 
has led all others in the delivery of contract 
ships to date, announces that the concern has 



produced a little in excess of one-eighth of one 
ton per man per day for the year. At that rate 
it would require only 225 steel ways in the 
United States to produce approximately 10,000,000 
tons deadweight per year and, Mr. Seaborn says, 
only 250,000 men distributed over these 225 ways 
to obtain the same approximate results. The 
Skinner & Eddy yard has employed an average 
of 4527 men for the last twelve months. With 
the facilities now in operation, Mr. Seaborn de- 
clares it is not too optimistic for the Shipping 
Board to expect at least 10,000,000 deadweight 
tons in the second year of its operation. 

Working with the Port of Portland and the 
Commission of Public Docks, the Portland 
Chamber of Commerce is considering a plan of 
harbor development suggested by J. H. Rosseter 
during his visit there, prior to taking up his 
duties as director of operations for the Emer- 
gency Fleet Corporation. The plan includes and 
will give a large new dry dock, a capacious, 
modern machine shop on the shore by the dry 
dock for vessel repair; a barge equipped with a 
light machine shop repair plant, to go alongside 
vessels and make the repairs while the craft is 
working her cargo; adequate storage to cover a 
possible requirement of 40,000 or 50,000 tons of 
coal for ship bunkering per month; facilities for 
putting coal aboard vessels in the stream while 
working cargo, and barge facilities for putting 
fuel oil into a ship while working cargo. 

Statistics relating to timber products of British 
Columbia for 1917 are contained in the annual 
report of the forest branch just issued. The 
total of lumber scaled in the province of British 
Columbia for the year ending December 31, 1917, 
was 1,647,275,000 board feet. This compares with 
an actual cut for 1916 of 1,161,750,000 board 
feet and 991,780,200 in 1915. This is an increase 
of virtually 42 per cent, over the 1916 cut. The 
value of the production in 1917 was $48,300,469, 
as compared with $35,528,000 in 1916, $29,150,000 
in 1915 and $28,680,000 in 1914. The value of 
the timber cut was $28,225,000 as against $21,- 
075,000 in 1916. The value of the pulp product 
was almost double, being $6,835,034 in 1917 as 
against $3,520,000 in 1916. Shingles in value 
also constituted a large increase, being $6,900,000 
in 1917, as compared with $4,500,000 in 1916. 

According to advices received from Papeete, 
Tahiti, the British bark "County of Roxburg" 
cannot be salvaged because her old iron sides 
have become so badly rusted and decayed that 
the craft would not pay for salving. Not only 
is the vessel about eaten up with rust, but the 
hull is split in two. The result is that Theo- 
dore Wicks, the San Francisco diver, and his 
men have returned to Papeete and will soon 
return to San Francisco minus the "Roxburg." 
The advices say that the vessel could have been 
moved from the beach into the water without 
great difficulty, hut the question of keeping 
the vessel afloat afterwards was a problem. The 
ship will therefore remain high and dry on the 
beach until it breaks to pieces, and in the mean- 
time the natives will have a handy place to 
store their copra and other products. The ves- 
sel is now a warehouse. When the expedition 
left San Francisco for Takarora it was generally 
supposed that the "Roxburg" was in good con- 
dition. The local backers of the expedition 
expended a considerable amount and believed 
that all was going well until they received a 
cablegram announcing the abandonment of the 
work. An effort is being made to dispose of 
the salving equipment, but as theer are no 
other wrecks in the South Seas worth salving, 
it is expected that the timbers and other sup- 
plies will have to be shipped to some other 
port for disposal. There was a rumor along 
the San Francisco water front of other sal- 
ving operations now being considered by 
decided upon. One is to salve the German 
decided upon. One is to salvage the German 
raider sunk in the harbor of Guam. It is not 
believed that enough money can be raised to 
go after this work because of the depth in 
which this craft is submerged. In addition, the 
local capitalists say that, in the event of success, 
there will be little real profit left after the 
Government collects the war tax. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone, Sutter 
5807. (Advt.) 



SILAS B. AXTELL, attorney for the Eastern 
& Gulf Sailors' Assn., Marine Cooks & Stewards' 
Association, Marine Firemen, Oilers & Water 
Tenders' Union, has moved his offices to the 
ground floor of the Washington Building, One 
Broadway, New York. Entrance room J, ground 
floor. Consultation and advice on all matters 
relating to enforcement of the Seamen's Act, 
claims for Compensation or damages, will be 
given free of charge as in the past, by Mr. 
Axtell and his expert assistants, Mr. Vernon S. 
Jones and Mr. Arthur Lavenburg. (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' 

FEDERATION. 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS: 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRTOR, Secretary 

l^A Lewis Street 

Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md ADOLF KILE, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 
NEW YORK CITY.... GUST AVE H. BROWN, Agent 

51 South Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa... OSCAR CHRISTIANSEN, Agt 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

64 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va...S. ALEXANDERSON, Agent 

123 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala CHARLES RAVING, Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La. .. .CHARLES HANSON, Agent 

400% Fulton Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex GEO. SCHROEDER, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I CHAS. CLAUSEN, Agent 

27 Wickenden Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y 12 South Street 

H. P. GRIFFIN, President 

W. L. CARTLEDGE, Secretary-Treasurer 

Telephone Bowling Green 8840-8841 

New York Branch D. E. GRANGE, Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 

Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass J. A. MARTIN, Agent 

6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La R. T. KAIZER, Agent 

228 Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK, Va WM. QUINN, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS WM. J. SIGGERS, Agent 

127 Twenty-third Street 

BALTIMORE, Md A. KILE, Sub. Agent 

802-804 South Broadway 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa..O. CHRISTIANSEN, Sub. Agt. 

206 Moravian Street 

MOBILE, Ala C. RAVING, Sub. Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex...G. SCHROEDER, Sub. Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex J. CLAUSEN, Sub. Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 40 Burling Slip 

Telephone John 396 
New York Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 164 Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN, N. Y 110 Hamilton Avenue 

Branches: 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa 138 South Second Street 

BALTIMORE, Md 802 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va 127 Twenty-third Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex 132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex 221 20th Street 

BOSTON, Mass 196 Commercial Street 

NORFOLK, Va 513 East Main Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La 400% Fulton Street 

MOBILE, Ala 104 S. Commerce Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. 1 27 Wickenden Street 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 

Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Agency: 
GLOUCESTER, Mass 163 Main Street 



LAKE DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, 111 324-332 West Randolph Street 

Telephone Franklin 278 
Branches and Agencies: 

BUFFALO. N. Y 65 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone Hanover 240. 

ASHTABULA, 85 Bridge Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 44 Shelby Street 

Telephone Cherry 342. 

CONNKATTT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, III 9214 Harbor Avenue 

TOLEDO, 821 Summit Street 

(Continued on Page 11.) 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



The Seamen's Journal 

Published weekly at San Francisco 
BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAUL SCH ARRENBERG Editor 

S. A. SILVER Business Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 
One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



$1.00 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second- 
Class matter. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of Octo- 
1917, authorized September 7, 1918. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 

v Street, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the .TOHRNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
"f the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript, 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1918. 



WARTIME IMMIGRATION. 



Immigration, it has been popularly sup- 
posed, has practically stopped, so far as the 
I Inited States is concerned, since the entrance 
of this country into the world war. Yet Com- 
missioner of Immigration Anthony Caminetti, 
of the Department of Labor, finds that sta- 
tistics reported to his office by agents of 
the department stationed at the various 
American ports show immigration to have 
increased everywhere except at the Atlantic 
ports. 

The number of immigrants formerly enter- 
ing at Atlantic ports was, of course, by far 
the greatest number, and lack of immigration 
lias diminished the labor supply and checked 
the abnormal school enrollments of many 
eastern cities. The increases in immigration 
through Gulf and Pacific ports and from 
Canada have been so large, however, that 
alien arrivals are still an important factor. 

Spain and Scandinavia are sending some 
immigrants to America, and Mexican im- 
migration has doubled within two years. The 
belligerent nations, naturally, are sending 
few men to America, for practically all the 
able-bodied manhood has been summoned to 
the colors. 

There is a curious development in con- 
nection with the immigration of workers 
from Mexico. The Mexican Government is 
openly discouraging the emigration of its 
people. It is fearful of losing, even tempo- 
rarily, its best workers and mechanics. Proof 
of this is found in the iron-clad regulations 
now enforced on the southern side of the 
border line, practically stopping great masses 
of Mexican workers who desire to come into 
the United States and obtain the high war 
wages of this country. 

Nothing, however, can entirely prevent 
Mexican workers from finding the best 
market for their labor, and every night the 
shallow waters of the- Rio Grande are 
crossed by wading workers who risk all to 
get into the United States. Laredo and Eagle 
Pass are the official doorways from Mexico, 
but only a fraction of the thousands from the 
southern republic officially, and legally, enter 
this country. 

The labor crisis for the United States is 



rapidly centering on the border. Mexico con- 
tains 14,000,000 workers, the nearest, the 
most easily assimilated mass of peoples out- 
side of the United States. The Department 
of Labor has wisely decided that the standard 
of living in this country can be more easily 
retained and attained by Mexican workers 
than that of any other available nationality. 
With this conviction in mind Secretary of 
Labor Wilson answered the millionaire em- 
ployers of California, who demanded that the 
bars be let down for an influx of Asiatic 
labor, by making provision for the entrance 
of Mexican labor to supply the war needs of 
the United States. 

San Antonio has just heard the address of 
T. A. McLean, representing the Department 
of Labor, in which he stated: 

It takes from six to ten nun behind the 
lines to keep ever}- soldier at the front, and 
with the proposed draft extensions there will 
ho an army of 6,000,000 men within a year. That 
will mean at least 36,000,000 workers behind that 
army to keep it effective. 

Altogether, the army will number about 
♦2,000,000 soldiers, industrial and military — and 
all of that out of a population of 100,000,000, 
the greater number of whom are women and 
children! What does that mean? It means that 
you business men will have to dispense with 
every unnecessary workman. 

McLean's statement and figures shot home 
to every Texan in the audience the problem 
of the border, across which lies the only 
available source of labor supply absolutely 
essential to the L'nited States during the 
war period. 

This is one of the reasons why organized 
labor has commenced a systematic campaign 
of education among the Mexicans now in this 
country, numbering over a million and a 
half. The American Eederation of Labor 
has declared in a series of conventions in 
favor of organization of Mexicans in this 
country and fraternal relations with the 
unions of Mexico. 

This great border labor crisis, affecting our 
entire country as no other labor problem 
ever affected it before, will be the matter of 
discussion, study and resolution at the In- 
ternational Conference to be held in Laredo, 
Texas, beginning November 13, between the 
representatives of the American Federation 
of Labor and the organized labor move- 
ment of Mexico. 



SHIPBUILDERS AND SEAFARERS. 



The current issue of the "Emergency Fleet 
News." published by the l'nited States Ship- 
ping Hoard Emergency Licet Corporation, 
says : 

It is the duty of every man who is an active 
participant in the shipbuilding industry to claim 
exemption from the military draft. Heads of 
shipbuilding plants should not hesitate to advise 
their workers to claim exemption and to re- 
assure them that in doing so they are not put- 
ting themselves in the "slacker" class. 

The man who shirks his job as a shipbuilder 
to day is doing just as much harm to the nation 
as the man on the battlefield who plays the 
part of a coward. 

The tendency of the average individual is to 
view this matter of claiming exemption with a 
certain amount of embarrassment. The inclina- 
tion is to feel that in asking to be excused from 
military service one is putting himself in the 
position of hesitating to do that which so many 
thousands of young Americans are doing volun- 
tarily. That is a very natural feeling but it 
docs not justify any essential war worker in 
waiving his exemption rights. 

The War Department itself urges that all who 
have a just claim to exemption put forth that 
claim. It would be a very foolish thing if we 
were to weaken one arm to strengthen another 
when both are needed in their full strength 
against the enemy. The military authorities do 
not expect to cripple very necessary war indus- 
tries at home. Obviously one of the purposes 
ni the draft is to insure that the war industries 
be maintained. 

Tn connection with the foregoing, Merchant 

Seamen of all ratings should bear in mind 



that their calling is perhaps even more essen- 
tial to the successful prosecution of the war 
than that of the shipbuilders. Without expe- 
rienced and competent seamen to man our 
-hips we would be helpless, indeed. 

President Wilson, whose timely appeal to 
men with sea experience is published on page 
1 of this issue, fully realizes the great im- 
portance of the Merchant Seaman to America. 
And his appeal emphasizes the fact that no 
seaman, now actually employed at the calling. 
can render any more patriotic service to the 
country than by sticking to his job and per- 
forming his duties effectively and efficiently. 



GUARDING UNCLE SAM'S INTERESTS 



With the vast increase in the number of 
vessels operated by the Shipping Board and 
by the transport services of the Army and 
Navy, the subject of Admiralty litigation in 
which the l'nited States is interested has 
become one of great and growing importance. 
Attorney General Gregory therefore recently 
announced that his department is giving at- 
tention to the development of a special or- 
ganization in order promptly and effectively 
to protect the interests of the Government in 
these cases. 

In accordance with this policy Mr. Ira \. 
Campbell, of San Francisco, has been ap- 
pointed a special assistant to the Attorney 
General in Admiralty matters. L T nder the 
general supervision of an Assistant Attor- 
ney General Mr. Campbell will be charged 
with the duty of co-ordinating and over- 
g the work of the Admiralty staff which 
the department is building up in the principal 
ports of this country and of arranging for 
the proper conduct of Admiralty cases which 
arise in foreign ports. 

Mr. Campbell, who is one of the leaders 
of the Admiralty bar upon the Pacific Coast, 
has been acting as Admiralty counsel to the 
Shipping Hoard, and in that position, which 
he resigns to come to the Department of 
Justice, has been intimately in touch with the 
great expansion of the American merchant 
marine which is now in progress. Lie comes 
with the highest credentials as to his char- 
acter and professional ability. 

Thus, another favorite son of San Fran- 
cisco has been honored with an appointment 
to a high and responsible post. 

Surely. San Francisco is doing her full 
-bare to help "win the war" by furnishing 
men. money and talent! 



THE HOME FRONT. 



The battle front in Europe is not the 
only American front. There is a home 
front, and our people at home should be 
as patriotic as our men in uniform in 
foreign lands. 

Every .American soldier who has fallen 
in France, every American sailor who 
has died for his country's cause has given 
his life for his people. Surely we, their 
people, can lend our money to our Nation, 
their country. 

The Fourth Liberty Loan is the fighting 
loan. Its great success will bring comfort 
and encouragement and a deep sense of 
pride to our Army and our Navy, and to 
our allies; it will bring discouragement to 
our enemies. Its success means American 
irj . I'i ussian defeat. 

The fourth loan is the fighting loan, the 
sailors and soldiers' loan. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



MONEY IN SAVINGS BANKS. 



There seems to have been a very insidious 
propaganda carried on, obviously by secret 
agents of Germany, to the effect that sav- 
ings banks deposits are to be confiscated. 
It is difficult to believe that any person in 
America would credit such a report for an 
instant. Secretary McAdoo says that the 
absurdity of these statements is manifest, 
but in order to allay the fears of a few who 
might be alarmed by such reports, he repeats 
officially that these rumors are wholly base- 
less. 

There is but one thing that will in the 
least put in danger of confiscation the sav- 
ings of the American people, whether de- 
posited in savings banks or other banks or 
invested in Liberty Bonds or any other in- 
vestments, and that one thing is a German 
victory. It is not the American Government 
that our people should fear, but the German 
Government, and with the American soldiers 
fighting as they are in France and the 
American people supporting their Govern- 
ment as they are in America, the American 
people, their liberty, their rights, and their 
savings are safe. 

The United States instead of confiscating 
or endangering the savings and other prop- 
erty of its people is defending them and 
theirs with all the irresistible might of this 
invincible Republic. 



AFTER-WAR CONDITIONS. 



FACTS ON SHIPBUILDING. 



Lord Pirrie, Controller-General of British 

Merchant Shipbuilding, has just issued a 

statement containing the following reference 

to American shipbuilding : 

"Enormous though the output of American 
shipyards promises to be in the near future, the 
demands of the American forces abroad for con- 
tinued reinforcements, and for enormous quanti- 
ties of supplies, will increase in a steadily ad- 
vancing ratio, and the time is not yet in sight 
when there will be sufficient tonnage on the 
American register to carry all these." 

In addition Lord Pirrie said that 68 of 102 
berths approved for concrete shipbuilding in 
the United Kingdom have been completed, 
and of the new and enlarged berths at ordi- 
nary yards which have been authorized to the 
number of 111, the work has now been car- 
ried out on over 25 per cent. The standard 
ship program has been extended until it rep- 
resents 74 per cent, of the total number of 
vessels laid down. Lord Pirrie also stated 
that 11 of the fabricated ships which the 
National Yards were intended to assemble 
are on the stocks in private yards. 

It is difficult for old-time* s to believe that 
the concrete ship has come to stay. But there 
surely is no doubt about the willingness of 
every maritime nation to give concrete every 
possible chance to make good. 



Saturday, October 12, is the four hundred 
and twenty-sixth anniversary of the dis- 
covery of America. President Wilson has 
proclaimed it Liberty Day and requests 
the citizens of every community in the 
United States — city, town, and country- 
side — to celebrate the day. The President, 
in his proclamation, says: 

Every day the great principles for which we 
are fighting take fresh hold upon our thought 
and purposes and make it clearer what the end 
must be and what we must do to achieve it. 
We now know more certainly than we ever 
Knew before why free men brought the great 
Nation and Government we love into existence, 
because it grows clearer and clearer what 
supreme service it is to be America's privilege 
to render to the world. 



The trouble with the man who can see no 
hope ahead of him is simply that he is headed 
the wrong way. 



The New York "Public" Has An After-the-War 

Remedy to Give Employment to All 

Labor at High Wages. 



Now that the country's military strength has 
been demonstrated, and its exercise has brought 
victory within sight, thoughtful minds are turn- 
ing to the problems of peace. At the close of the 
war the country will have six or seven million 
men under arms, with perhaps twice as many 
more devoted to their maintenance. Thus the 
advent of peace will find fifteen to twenty mil- 
lion people who have been devoting their time 
to the destruction of life and property suddenly 
called upon to seek new occupations. The prob- 
lem for statesmen and publicists is to find the 
means and opportunities for making the change. 

It is not sufficient to say that soldiers and 
workers in war industries can be restored to 
peaceful production simply by repealing the laws 
that called them to war. A vast number of these 
men and women will not and cannot go back to 
the old conditions of life any more than the 
butterfly can return to the chrysalis. Their ex- 
perience has set them to thinking. They have 
had a vision of a new social order; and they 
have dreamed of it and thought about it till 
they have come to believe it can be made a 
reality. Any plans put out by statesmen that do 
not recognize this, and at least make an attempt 
to gratify the longing, will be worse than use- 
less; they will merely delay the solution of the 
problem, and they may lead to much suffering 
and hardship. 

Instinctively the mind seeks guidance from 
the country's experience at the end of the Civil 
War. At the close of hostilities conditions were 
so ominous that European critics predicted busi- 
ness stagnation, social disorder, and the over- 
throw of democratic institutions. Yet there was 
no interruption of business, no social cataclysm; 
and the army melted away into the ranks of 
industry without a ripple of disturbance. The 
reason universally given for this remarkable 
transition from war conditions to peace is the 
fact that the country possessed a vast area of 
unoccupied land. Soldiers were given farms of 
160 acres for the mere cost of recording deeds 
that are now worth from one hundred to two 
hundred dollars an acre. Civilians were per- 
mitted to take these farms at a dollar and a 
quarter an acre. Not all soldiers went upon the 
land, but many of them did; and those who did 
not found places that had been given up by 
civilians who went from the cities of the East 
to the free land of the West. Besides, the set- 
tling up of the new country required the build- 
ing of railroads, cities, and all that goes to make 
up civilized life. But the basis of the new order 
was the fertile land of the vast public domain. 
Upon this free land a man with almost no cap- 
ital could go and make a comparatively good 
living, a living far above that of the peasantry 
of Europe, and better than what had previously 
prevailed in the older parts of the United States. 
So remarkable, indeed, was this recovery from 
the devastation of the Civil War, and so pro- 
nounced the business prosperity, that it led to 
an era of speculation, in which the price of land 
mounted so high that it led to a panic ten years 
after the war. 

This experience of the country after the close 
of the Civil War has been so vividly impressed 
upon people's minds that few persons doubt that 
the present problem could easily be met if an- 
other Mississippi Valley could be added to the 
public domain. Nor would there be any doubt if 
a new market could be found to absorb all the 
goods that our industries can produce. We can- 
not have a new Mississippi Valley added to the 
country; and any markets there may be abroad 
will be eagerly sought by other nations. But 
the lack of new territory or foreign markets 
need not leave us hopeless. Both requirements 
can be met within our own borders. Of the 
878,798,325 acres embraced in the farms of the 
United States, as shown by the Census of 1910, 
nearly one-half, or 400,346,575 acres, were unim- 
proved. If there be added to this the arid lands 
that can be irrigated, the swamp lands that can 
be drained, and the large areas held by indi- 
viduals, railroads, and other corporations, it will 
be seen that the unused arable land in' the United 
States far exceeds the amount in use. Nor does 
this by any means mark the extent of our op- 
portunities for employment. The undeveloped 
mineral and timber lands, the oil lands, and the 
water power exceed those in use. The same is 
true of cities, where the vacant and the partially 
improved lots are greater in number than the 
fully improved. Tt is apparent, therefore, that 
there is more than enough land — if it be opened 
to use — for all who will go upon it. And if the 
net yield and accessibility to market be consid- 
ered the vacant land of today will give a larger 
return to labor than that taken up in the years 
following the Civil War. 

But this is not our only means of relief. A 
potential market is at hand for all that labor 
and capital can produce on this land. And what 
is of more importance, this market is entirely 
within otir own control. If we were compelled 
to seek a market abroad we should come into 
competition with other nations as eager as we 
to sell; and if the rivalry continued as it has 
heretofore, there would be friction and misun- 
derstandings that might ultimately lead to war. 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 7, 1918. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., Ed. Andersen presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping good. Full Shipwreck Benefit 
was awarded to eight members of the crew of 
the steam-schooner "Coquille River." 

HARRY INGWARDSEN, 

Secretary pro tem. 

Maritime Hall Bldg., 59 Clay Street. Tel. 
Kearny 2228. 



St. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. 30, 1918. 
No meeting. Shipping slow; men scarce. 

J. ETCHELLS, Agent. 
Room 11, de Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 30, 1918. 
Shipping fair. 

WM. HARDY, Agent. 
58 Powell Street E. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. 
Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 30, 1918. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects fair. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 30, 1918. 
Shipping medium. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 

84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 30, 1918. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping fair. 

ED. ROSENBERG, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 30, 1918. 
Shipping good; members scarce. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
88^ Third Street. Tel. Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 30, 1918. 
Shipping good; members scarce. 

HARRY OHLSON, Agent. 
128^4 Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 23, 1918. 
Shipping good; prospects fair. 

R. H. BLACKWOOD, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 3, 1918. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Ed. Andersen in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping fair A resolution to purchase 
$2,000 of the Fourth Liberty Bond issue was de- 
clared carried. The full Shipwreck Benefit was 
ordered paid to one member wrecked on the 
steam-schooner "Coquille River." Nomination 
of officers for the ensuing term was proceeded 
with. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market Street. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 26, 1918. 
Shipping fair. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203. Phone Main 
2233. P. O. Box 214. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 25, 1918. 
No meeting. Shipping fair; few members 
ashore. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
Sepulveda Bldg., 128^ Sixth Street. Phone, 
Home 115; Sunset 66 W. 



DIED. 

Olaf Johnson, No. 162, a native of Norway, 
aye 56. Died at Alaska, 1918. 

Andrew Mardison, No. 1338, a native of Fin- 
land, age 37. Died at San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 
3, 1918. 

George Wills, No. 555. a native of Scotland, 
age 48. Died in the wreck of schooner "Bertha 
Dolbeer," January, 1918. 



Ten vessels to be launched by the United 
States Shipping Board are to be named by ten 
Pacific Coast cities that make oversubscriptions 
in the Twelfth District in the Fourth Liberty 
Loan campaign. Ten counties in the district 
will be given the honor of naming ten fighting 
tanks and choosing their sponsors. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



FACTS ABOUT ALASKA. 



What has been accomplished in survey- 
ing the waters of Alaska and what is 
needed in the way of specially adapted ves- 
sels and sufficient men for efficiently pur- 
suing the work in the future are set forth 
in a recent report, entitled "Safeguard the 
Gateways of Alaska — Her Waterways," by 
E. Lester Jones, Superintendent of the 
I'nited States Coast and Geodetic Survey. 

In a period of 50 years, declares the re- 
port, the Survey has had only $3,995,906, 
or an average annual appropriation of $79,- 
918 to expend on water surveys in the Ter- 
ritory. Nine per cent, of the water areas 
of Alaska have been surveyed in the past 
31 years, 91 per cent, remaining unsurveyed 
at the present time. 

The following is an excerpt from the 
report : 

"From 1867 to 1917 there have been ap- 
proximately 425 vessels wrecked in Alas- 
kan waters, with a loss of about 500 lives. 
Among these vessels were large sailing 
crafts as well as freight and passenger ves- 
sels, also some Government vessels. 

"When we stop to think for a moment 
of this enormous loss, and consider alone 
that the National Government has suffered 
the loss of three splendid vessels worth 
more than $1,000,000. the serious side of 
the question is emphasized, especially when 
we think how much could have been done 
with this money if it had been applied in 
surveying the waters of Alaska. 

"While it should not be understood that 
all these disasters have been caused by lack 
ot" proper sailing charts and lack of knowl- 
edge of currents, it can be said that the 
greater portion of the wrecks have been 
directly due to the lack of accurate nautical 
information which can be furnished by 
proper surveys. 

"The history of the industrial develop- 
ment of Alaska shows that, almost without 
exception, the establishment of industries 
and commerce has preceded, rather than 
followed, the surveys of the locality and 
that their establishment and development 
have been greatly retarded and ofttimes en- 
tirely suspended by the lack of such sur- 
veys. 

"The exports from Alaska for the past 
50 years have amounted to about $708,000,- 
000, reaching a high-water mark the past 
year of about $94,709,359, and this does not 
include, of course, the great amount of fish, 
lumber, and other products of the Territory 
that has been consumed by its population. 

"The imports to Alaska for the past 50 
years have amounted to $412,400,000, reach- 
ing the high-water mark in 1917, $44,431,- 
600. These figures show briefly the enor- 
mous amount of.shipping necessarv to han- 
dle this large amount of trade. 

"For the first 30 years after the purchase 
of Alaska by the United States a few small 
vessels only were required for the com- 
merce between Alaska ports and the ports 
on the Pacific Coast of continental United 
States. In 1917 there were not only 3963 
vessels, with a tonnage of 1,818,312, enter- 
ing and clearing Alaska, but instead of 
being vessels of 10 or 12 feet draft, as were 
the earlier ones, we now have them up to 
28 feet. In other words, when the work 
of the Coast and Geodetic Survey is at its 
lowesl ebb there. Alaska's prosperity is 
greater than ever before. 

"Few people realize or even think of the 
Territory's enormous area. From Dixon 



Entrance, on the international boundary 
line, to the farthest Attu Island, it is nearly 
3000 miles. Along this stretch of coast 
there are about 465 islands in Alaska con- 
taining one or more square miles, and in- 
numerable smaller ones. The longest island 
is Prince of Wales, 131 miles long and 39 
miles wide, while Kodiak Island has the 
largest area, 101 miles long and 63 miles 
wide — equal to the combined areas of Con- 
necticut and Rhode Island. 

"The total area of Alaska is 586,400 square 
miles, or nearly twice the size of the orig- 
inal 13 States of the Union. To this we 
can add seven other States east of the Mis 
sissippi River and still we do not have the 
amount of area in Alaska. Norway, Swe- 
den, Finland, England, Scotland and Ireland 
do not contain as much territory as Alaska. 
Germany, France and Spain have only a 
trifle more area than this Territory. 

"As to the water areas. Alaska has 26,000 
miles of coast line, or about o.OOO miles 
more than the entire Atlantic, Gulf and 
Pacific coasts of continental United States. 

"If the map of Alaska is placed over that 
of continental United States, with the town 
of Ketchikan fin the southeastern corner 
of Alaska) on Jacksonville, Fla., the west- 
ern island of the Aleutian Group will be 
found at Santa Barbara, in California. 

"Alaska's high mountains have their snow 
fields and glaciers. They are the loftiest 
and greatest in North America and cover 
a broad expanse of area. On the other 
hand, Alaska has wide areas of valley lands, 
timber, and has many varieties of climate, 
as varied as can be found in the Eastern 
or Middle States, controlled largely by the 
number of mountain ranges, also by the 
Pacific Ocean, which has the same effect 
on the climate of Alaska as the Atlantic 
Ocean has on Great Britain and Norway. 

"Although Alaska has been in our pos- 
session for a half century, ignorance of its 
varied climate has been widespread, as has 
also the general misunderstanding of its 
winters. It has led to not a few blunders 
both in the administration of the Territory 
and also in plans for its investigation and 
development. Many people to this day 
speak of it as the land of ice and snow 
and few realize that part of this Territory 
has a temperate climate. 

"The permanent snow and ice fields of 
Alaska are situated on the mountain 
slopes, as they are on the Swiss Alps, and 
cover only a very small percentage of the 
total area. 

"In comparing Alaska with other coun- 
tries of similar latitude and climate a close 
relationship is found to Finland, a country 
of considerable agricultural importance. 
Finland and Alaska are largely included 
between the parallels 58 degrees and 70 
degrees north latitude. Alaska is bordered 
on the north by the Arctic Ocean, and 
Finland nearly touches the Arctic. The 
cultivated area in Finland comprised about 
7,000,000 acres in 1901, while Alaska is 
supposed to have 64,000,000 acres of land 
available for agricultural pursuits, including 
grazing. In one recent year Finland pro- 
duced 36,731,660 bushels of grain. 29,887,- 
398 bushels of potatoes, and other market- 
able farm products. The output of butter 
for one year amounted to 26,585,600 pound?. 
Finland exported in one year $S,679,400 
worth of live animals, meat, game, and but- 
ter products, and $46.012,(X>O worth of wood 
pulp, paper, and manufactures of wood. 
These figures are given simply to show 



what a country similar to Alaska is pro- 
ducing on one-ninth of the available land.'' 



SEIZED SHIPYARD LAYS KEEL. 



A German-owned shipyard in the I'nited 
States laid its first keel for the new Ameri- 
can merchant marine on September 28. 
This event took place at St. Andrew's Hay, 
Millville, Florida. The company, known as 
the American Lumber Company, has been 
taken over by Alien Property Custodian A. 
Mitchell Palmer, and is now under Ameri- 
can management. 

Chairman Hurley of the Shipping Board 
wired President William P. Wilson of the 
Board of Directors as follows: 

"I regret exceedingly that the press of 
business will prevent my being with you at 
the laying of your first keel. This is an 
occasion of unusual interest, and I would 
be glad to assist all I can in bringing this 
ceremony to the attention of the American 
people." 

The invitation from the representative of 
the Alien Property Custodian to Chairman 
Hurley had this to say: 

"I am very anxious to show you per- 
sonally that what Mr. Palmer is doing to 
turn this German-owned industry into ves- 
sels for Uncle Sam and also to show you 
the tremendous possibilities of St. Andrews 
Bay which the Germans discovered twenty 
years ago, and which Mr. Palmer is now 
bringing to the attention of the country." 



AN INSIDIOUS ATTACK. 



"The Republican Publicity Association, 
which is collecting $1,500,000 from manu- 
facturers to take Congress away from the 
President," says the Providence News, "has 
begun its campaign of vilification in a 
statement sent broadcast, accusing the 
President and the Democratic party of 
using the war as a mask to find jobs in 
the Labor Department for men who cannot 
find work elsewhere. 

"The Republican attack is published with 
the title, 'Under the Robe of War,' and in- 
sinuates that the Administration is black- 
jacking Congress into voting money for al- 
leged war purposes, when the real intent 
is to find jobs for the faithful. No Re- 
publican Senator would dare stand spon- 
sor for this scurrilous attack upon the 
President and the Labor Department, but 
the Publicity Association is used to make 
it over the signature of Jonathan Bourne, 

Jr. 

"The real trouble is that this money will 
be expended by bureaus in every State to 
provide labor for factories. Big employers, 
after August 1, will have to take men sent 
by the several State bureaus, instead of 
men hired by strike-breaking agencies. The 
effort of the Government to bring labor 
and employer together without the assist- 
ance of outside agencies is denounced as 
a political steal. Under the new method 
no man need leave his State to find a job. 
Tt will be found for him by the Govern- 
ment during the term of the war. This is 
what is called graft by the Republican gen- 
tlemen, who, under the lead of Will Hays, 
of Indiana, have started out to get con- 
trol of Congress. 

"This is only the first attack in many 
planned on the patient man in the White 
House and his associates, wdio are working 
out the problems of the war. The stupid 
people behind the scheme will hear from 
the American people in November." 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



APPRECIATION OF FURUSETH. 



Editor, Ska. men's Journal: 

[n reading the portions of the speech of 
Mr. Frank P. Walsh, quoted in a recent 
issue of the Seamen's Journal, concerning 
our respected leader, Mr. Furuseth, a thought 
came to me which I desire to put before the 
readers of this paper. 

Everything that Mr. Walsh said about Mr. 
Furuseth is true, and much more. For the 
iast ten years I have been closely identified 
with the enforcement of rights of seamen 
and have sought to find remedies for the evils 
affecting him and his vocation. 

I was first identified with a semi-charitable 
institution, The Legal Aid Society, the pur- 
poses of which were good and which, while 
I was attorney in charge of its seamen's 
branch, I am sure, did considerable to right 
the wrongs of seamen and enforce their 
rights. I have had an opportunity to observe 
the workings of various church societies and 
other eleemosynary organizations, who have 
attempted to assuage the wounds of the suf- 
fering seamen. I have studied their methods, 
I have observed the operation of various 
committees and executives appointed by city 
and State governments for the purpose of 
controlling shipping masters and boarding 
masters. 

I have observed the efforts of the LJnited 
States attorneys to enforce various statutes 
of Congress, intended to prohibit crimping, 
etc. In fact, have assisted United States at- 
torneys in the preparation of many cases in 
the city of New York. Various kinds of 
legislation and methods were suggested by 
these organizations and some of them made 
recommendations to Congress on the subject, 
but infinitely more good has been accom- 
plished by the seamen's unions of the United 
States under the leadership of Andrew Furu- 
seth in obtaining the passage of the Seamen's 
Act, abolishing involuntary services and in 
giving to seamen of all ships coming to our 
ports, the right to demand a certain portion 
of their wages and throwing the courts of 
the United States open to the enforcement 
of the act, than has been accomplished dur- 
ing the past three centuries at least, by all 
of the eleemosynary institutes, municipal, 
State and Federal Governments combined. 

This may sound like a big statement and it 
is, but if I know anything about the history 
and development of the Merchant Marine of 
the United States and other nations; if I 
know anything about the conditions which 
have brought about the condition of involun- 
tary servitude and its attending evils in which 
the seaman has lived for the last sixty years, 
then this statement is not extravagant. 

So much for his accomplishments. As a 
man of brains, he ranks among the first of 
his generation. There are few men in the 
United States who possess and have used 
the acumen, foresight, tact and tenacity of 
purpose possessed, and demonstrated by him. 
His struggle for recognition of the rights of 
seamen commenced years ago. 

As stated by Mr. Walsh, for twenty years 
he labored at Washington, educating our 
Congressmen and Senators on the importance 
of a Merchant Marine. At last he made them 
understand. The Seamen's Act is the result. 
His labor has been performed under the 
greatest of difficulties and his accomplish- 
ments have been complete. Tie has attained 
the goal for which he was striving. 

No man possesses to a greater degree the 
qualities of integrity, honor and ability of the 



all-around American quality, than Mr. Furu- 
seth. He is the embodiment of the spirit of 
liberty and true democracy in which this 
nation was conceived. He is deserving of the 
greatest honor. 

I have no doubt that after Andrew Furu- 
seth has passed away, the great American 
people, then being in possession as they un- 
doubtedly will be, of a tremendous Merchant 
Marine, turning back the pages of history 
will discover what an important part in its 
development was played by Andrew Furuseth. 
They will desire to erect some visible monu- 
ment to his greatness and the greatness of 
his work. 

There has been a tendency of late years 
to give recognition to artists and leaders 
while they are still alive to enjoy the honor 
that is due them. I am one who believes that 
such recognition should be given to Andrew 
Furuseth while he is still alive. I saw him 
just the other day and I believe he will live 
for quite a time as he is apparently in excel- 
lent health. 

I am writing this letter for the purpose of 
inviting members of the seamen's unions, 
delegates and others, to write me and express 
their opinion on the proposition of taking up 
a subscription from seamen in sums from one 
to five dollars, to be put into a fund, which 
might be called the Furuseth Memorial Fund 
or something of that sort. 

When sufficient funds are raised, a proper 
statue of Mr. Andrew Furuseth can be erected 
at New York or San Francisco, or both 
places. Permission of the authorities of the 
city of New York will probably be obtained 
for the erection of such a monument in 
Coenties Slip or on South Street, New York. 
The funds could be sent direct to some trust 
company. 

I have not consulted Mr. Furuseth about 
this proposition for I know that he would 
say "No." It seems to me, however, that if 
the seamen of the world who do know his 
work and who were benefited by his efforts, 
desire to do something to express their ap- 
preciation of him and his work, that nothing 
on earth can prevent them from doing it. 

I shall await with interest replies to this 
communication. 

Respectfully yours, 

Silas Bl.\ke Axtell. 

New York, Sept. 30, 1918. 



ARMY UNITS. 



AN AUGUST CONCEPTION. 



Samuel Taylor Coleridge, poet and essay- 
ist, writing some 75 years ago, said : 

"The possible destiny of the United 
States of America as a Nation of a hun- 
dred million of free men, stretching from 
the Atlantic to the Pacific, living under the 
laws of Alfred and speaking the language 
of Shakespeare and Milton, is an august 
conception." 

The United States is now a Nation of a 
hundred million and more, stretching from 
the Atlantic to the Pacific, and reaching 
out east takes in Hawaii and the Philip- 
pines, in the north Alaska, and in the 
south the Panama Canal. But grander 
than its physical is its moral greatness. Its 
fairness and justice, its courage and power, 
its maintenance of right and freedom cover 
the world. 

The destiny the United States is now 
fulfilling is a more august conception than 
even the imagination of the author of 
Kubla Khan conceived of less than a cen- 
tury ago. 



Some knowledge of army facts and figures 
is almost essential now-a-days and it is well 
to know that 

An army corps is 60,000 men. 

An infantry division is 19,000 men. 

An infantry brigade is 7,000 men. 

A regiment of infantry is 3,000 men. 

A battalion is 1,600 men. 

A company is 250 men. 

A platoon is 60 men. 

A corporal's guard is 11 men. 

A field battery has 195 men. 

A supply train has 283 men. 

A machine gun battalion has 296 men. 

An engineer's regiment has 1,098 men. 

An ambulance company has 66 men. 

A field hospital has 55 men. 

A major general heads field army and also 
each army corps. 

A brigadier general heads each infantry 
brigade. 

A colonel heads each regiment. 

A lieutenant colonel is next in rank below 
a colonel. 

A major heads each battalion. 

A captain heads each company. 

A lieutenant heads a platoon. 

A sergeant is next below a lieutenant. 

A corporal is a squad officer. 



Labor's Economic Platform 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor dis- 
putes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight 
hours per day on all Federal, State or municipal 
work, and not less than the prevailing per diem 
wage rate of the class of employment in the 
vicinity where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man-suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or 
compartments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain. 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



corn broom makers in New York City 
were organized, their wages were from $12 
to $18 a week. Xow a signed agreement 

calls i'or rates ranging from $40 to $55 a 
week, with the work week reduced from 
to 50 hours. In Chicago a 100 per 
cent, organization has raised wages $1.80 
a day fur eight hours. The old rate was 
$4.20 and the new one is $6. "We also 
secured an agreement for all helpers, with 
$12 a week for new girls and 10 to 20 
per cent, increase for all now working in 
the factories," writes Boyer. "Under our 
old system of low dues and small per 
capita tax, this would be impossible." 



Urge Organization. 

Officers of the. American Federation of 
Labor have called the attention of all af- 
filiates to a resolution passed by the last 
convention instructing the Executive Coun- 
cil "to plan and carry into effect the most 
intensive campaign of organization within 
its power, and urge and aid all interna- 
tional, State and central bodies to do like- 
wise." 

At its recent meeting the Executive 
Council directed officers at headquarters 
to carry into effect the above instructions. 
Acting President Alpine and Secretary 
Frank Morrison now urge affiliates to exert 
every possible effort to conform to the de- 
clarations and recommendations of the con- 
vention. "Everything within our power," 
it is stated, "has been done and will con- 
tinue to be done through the assistance 
and co-operation of the limited number of 
special organizers in the employ of the 
American Federation of Labor to carry on 
an active organizing campaign in as ex- 
tensive a territory as is possible under 
existing conditions and circumstances. Our 
very best efforts are being put forth to 
organize the workers in the steel industry." 



Extravagant Claims Cause Labor Shifts. 

The United States Employment Service 
Bulletin tells these instances of how em- 
ployers are responsible for the costly labor 
turnover that is hampering war production : 

"Several months ago a large corporation 
near Philadelphia inserted large adver- 
tisements in Ohio newspapers offering cer- 
tain classes of workmen a little higher 
than the normal wage then prevalent in 
I )hio, and added, 'and double time for 
Sundays and holidays ; plenty of overtime 
all the time.' 

"Hundreds of men left war manufactur- 
ing jobs in Central and Northern Ohio 
and paid their way to this plant. A very 
large number of them were of crafts not 
led by the plant, although the 
advertisement had called for them. These 
men were turned away. They had thrown 
up jobs on war work. They had lost many 
days and wasted considerable sums upon 
travel and subsistence. Many of them were 
left destitute and hundreds drifted into 
nearby cities, broken in spirit and em- 
bittered against the- Government and our 
country. 

"For several weeks the municipal au- 
thorities of these cities were compelled to 
feed and lodge large numbers of these 
broken men, and there is good reason to 
fear that many of them have become 
casual workers. Those who were actuallv 



hired found the promise of 'plenty of over- 
time' was not kept, while the locally im- 
possible housing conditions and living 
costs soon disgusted and drove them out 
to seek more congenial even if nominally 
less-well-paid employment. 

"An enterprising labor agent of a Gov- 
ernment plant in the South, desiring to 
build up his organization, hired a brass 
band and sent it in a motor truck to visit 
points frequented by negro farm hands on 
Saturday nights. Torchlights, promises of 
a month's annual leave with pay, and a 
little fervid oratory built up his needed 
force quite rapidly. It also shut down 
about seventy-five square miles of farms." 



Want Auto Truck Drivers. 

The War Department lias created a 
motor transport corps which will control 
all motor vehicles in the army. Each 
American army will require 154.747 men, 
and by the time 4,000,000 troops are landed 
in France nearly 500,000 nun will be en- 
gaged in motor transport work. At the 
present time the corps has an averag 
1500 trucks working in convoy trains in 
this country and they travel an approxi- 
mate distance of 100,000 miles every 
twenty-four hours. These trucks do not 
include those employed in army posts and 
cantonments and carry freight from every 
section of the country. In France they 
are doing similar service. 

Men qualified to drive motor vehicles 
are needed by the thousands, and the War 
Department asks those interested to write 
to the chief of motor transport corps al 
Washington for information. This also 
applies to men who now have deferred 
classification. 



WATCH THESE ISLANDS. 



The announcement is made that the Japa- 
nese government has decided to institute 
civil administration in the South Pacific 
islands now under Japanese military occu- 
pation. Simply as a temporary measure of 
administration, this is of course very proper. 
The islands can be administered with less 
trouble by civil than by military officials. 
But as the beginning of a system which 
may easily become permanent it is a chal- 
lenge to the attention of America. 

These are precisely the islands in the 
Pacific which ought to belong to the United 
States. They would have been acquired 
at the same time as the Philippines except 
for a piece of sharp practice on the part of 
the Spanish commissioners, who pretended 
they were not for sale and then proceeded 
to sell them to Germany as soon as the 
treat v was signed. We, of course, lost our 
rights to them then, unless this incident may 
be held to constitute a residuary option of 
purchase. And no one has any right to 
them now except Japan. 

They are, however, of no strategic value 
and of very little commercial value to Japan, 
while they are of great strategic value and 
of some incidental commercial value to us. 
They are precisely the islands which domi- 
nate the route from Hawaii to the Philip- 
pines. We could therefore afford to pay 
for them a price in money or in kind which 
Japan could very well afford to accept. We 
could afford to surrender American Samoa 
to Fngland in order to clear the condition 
in the Pacific south of the equator for unin- 
terrupted British or Australian occupation. 



and Japan could afford, for a consideration, 
to clear the Pacific tropics north of the 
equator on the pathway between Honolulu 
and Manila for us. That consideration could 
be in money, to cover Japan's expenses in 
taking and holding the islands, and it could 
be, by the consent of all the Allies, in land 
in Manchuria or elsewhere, where it would 
give opportunity for Japanese expansion. 
At any rate American statesmen ought not 
to lack the foresight which Japanese states- 
men are showing in making preparations for 
the future of these small but strategically 
important islands. — Fresno Republican. 



AFTER-WAR CONDITIONS. 
(Continued from Page 7.) 



But a market within the country can be created 
that will be entirely free from these dangers. 
This home market is not to be developed by 
shutting out foreign goods, as protectionists 
have proposed, but by increasing the consuming 
power of our people. 

It is a matter of common knowledge that as 
man's income grows his expenditures increase. 
The experience of the immigrant in this country 
is typical. Without capital, ignorant of the lan- 
guage and ways of the country, and accustomed 
to a lower scale of living, he accepts the com- 
monest labor at the lowest wages. He crowds 
his family into one or two rooms in as dilapi- 
dated a building as the city will permit to stand, 
and gives them the cheapest food and clothes. 
His household furnishings are pitiably meager 
and comfortless. That this condition is due to 
necessity and not to choice is evident from the 
fact that no sooner has his income increased, 
through greater efficiency and the aid of his 
children, than he moves to a larger apartment. 
As his income continues to grow he moves to a 
better neighborhood, furnishes his home with 
comforts, and supplies his family with better 
food and clothing. The younger members seek 
more education and acquire a culture and refine- 
ment that were denied their parents. This is 
not a rare exception; it is the rule. As the la- 
borer's wages rise his expenditures multiply. 

Here is the market for the products of the 
labor that will be made available at the close of 
the war. Health boards tell of vast numbers 
of under-nourished school children. Settlement 
workers show how many families are in want of 
sufficient food and clothing. And social surveys 
have laid bare the mean and abject conditions 
of countless families in city, town and country. 
Above these are more families who though 
bli ssed with the necessaries of life would appre- 
ciate the simpler luxuries. These potential de- 
mands become actual the moment wages are in- 
1. But how shall this be done? 
A builder may say: "I will put up new apart- 
ment houses on this vacant land; then these 
families living in one or two rooms will have 
comfortable homes. The material I use will help 
business, and the men I employ will distribute 
wages." But the lot that has lain unused for 
years is owned by a man who demands a price 
so high that the builder would have to pay 
- lower than workmen will accept, or charge 
a rental higher than poor families can pay. And 
the building is not put up. An engineer may 
say: "I wiil develop this water power, and fur- 
nish a force so cheap that all products can be 
sold at lower prices, which will increase con- 
sumption and multiply the demand for labor." 
Rut he finds the unused water power is owned 
by some one who asks an impossible price. A 
capitalist may say: "I will develop this mineral 
land, and supply more coal, iron, or copper; it 
will employ labor and furnish cheaper materials 
for other industries." But the undeveloped min- 
eral lands are owned by some one who demands 
a forbidding price. An unemployed workman 
may say: "I will till a bit of this unused farm 
land, and raise some food for those hungry city 
families as well as for myself." But when he 
attempts to apply his idea he finds that the un- 
used land belongs to a man who asks for it 
more than it is worth. So he goes into the labor 
market and depresses wages, while the hungry 
children remain unfed. 

There is only one thing necessary to give em- 
tent to all labor at high wages, and satisfy 
all reasonable wants: Put to use the idle lots, 
mineral lands, and farm lands. This cannot be 
done under present conditions. The price is pro- 
hibitive, and every increase in demand raises the 
price. 

What are the statesmen, publicists, and leaders 
of public opinion going to do to meet the situ- 
ation? — The Public. 



A health and efficiency campaign is being 
conducted among the shipyards of Portland by 
the health and sanitation section of the United 
States Shipping Board. This work looks toward 
sanitation in the yards, in housing quarters, and 
:ilso guards against the social evil, the Shipping 
Board holding that fitness of men physically is 
as necessary in the shipyards as in the Army. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



ROUGH TREATMENT. 



Editor, Seamen's Journal: 

.On September 3, four union men (Larsen, 
Scully, Petersen and Maclnnis) and two 
Inited States Shipping Board men signed 
articles as A. B.'s to go to Quebec, Canada, 
In join the S.S. "Lake Pearl" and bring her 
to Boston. We left Boston that night at 8:30, 
arriving aboard the ship on the following day. 
The crew that brought this ship down from 
the Lakes was paid off after we got on board 
and we learned that coming down from the 
Lakes she carried two wheelsmen and six 
deck hands. This was subsequently borne out 
by her inspection certificate which called for 
eight seamen. The two Shipping Board men 
were made quartermasters, leaving us four 
union men to do the deck work. Before 
heaving up that evening we went to the mate 
and told him we were short-handed and asked 
him if he would pay the customary short- 
hand money. He said he would. On Septem- 
ber 5 the ship anchored off Fathers Point, 
Quebec. When the afternoon watch (Larsen 
and Maclnnis) went on deck the mate or- 
dered them into the coal bunkers to trim 
coal, and when they refused he threatened 
them with handcuffs. They went into the 
bunkers and trimmed coal for three hours. 
There was no shortage in the fireroom force, 
and as the ship was anchored it is hard to 
understand this action of this mate. 

On September 6 Ole Larsen was so sick 
he couldn't turn to, Maclnnis keeping the 
watch on deck during the day and the look- 
out at night. On September 7, afternoon 
watch, while keeping lookout on bridge the 
mate ordered Maclnnis into bunkers to trim 
coal. He worked about half an hour when 
he had to knock off as he was feeling ill. 
We arrived at Sydney, Cape Breton, on Sun- 
day forenoon, the 8th, and anchored. By this 
time three seamen, a quartermaster, an oiler 
and two firemen were under the weather. 
We asked for a doctor. We helped to dock 
the ship early that afternoon. Larsen was 
not fit to go on deck, but he went. That 
night at 9 o'clock the second mate ordered us 
to turn to and take off hatches. We refused, 
as the three of us were too sick. Monday, 
the 9th, we were unable to turn to. The doc- 
tor came aboard in the morning and looked 
us over. Scully's body was broken out in a 
sort of rash. The doctor gave Larsen a few 
pills and Maclnnis some medicine. Nothing 
was done for Scully. Tuesday, the 10th, at 
5 o'clock in the morning, the captain came 
aft to turn us to. He said he had a letter 
from the doctor stating that two of us (Lar- 
sen and Maclnnis) were not sick, but Scully 
was. We asked him why the doctor had 
given us medicine if we were not sick and 
had not given any attention to Scully, who 
was very sick. The captain made all kinds 
of threats as to what he would do to us if 
we didn't turn to and get the ship ready for 
sea. Maclnnis turned to first and then 
Larsen. Larsen was a very sick man and 
should not have been ^compelled to work. 
That night while at sea the quartermaster 
was taken bad and Maclnnis took his trick 
at wheel from midnight until 4 and the 8 
to 12 morning of Wednesday, the 11th. We 
arrived at Halifax that afternoon. On Thurs- 
day, the 12th. a United States Navy doctor 
came aboard and ordered Seaman Larsen and 
Quartermaster Slinger ashore to the hospital. 
He told Scully that he had had the measles. 
Bear in mind that Larsen was one of those 
whom the doctor in Sydney said was not sick. 



With the loss of these two men we now had 
only four men on deck. We left Halifax that 
evening and arrived at Searsport, Me., just 
before noon on Saturday, the 14th, and an- 
chored. One of the firemen was taken from 
the ship and sent to a hospital in Belfast, 
Me., where he died the following day. He 
also was one of those whom the doctor in 
Sydney said was not sick. On Tuesday, the 
17th, the ship docked and Seamen Scully, 
Petersen and Maclnnis claimed their dis- 
charge. The mate then refused to pay them 
the short-hand money which in Quebec he 
said would be paid. 

The captain's name is Albert Smith. The 
ship is operated by the Coastwise Transpor- 
tation Company. 

Alexander S. MacInnis, 
Member of Eastern and Gulf Sailors' 
Association. 

Boston, Mass., Sept. 27, 1918. 



MAMMON IS MERCILESS. 



Speaking of the Supreme Court decision 
declaring the so-called anti-child labor law 
unconstitutional, the New Republic re- 
marked : 

"Whatever the comparative force of the 
two opinions (majority and minority) the 
effect of the majority decision adverse to 
the law cannot fail to be injurious both to 
the welfare of the American people and 
to the prestige of the Supreme Court." 

In passing it might be said that a study 
of the history of Supreme Court decisions 
would at least have spared commentators 
like the able New Republic any surprise. 
The Drcd Scott, Danbury Hatters and like 
decrees, for example. The recent decision 
re-establishes the sacredness of States' 
rights and with these rights go the con- 
tinued privilege of the posterity of a slave 
oligarchy to exploit and stunt childhood 
of America. Sedition laws protect the 
Supreme Court from criticism. But as five 
members of this august body by their de- 
cision put "States' rights" on one side of 
the "scales of justice," we should at least 
be permitted to remind these jurists of a 
picture that hangs on the other side. 

The chapter, "The Crimson in Cotton" 
in the book entitled "Children in Bondage," 
is eloquent in its description of conditions 
that make laymen hot with indignation. 
Read it : 

"For a day or a night at a stretch an 
army of unprotected little ones do some 
one monotonous thing — abusing their eyes 
. . . dwarfing their muscles . . . befoul- 
ing their lungs by breathing flecks of fly- 
ing cotton. . . . And these are not the 
children of recent immigrants hardened by 
the effete conditions of foreign servitude. 
Nor are they negro children who have 
shifted their shackles from field to mill. 
They are white children of old and pure 
colonial stock. Think of it! Here is a 
people that has outlived the bondage of 
England ; that has seen the rise and fall of 
slavery — a people . . . that must see their 
latest born drag on in a base servility that 
reminds us of the Saxon churl under the 
frown of the Norman lord. For Mammon 
is merciless." 

The book is compiled by Judge Ben 
Lindsey, Edward Markham, the poet, and 
George Creel and its contents taken from 
Government and State records. It is a 
piri nre of America's shame regarding the 
welfare of its children. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Page 5.) 
LAKE DISTRICT— (Continued). 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

Branches: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, 111 4 E. Austin Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, Mich 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, Wis 309 Tower Avenu« 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

TOLEDO, Ohio 821 Summit Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 

Headquarters: • 

Buffalo, N. Y., 35 West Eagle Street, 

Telephone Seneca 896. 

J. M. SECOND, Secretary. 

Branches: 

CHICAGO, 111 406 N. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND, Ohio 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio 85 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, Oh»y 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, Ohio 821 Summit Street 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. T 152 Main Street 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 
Marine Hospitals: 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 



Relief 
Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. T. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludlngton, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 
Erie, Pa. 
Menominee. Mich. 



Stations: 
Ogdensburg, N. T. 
Oswego, N. T. 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 69 Clay Street 

Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C 1424 Government Street 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 1365 

TACOMA, "Wash 2016 North 30th Street 

SEATTLE, Wash.. 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 66 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box « 

PORTLAND, Ore 88% 3rd Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 87 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 314 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 68 Commercial Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 64 Pike St. Viaduct, P. O. Box 876 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal.. 613 Beacon Street, P. O. Box 674 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 

PORTLAND, Ore 98 Second Street N 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 64 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 42 

ASTORIA, Ore. P. O. Box 1SI 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC. 

Headquarters. 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C). Canada P. O. Box 968 

KKTCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
ASTORIA. Ore P. O. Box 111 



12 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Labor News 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Colored musicians in Baltimore 
have organized and are affiliated 
with the bona fide trade union 
movement. 

Foundry employers of Marion, 
Ohio, have refused the wapic demand 
of Iron Molders' Union No. 386 and 
have also refused to arbitrate the 
question. Now the men are on strike 
and the employers talk of "interfer- 
ing with war production" because 
these workers demand rates that will 
meet increased living costs. 

The Utah State Federation of 
Labor convention declared for a 
women's minimum wage law. Officers 
were instructed to urge legislation 
that would prevent private insurance 
companies from selling liability in- 
surance in Utah. Private employ- 
ment agencies were condemned and 
the law making body will be asked 
to legislate them out of existence. 
The attempts of certain interests 
to curb a free press were con- 
demned by the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor convention. 
Equal pay for women where they 
do the same work as men was 
urged and Congress will be asked 
to provide railroad mail clerks with 
a standard work day. A conference 
of central bodies will be called in 
the near future to discuss after-the- 
war problems. 

According to the Labor Review a 
bunch of non-union street car men 
have broken all records. When the 
union car men struck this handful 
of company men stayed in. The 
strikers won and the National War 
Labor Board awarded them wage 
increases, which included the non- 
unionists, who accepted the raise 
and then asked the labor board not 
to recognize the Street Car Men's 
Union. 

Members of the Typographical 
Union employed in commercial shops 
at Detroit, Mich., have received the 
big end of an arbitration award and 
their wages are increased from $25 
to $29 a week. The union first 
demanded a 25 per cent, increase. 
The employers granted a 5 per cent, 
raise and agreed to arbitrate the re- 
maining 20 per cent, difference. The 
printers accepted and Judge Wilkins, 
with his 16 per cent, award, nearly 
approached the typos' original de- 
mand. 

Organized moving picture opera- 
tors in Los Angeles are charged 
with "hampering the war." The- 
atrical managers want to employ 
women, thereby releasing: man 
power, but the operators, they say, 
object. Now the operators are un- 
kind enough to expose these "pa- 
triotic" managers by showing that 
they would employ the women at a 
lower rate and without any appren- 
ticeship, to the danger of every one 
in these theaters, as proved by fre- 
quent fires in houses where amateur 
operators are employed. 

The Best Steel and Casting Com- 
pany at Stonehurst, Cal., has granted 
the eight-hour day, wage increases 
and double time for overtime to its 
foundry employes. Wages of casting 
chippers are advanced 55 cents a 
day. The company made these 
prants when over 100 of its em- 
ployes joined the Foundry Em- 
ployes' Union No. 54. Many of 
these workers were former members 
of the union but accepted their em- 
ployer's promise to "protect their 
interests." It seems that the com- 
pany has been busy with other 
matters and the workers concluded 
to help themselves. 



Offloe Phone Elliott 11M 



Established 1890 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Un-to-Date Method* In Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 
COMPASSES ADJUSTED 

Next to U. S. Steamship Inspectors' Office 
8EATTLE, WASH. 



500-1 SECURITIES BLDQ. 



QUESTIONNAIRES. 

Members whose questionnaires are ad- 
vertised in this column should, in order 
to comply with the military regulations, 
immediately notify S. A. Silver, Sailors 
Union, 59 Clay Street, San Francisco, to 
forward same to the port of their des- 
tination. 

Aalta, Albert Kallasman, Edward 

Aalta. Henry E. J. 

Abrahamson, A. W. Larson, Fingal 
Anderson, Sven Lolne. Frank L.. 

Anker, Lars Lorenzo, Bruno 

Axelsen. J. H. Ludwlg, Nils H. 

Baardsen. Hans M. Lundstrom. E. W. 
Behne, William A. Luse, John 
Bergstrom. John E. Makla. Anden 
Bowma. Jan Mathiesen, Axel 

Burg John Mortenson, Adolf 

Byglin O. O. Nielson, Hans 

Carlsen. H. C. Nilsson, Nils II. 

Carlson, Elnar G. Olsen, Nlcolai 
Castro. Julian F. Olsen, Clalo 
Christiansen, Hans Olsen. Mandlus 

p. Olsen, Angar M. 

Chr'istensen, Louis Olsen, Ragnar 
Eliasson, J. E. Olson, Knut 

Ellison. Morris Ostergard, Frank 

Erickson, Alf. Pederson, C. E. 

Erisen, John Peterson, Conrad 

Eugene, John Pettersen. Elnar E. 

Greenitz, John Rasmussen. R. H. 

Grondahl, Armas W. Rasmussen. L. A. 
Gumdeross, Hans C. Renwal, Anselm 
Hansen. Johannsen Rod, Sakarias 
Hansen, B. P. A. Roed, Hjalmar 
Hansen, Hans M. Rotter, Jack 
Hendrikson, Nick Rontved, O. J. 
Henrikson, Henry Schippman, H. C. 
Hermann, Carl E. Slge, Herman 
Impinen, Frank F. Stovner, Anders S. 
Jacobson, Alexander Strasdin, Paul 

R. Tanum. Helga 

Jansson, Karl H. "Van Keppel, Jo- 
Jansen, Bernh. Wall, Alfred 

Jensen, Frank Wamser, Christian 

Ten sen, Henry Wilcke, J. W. O. 

Tnhnsen, Carl G. Wllhelmson, John 
Knoop, Jan Zwart. A. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



Mercantile Lunch 

Is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy & Haakon's 

Proprietors 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

612 Fourth Street - Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNQ 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers in Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER &. HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIO STORES 

Store No. 1 — Cor. Main and First 

Store No. 2— Westlake and Pine 

SEATTLE 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Creamatory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH 
Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor In New York Nautical College. 
Room 4140 ARCADE BUILDING 
Third Floor, First Avenue Side 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP, 
MANAGEMENT, CIRCULATION, ETC., 
REQUIRED BY THE ACT OF CON- 
GRESS OF AUGUST 24, 1912, 

<■>' The Seamen's Journal, published week- 
ly at San Francisco, Cal., for October 
1, 1918. 

State of California, 
County of San Francisco — ss. 

Before me, a Notary Public In and for 
the State and county aforesaid, person- 
ally appeared S. A. Silver, who, having 
been duly sworn according to law, de- 
poses and says that he is the Business 
Manager of The Seamen's Journal, 
and that the following is, to the best 
of his knowledge and belief, a true 
statement of the ownership, manage- 
ment (and if a daily* paper, the circu- 
lation), etc., of the aforesaid publica- 
tion for the date shown in the above 
caption, required by the Act of August 
24, 1912, embodied in section 443. Postal 
Laws and Regulations, printed on the 
reverse of this form, to wit: 

1. That the names and addresses of 
the publisher, editor, managing editor, 
and business managers are: 

Name of — Postofflce address — 

Publisher, Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
Editor, Paul Scharrenberg, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
Managing Editor, Paul Scharrenberg. San 

Francisco, Cal. 
Business Manager, S. A. Silver, San 

Francisco, Cal. 

2. That the owners are: (Give names 
and addresses of individual owners, or, 
if a corporation, give its name and the 
names and addresses of stockholders 
owning or holding 1 per cent, or more 
of the total amount of stock.) 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific. San Fran- 
cisco; not a corporation. Principal offi- 
cers of the Sailors' Union: Andrew Fu- 
ruseth, Secretary, San Francisco; John 
11. Tennison, Assistant Secretary, San 
Francisco. 

3. That the known bondholders, mort- 
gagees, and other security holders own- 
ing or holding 1 per cent, or more of 
total amount of bonds, mortgages, or 
other securities are: (If there are none, 
so state.) 

None. 

4. That the two paragraphs next 
above, giving the names of the owners, 
stockholders, and security holders, If 
anv. contain not only the list of stock- 
holders and security holders as they ap- 
pear upon the books of the company 
but also, in cases where the stockholder 
or security holder appears upon the 
books of the company as trustee or In 
any other fiduciary relation, the name of 
the person or corporation for whom such 
trustee is acting, is given; also that the 
said two paragraphs contain statements 
embracing affiant's full knowledge and 
belief as to the circumstances and con- 
ditions under which stockholders and se- 
curity holders who do not appear upon 
the books of the company as trustees, 
hold sto^k and securities in a capacity 
other than that of a bona fide owner; 
and this affiant has no reason to believe 
that any other person, association, or 
corporation has any interest direct or In- 
direct in the said stock, bonds, or other 
securities than as so stated by him. 

8. A. SILVER, Business Manager. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me 
this 27th dav of September. 1918. 
(Sean MAROUERITA S. BRUNER. 

i My commission expires Jan. 8, 1H22.') 



Sailors' Outfitter 
BENJAMIN'S 

The Old Reliable 

CLOTHING. SHOES. HATS. RUBBER 

AND OIL, CLOTHING 

207 Second Street Eureka, Cal. 

E. BENJAMIN, Prop. 



Cigars and Tobaccos 

Periodicals 
F. W. MOGENSEN 

217 E STREET EUREKA, CAL. 



DRUGS, KODAKS, 

STATIONERY 
The REXALL Store 

ATKINSON & WOODS 
F STREET, Cor. 2d, EUREKA, CAL. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention The Sea- 
men's Journal. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

116-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 
ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING. HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS. SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS. SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN, Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Aberdeen, Wash , Letter List 

Anderson, Peter KanKaanpaa, J. E. 

Albers, Geo. Lampe, Fred 

Browen, Alexander Lehtonen, A. 



Braun, Alex. 
Bjerk, G. T. 
Bruhn, Chas. 
Bran, Mattia 
Brant, Max 
Barrot, G. 
Brandt, H. 
Bengtson, S. 
Davis, John 
Eliassen, H. C. 
Flohten, James 
Frohne, Robert 
Hedrick, Jack 
High, Edward 
Helander, J. F. 
Heyn, Th. 
Jansson, John 
Jansson, J. A. 
Johanssen, John F. 
Johnsen, Hans 
Johnson, Hilmar 
Kallas, Augers 
Khamp, S. 



Markman, H. 
Malkoff. Peter 
Meiners, Herman 
Magnusson. Charles 
Newman, I. 
Olsen, A. 
Olson, W. 
Olsen, Alf 
Olsen, Ferdenan 
Petersen, Harry 
Pedersen, Alf. 
Rahlf, J. 
Risenius, Sven 
Rosenblad, Otto 
Swanson, G. 
Svenson, Gustaf 
Torln, Gustaf A. 
Thompson, Alex. 
Valfors, Arvid 
Wendt, W. 
Williams, T. C. 
Zlmera, Geo. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders Taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

320-322 So. F St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



Phone 263 

"Ole and Charley" 

"The Royal" 
"The Sailors' Rest" 

Cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
21» EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH. 



TACOMA, WASH. 
HARRY W. LEVY 

CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS 
Union Made Goods, Hats, Shoes, 

Trunks and Suitcases 

Fishermen's and Sailors' Supplies 

(OLD TOWN) Tacoma, Wash. 

Main 1113 



Sy f\ If r D C See that this label (in light blue) appears on the 
lVlUIVCIVO box in which you are serve d. 

Issued by Authority oi the Cigaf Makers' lnt«mation«l Union 

Union-made Cigars 

2lll£ GfVtrflrf. IWtln 0»«» umtni iMhti bo. M« owe m*d< by* lid UBS WUVWA 

iKStUOf IHtSlCMIUMO'lintluuIiOiilLllNlOilor A»nu. i«ooM«««.4e«ot«lt«ftu4 

n»(t»«MO«ju™wwi«TWia\miflii»M0r'rHtaiArt 1*****mi*t—m 




Ciojri to in 3iw**f* Ui.-ouBhom 

M kirapu*i«»«itlia LiM «*fet (xinnlwl KimVH H IM, 



If CtfJVtfA 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



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The Emergency Fleet Corporation, 
Philadelphia, is having plans prepared 
for the erection of a number of new 
buildings to form a community center 
near Gloucester City, N. J., for em- 
ployes of the shipbuilding plants in 
that vicinity. The structures will in- 
clude apartment houses, dwellings, 
store buildings, school house and 
other buildings. 

Under an executive order just an- 
nounced, the President authorizes the 
placing of war supply contracts with 
the heads of prisons and reforma- 
tories at prevailing prices, and directs 
that prisoners engaged on such con- 
tracts shall receive wages corre- 
sponding with those paid for similar 
work in the vicinity. Congress al- 
ready has provided for industrial 
plants at some Federal prisons. 

Only a month's supply of gasoline 
remains in the country at the pres- 
ent rate of consumption, according 
to a statement to the Senate by 
Fuel Administrator Garfield. Ob- 
jection was raised in the Senate to 
the fuel administrator's recent re- 
quest that the Sunday use of pleasure 
automobiles be discontinued. In de- 
fending this action, Mr. Garfield said 
there will be a deficit this year of 
1,000,000 barrels of gasoline. 

The United States Senate on Oc- 
tober 1 refused to grant the request 
of the President that the woman 
suffrage resolution be passed as a 
war measure. After five days of 
bitter debate, corridor conferences 
and cloakroom negotiations, the Su- 
san B. Anthony Federal amendment 
resolution, enacted by the House 
last January, received on the final 
roll call two votes less than the 
necessary two-thirds majority. Fifty- 
four Senators were recorded for it 
and thirty against it, with twelve 
absent and paired. 

A system of Government-owned 
deep sea-level canals extending from 
Massachusetts to the South Atlantic 
States is recommended in a report 
submitted to the Senate by Secretary 
Redfield in rsponse to a resolution 
adopted last July. Such action would 
not only be of wide commercial 
value, but would be of great military 
value as well, said Secretary Red- 
field in a letter accompanying the 
report. Permanent acquisition by 
the Federal Government of the Cape 
Cod and the Chesapeake and Dela- 
ware canals and their prompt im- 
provement, as well as the early con- 
struction across New Jersey of a 
sea-level canal having a minimum 
depth of 25 feet, is recommended. 
The Cape Cod canal is being oper- 
ated now by the Railroad Adminis- 
tration. 

The House of Representatives has 
accepted the Senate's prohibition 
amendment to the Food Stimulation 
bill, and the Nation will become dry 
on June 30 next and remain so until 
the American forces are demobilized, 
if the action of Congress is approved 
by President Wilson. The vote in 
the House was 171 to .34. The 
amendment as finally passed pro- 
vides that after May 1, 1919, and 
until the termination of demobiliza- 
tion, "no grains, cereals, fruit or 
other food product shall be used in 
the manufacture or production of 
beer, wine, or other intoxicating 
malt or vinous liquor for beverage 
purposes"; that after June 30, 1919, 
and until the termination of demob- 
ilization, "no beer, wine, or other 
intoxicating malt or vinous liquor 
shall be sold for beverage purposes 
except for export." 



14 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




Secretary of the Navy Daniels has 
officially removed the name of the 
collier ''Cyclops" from the register 
of the Navy. 

Edward F. Cullen, president of the 
Cullen Barge Corporation, of New 
York, announces that this concern 
has fifteen barges under construction. 
These boats range in capacity from 
1000 tons to 2500 tons each. Several 
of them will be launched before the 
end of the present month and 
will be in commission by the end of 
the season. The boats are being 
built at Rondout, on the Hudson, 
and will be used for carrying grain, 
coal and merchandise from Buffalo 
to Boston by the Erie Barge Canal 
and the Hudson River. 

A huge dry dock, where ships 
damaged by U-boats will be re- 
claimed, is said to be planned for 
the property of Ichabod T. Williams 
& Sons, lumber dealers, at Staple- 
ton, S. I., just leased by the Gov- 
ernment for a term of twenty years. 
The tract has a water frontage of 
1500 feet, and includes everything 
from the Tompkinsville line to the 
landing at Stapleton, excepting the 
Brady property. Tt is undei 
that about $1,300,000 has been ap- 
propriated for the improvement of 
the land. Recently the Government 
took over the plant of the Merritt 
& Chapman Derrick and Wrecking 
Co., in Bay street, Stapleton. 

Preparations are being made to 
lay the keel of the first of ten oil 
tankers to be built by the Terry 
Shipbuilding Corporation, Savannah, 
Ga., for the Emergency Fleet Cor- 
poration. The contract for the ten 
tankers is understood to represent 
a total of about $16,000,000, the cost 
of each vessel being $1,600,000. The 
Terry concern has also been awarded 
a contract for the building of two 
floating dry docks, each with a ca- 
pacity of 10,000 tons. The estimated 
cost of each dry dock will be slight- 
ly in excess of $1,000,000. One of 
these floating dry docks will remain 
in Savannah, while the other will 
be towed to some other port. 

Success continues to mark the 
precautions taken to protect shipping 
off our coasts and waters adjacent, 
and there is every reason to believe 
that U-boat effectiveness "over 
here" has been in large part if 
not wholly eliminated. Sinkings in 
other sections of the war zone al- 
though still a matter of record, 
show no tendency to increase, but 
rather the reverse. A gratifying 
feature in this latter connection is 
the knowledge that in several in- 
stances the vessels attacked and 
wounded have been able to make 
port or be beached in locations 
permitting ready salvage for repair 
and early recommissioning. 

In order to adequately handle the 
ponderous overseas mails augmented 
by the transportation of nearly two 
million soldiers to Europe, the 
United States Government has taken 
over North River Pier 86, at the 
foot of West Forty-sixth street, New 
York, and will at once establish a 
sub-postoffice there. This announce- 
ment was made during the week In- 
Major Thompson, supervisor of 
overseas mail. Pier 86, North River, 
was recently constructed by the city 
at a cost of more than $4,000,000, 
and is considered the most modern 
structure of its kind in the country. 
It is 150 feet wide and about 1500 
feet in length. Originally it was in- 
tended for transatlantic steamship 
service. 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 29th, 1918 

$59,397,625.20 

55,775,507.86 

2,286,030.34 



Assets 

Deposits - 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 

Employees' Pension Fund 



284,897.17 



OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK, President 

GEO. TOURNY, Vice-Pies, and Mgr. A. H. R. SCHMIDT, Vice-Pies, and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE, Vice-President 

WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier 

A. H. MULLER, Secretary 
WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary 
GOOHFELLOW, EELS. MOORE & ORRICK, 
General Attorneys 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
JOHN A. BUCK A. II. R. SCHMIDT A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY I. N. WALTER E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. T. KRUSE HUGH GOODFELLOW ROBERT DOLLAR 



o i-i ■ !■■ w • .[Jensen, ll. -2425 

ban r rancisco Letter List Jensen, Jens r. 

Jensen, Lorentz 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
mon His only and will be returned to the 
Post office at the expiration of four 
months from the date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
S. A. Silver, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



Johnson, Ralph 
Johansson, laniard 
Johnson, Fred 
i . Charles Johnson, Hjalniar 

Juhaiiiiesen, Anthon Johnson, Norman 

inesen, Hegle Johnson, oie 
Johannesen, Johan Johnston, Leslie 
Joliansen, A. -2412 Junes, E. L. 



Ackerman, Valfred 
Acosta, Miguel 
Adolfsson, John 
Aluwe. Joe 
Ampuja, Anton 
Andersen. Frank 



Anderson, E. 
Anderson, F. V. 
Anderson, John C. 
Anderson, Oskar L. 
Andersson, w. 
Andersson, C. J. 



n, H. -2127 Andersson, Brick 

Andersen, John Andersson, Gottfried 

Andersen, M. -2054 Andersson, Sture 

Andersen, Nils F. Andreas, Johannes 



Andersen, Rasmus 
Anderson, Andrew 
Anderson, Albert 
Anderson, Carl J. 
Anderson, C. N. 



Arentseii, Qunnar T 
Ask, Alfred E. 
Ask, Lorentz 
Auckland, Gus 
Azarov, Daniel 



Baali, M. 
Babehuck, Ernest 
Backman, A 
Bahn, C. F. 
Barry, Dick 
Baumiller, Carl H. 
Beekly, Christ 
Ben row! tz, Felix 
Benstrom, Axel 
Bergesen, Berger 
Berg, Sigfrid 
Berner, Albert 
Bernstein, Hans 
Bertelson, Oscar 
Hilling ton, M. 
Binder, Herbert 
Biron, E. 
Bjork, Martin C. 



Birhnes, Oie A. 
Blair, Francis 
2055 Blixt, Gus 

Blomgren, Carl A. 
Blomgren, Fred 
Blomgren, M. A. 
Blomkvist, Albert 
Borgen, Arne 
Borgesen, Oscar 
Borjesen, L. 
Bouma, Jan 
Bower, Claude S. 
Brevick, Johan 
Brian, Jos. 
Brown, Geonre W. 
Brunwald, Harry 
Bye. Alf 
Bye, Kristian 



Joliansen, Fritz 
Johansen, John 
Johanson, Robert 
Johnsen, G. 
Johnson, Gunnar 

Kaktin, Ed. 
Kallberg, Arvid 
Kamp, Charles 
Karlson, Axel 
Karlsson, Junan 
Kaskinen, A. 
Kasperson, E. 
Kearns, tf. 
Kelly, E. -1050 
Kirkham, George 
Knaut, Charles 
Knockenhauer, II. 
Larsen, Alf 
Larsen, Arthur 
Larsen, H. 
Larsen, ingoif 

i, Laurits K. 
Larson, Cornelius 
Larson, L. A. 
Larsson, Ragnar 
Leinasar, Jacob 



Jones, Fred 
Jonson, 1'. W. 
Jordan, Henry 
Joigensen, Robert 

Knudsen, Daniel 
Koch, Gottlieb 
KoppeL John 
Korbee, H. J. 
Koskinen, Waino 
Kosoff, 1. 
Koster, Walter 
Kratton, R. M. 
Kraut, Charles 
Kiistensen, L. P. J. 
Kruse, Unas. 
KurgTeL Oles 
Liljedahl, Ludvig 
LiiKiulad, Conrad 
Lindros, G. J. 

luist, Charley 
Lubbers, Henrick 
Ludvigsen, P. L. 
Lund, Ulai 
JLundbcrg, Thorn 
Lundinark. llelge 



Calem, Anthony 
Call, Fred 
Carlsen. Albln 
Carlsen, Severin 
Carlson, Carl 
Carlson, Seth 
Carlson, Warner 
Carlson, C. S. 
Carsten, A. 



Christensen, Fred- 

rlk R. 
Christensen, Otto 
Christensen, Victor 
Christoffersen, C. 
Christofferson, 

Gunval 
Clausen, Louis 
Crosiglio, Joseph 



Letchford, AlexauderLynch, James 

Lewis, Harry S. Lyngaard, George 
Lewis, Owen J. 

MacManus, P. McNair, H. S. S. 
Madsen, Jack id, H. J. 

ii, Tom Melander, J. K. 

Magnuson, Magnus Mess, William 

Malmgren, Oskar Meyer, H. 

Malsnom, ErlcK Meyer, Hans 



Hop, Albert 

Vdolph 
Rosen, valfrld 
Ruckmlch, A. 

ve 
Saharoff, J. A. 
Sandblom, Konrad 
Bandkvlst, Eelk 
Sandstedt, I 
Sandstrom. O. H. 

Rudolph 
Sounders, O. 
Sarin, Charlies 
Sarin, Wiltielm A. 
Schmidt, C. 
Simensen, Arne 
Slmos, Antonio 
Simpson, L. C. 
Smith, Geo. C. 
Smith. John T. 
Smyth, Joseph B. 
Speckninnn, M. 
Solum, M. 
Solvin, Oscar E. 
Sorensen, J. H. 
jorensen, Jorgen 

Taival. Alfred 
Talbert, Frank 
Tanman, Robert 
Theorin, John E. 
is, I lenry 

Thor, Laurl 
Thorngren, Chas. G. 
Uhlen, Jack 
Vadum, Kris 
Valkonen, \ 
Van Vleet, T, B. 
Van Graff. Jan 
Wachter, John 
Wagner. Ralph W. 
Wake, John 
Wald, Frank 
Wall, Alfred 



Ruger, Harry \v. 
Runnqulst, Gust. 
Ryan. Pat! 
Ryder, Os 
Sorensen. O. E. 
Sorensen, L. A. 
Sorensen, S. C. 
Sowick, Bernard 
Spatz, K. 
Sternberg, Alf. 
Stevensen, August 
Strandgard, Christ 
Strandqui.st, Louis 
Stromblad, Olai 
Strom, Karl O. 
Strybos, D. 
Stupurak, J. V. 
Sund, Alex 
Svanson, William 
Svendsen, Henry 
Svendsen, S 
Svensson, John 
Sveelngsen, S. U. 
Swensen, Anker 
Swenson, Rubin 

Tiller. Edward 
Tilt, Clifford 
Toblason, Joel 
Tomson, Charley 
Toutt, Walter 
Trlho, George 
Trimmer, David 



Vera, ( I 
Verhof, H. 
Verkamman, P. 
Verkamo, J. J. 
Wichman, Daniel 
Wlcklund, T. 
Wihavainen, Geo. 
Wilkinson, George 
Williams, John 



Wallenstrand. HarryWilliams, John L, 



Wamser. A. 
Ward, Carl 
Wank, Roman A 
Welsson, Emll 
Wesgard, Jens 
West, I. 
Westvik, I. 



Williams. T. C. 
Wilson, Williams 
Winkler, Otto 
Woldhouse, John 
Wolstennolm, 

Thomas 
Wright, J. A. 



Wezwagar, Andrew Wurst, Walter 
Young, W. H. 

Zeritt, John Zetergren, E. 

PACKAGES. 



Ekwall, Gust A. 
ESnstrom, Carl M. 
Fagerberg, Ivan 
Frazer, Alex V. 
Halvorsen, Elmer 
Irmey, Fred 
Johnson, Carl 
Johnson, Ivar 
Jurgenson, Julius 
Kerr, II. J. 
Malmqulst, E. J. 



Mortensen. J. C 
Mourlce, Francis 
Nelson, A. -1092 
Olson. Knut 
Osterholm, John W. 
Paal, K. 
Roach, Alfred 
Smith, John T. 
WeBgaard. .I«ns 
Zeaberg, .lark 



Markman, Harry 
Martinsen, Nordal 
Marshall. E. K. 
Martinsen, Jonn 
Mathiesen, Axel 
Mathlson, David 
Mathusen, L. 

vi ay, F. B. 



Miatas, Nicola] 

Milnor, C. D. 
Mirabal, Jose 

r, A. B. 

Moiler, F. A. 
Monroe, J 

Mortensen, B. 



McLeod, Norman A.Mulley, James 



Chilberg, Benjamin Conolly, Obert 



Christensen, C. 
Christensen, Oskar 

Dahlgren, W. A. 
I iiilhstrom, Arthur 

H. 
Dahlstrom, Ernst 
Dahlstrom, G. M. 
Daniels, D. M. 
I >avey, Chas. 



Corson, Geo. 

Dew Pree, Earl 
Dias. E. 

Didrickson, Martin 
Dixon, John 
Dobbin, Harry 
Dolan, C. 
Donk. Johan 



Davidson, Waldemar Dreyer, Jack O. 



De Moss, B. 
Delong, K. 
I leswert, W. 
Eckhardt, Charles 
Edvarse, Frits 
Ek, Chas. 
Ekelund, Rich. 
Ellassen, Adolf E. 
Engel. Paul 
Engellen, D. A. 
Engstrom, Ben. 

Fagerberg, Ivan 
Fagerlle, Odell 
Fernquist, C. W. 
Felsch, William 
Ficht, Arthur 
Fingerling, E. 
Fisher, G. A. 
Fjellman, George 
Flem, Knut 

Garcia, Jose 

Garfield, G. 

Geschwend, Walter Gulbranson, B. 

Qjesdahl, Elling Gulfeldt, A. 

Gonzales, Francisco Gusgron, Joseph 

Graham, Walter F. Gustavsen, Anton 



Dunwoody, Geo. 
Duncan. W. J. 
Dyer, John 
Erlckson, George 
Erickson, Gustav 
Erlckson, Nils 
Esterberg, Gust. 
Etherton, Ward 
Ettrup, Jens 
Evensen, J. L.. 
Eversen, Petter 

Fraser, Alexander V. 
Fraser, Charles 
Fraser, James 
Fredriksen, B. D. 
Freidland, Carl J. 
Fritz, Henry 
Frost, Konge 
Frost, Peter 

Green, Laurence 
Gregg, Harry B. 



Nannestad, A. 
Nellson, Neil 
Nelson, Charlie 
Nelson, N. P. 
Nelson, Rasmund 



Nilsson, Axel 
Nllsson, Hllding 
Nilsson, Reinholt 
Nolen, Axel 
Nordby, Jacob 



Newman, Gustav A. Nord, Clarence 
Nielsen, Harald .1. Noroenberg, 
Nielsen, Kristian 



rom, Enst 
Norling, Gust. 
Norton, Emil 
Nurkin, ±i. 
Nutcher, Lyle P. 

Olsen, Hans 
Olsen, Helmer H. 
Olsen, Herman 
Olsen, Johan S. 
Olsen, Karl 
Olsen, Oie -1325 
i 'Den, Oskar 
Olsen, Peter 
Olsen, Regular 
Olson, Albert 
Olson, John 
Osterman. John 



Grant, August 
Grant, Lewis 
Gray, Hamilton 

Halvorsen, Erling 
Halvorsen, Henry 
l [alvorsen, Olaf 
Hamm, R. 
Uaniren, T. 
Hansen, Antonlus 
Hansen. Chris. 
Hansen, Hans 
Hansen, Johannes 
Hansen, Oscar 
Hansen, Rangvald 
Hanson, Arthur 
Hanson, Karl J. 
Hanson, Edward 
Hauth. Carl 
Hawkins. C. A. 
Hay, C. W. 
Hazen. J. 8. 
Heldal. Trytroe H. 
Henensen, A. 
Henrlksen. C. 
Isakson, John A. 

Jacobsen, Alfred 
Jakobsen, Joaklm 
Jacobson, Emil 



Gussum, Joe 
Guthrie, R. 

Hess, Arthur 
Hildes. W. 
Hill -1387 

Hill, — -2030 
Hobbs, Frank 
Hofman, P. 
HoKstrom, Harry 
Holm, A. 
Holmes, Fred 
Holmes, W. 
Holmgren, H. 
Holmstrom, Carl A. 
Holmstrom, D. B. 
Holt. Fredrick S. 
Hood, Chas. S. 
Hovde, Mlchal 
Hoverson, C. 
Hubbard. Howard 
Hubbert. John L. 
Hylander, Gustaf 



Jansson, Fredrik 
Jensen, Anton 
Jen9en, Christ. 



Nielsen, Svend G. 
Nilsen, Conrad 
Nilsen, Hans L. 
Nils, m, Hjalmar 
Nilson, Nat 

Oakley, Loren D. 
Ofeldt, C. 
Okesson, Erlck 
Olausen, Christian 
Olesen, Ingwald 
Olgrein, Verner 
Olgren, Carl 
Olmstead, Harry 
Olsen, Amund 
Olsen, Ausgar 
Olsen, Charley 
Olsen, Edward 
Olsen, 11 F. 

Paavilalnen, A. J. 
Palhen, Geo. H. 
Palu, G. 

Panchot, Herbert 
Paulsen, Karl 
Parks, Leslie 
I'arral, Olegarlo 
in, Aksel 
Pedersen, Eugene 
Pedersen, Eysten 
Pederson, Cnarles 
Pedersen, Peter B. 
Pederson, Oluf 
Pedersen, Sofus R. 
Perkins. Will 
Petersen, Aage 

Petersen, A. -1676 Putkka, Werner 
Petersen, Olav -] 

Quickman, W. Quirage, Juan 

Quilje, Johannes Qvanstrom, Arvid 



REGISTRATION CARDS. 

Allias, \V. Jensen, Jena S. 

Andersen, Oie Johnson, Human E. 

Andreson, Andor J. Johnson. Herman 
Anderson, Jack J. KoskI, Juho 
Anderson, Lenus H. Larson, John W. 
Anderson, Victor E, Lauritsen, Oie 
Blair, Bernard Mattesen, Hans 

Campanl, Juan Mattson, Johan H. 

Carlman, David Nail, Elijlo 

Dahlberg, Oscar N ilnino 



Dewlin, Charles . 
Dumber, Ernest 
Elonen, John 
Ferguson, Emmet 
Finna, Mai 
Giske, Karl O. 



Nelsas, All 
Nordstrom, Gustaf E. 
Oad, John 
Pederson, Carl 
Root, Fred 
Sandell, John A. 



Grussman, Alec O. Kogahn, Axel 

Hagburg, Gust. Sandstrom, 1\ 

Halvorsen, Olaf Soderlund, J. 

Highland, Daniel Trigebretsen, T. 

Hinsen, Andrew L. Van Roon, Andrles 
Hoppenbrouner, Are-Wickman, Peter 

bus F. Weikman, William 

n, Isak Wright, William H. 



Alaska Fishermen 

San Franciico. 
ii. David 1'. Larsen, Olof 



Peterson, Gus 
Peterson, Harry J. 
Petterson, Einar E. 
Petterson, Knut 
Pettersson, T. -1734 

, William B. 
Pietch, Frank 
Pllcher, H. J. 
Pinklert, C. B. 
Pint, Q. H. 
Pokos, Wasili 
Pope, B. 
Porter, J. 
Powell, M. A. 
Powell, Patrick 

rgaard, w 



Radke, Paul 
Ram, B. 
Ramstad, Andreas 



Ringman, Carl 
Roach, Alfred 
Rod. Sakarias 



Rasmussen, Jack A. Roed, T. A. 
Rasmussen, S. A. Roesberg, Chas. V. 
Relmer, Peter M. Roos, Yrjo O. 
Rlngdahl, Karl Ronn, E. 



Berg, John 
Blom, John 
i. II. 
Burg, John 
Bywater, Chas. 

n, Thomas 
Gullefsen, Hans 

der, Joim 
Johansson, Arva 

On, Hans 
Johnson, John 
Knight n. 
Kolinen, Oscar 
Kuhn, John 

talen, Oie 

Hans' ii 



Mattsnn, Chas. 
Mittchel, Joseph 
Moberg, Oscar 
Nannestad, Arthur 
Olander, E. P. 
Olson, Anskar 
Ostberg, Ansgar A. 
Olsen, Peter E. 
Paulsen, .Axel .1. 
Sakarias, Rod. 
Sheldon, C. B. 
Simmonds, J. 
Steen, J. I. 
Tamisar. P 
Weber, Fred 
Wickman, Daniel 
Welsham, R. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Any number of the crew of "( 
Holmes" who was present when dust 
Fondahn was hurt near Cape Flat- 
tery when in tow of "Goliath" on 
the 3d of January, 1913, will please 
communicate with Attorney S. T. 
Hogevoll, 627 Pacific Building, San 
Francisco, or with F. R. Wall, Mer- 
:hants Exchange Building. 

9-11-18-Adv. 



WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

JOE WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 

Exclusively 
i. 28 EAST STREET, near Market 

Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 1G19 
Repairing Done While You Wait, by the Latest Machinery 

Work Called For and Delivered 
kVE USE ONLY THE! GEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 





THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 




WS.S. 



WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 

IS 8 UFO BY THE 

UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 25, 35 and 50 cents per day, 
or $1.50, $2 to $2.50 per week, with all 
modern conveniences. Free Hot and 
Cold Shower Bath on every floor. Ele- 
vator Service. 

AXEL, LUNDGREN, Manager 



Phone Garfield 2457 



HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 

THOS. S. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 

Res., Randolph 27 
Office Hours, 9 a. m. to 6:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 
SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 
Prices. :: :: Union Made Goods Only. 
103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Residence, 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2967 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 

Phone Douglas 1416 San Francisco 



French American 
Bank of Savings 

Savings and Commercial 



108 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

RESOURCES, $10,000,000 

Member of Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco 

United States Depository for 
Postal Savings Funds 

DIRECTORS 

G. Beleney J. M. Dupas 

J. A. Bergerot John Glnty 

S. Blssinger J. S. Godeau 

Leon Bocqueraz Arthur Legallet 

O. Bozio Geo. W. McNear 

Charles Caxpy X. Ds Plchon 




Ask for this Label 
on Beer 



INT'L UNION OF 
UNITED BREWERY and 
SOFT DRINK WORKERS 

OF AMERICA 
Asks you to write and speak to your 




Ask for this Label 
on Soft Drinks 



STATE ASSEMBLYMEN AND STATE SENATORS 



TO 



WORK AND VOTE 

Against the Ratification of the National Prohibition Amendment 
to the Constitution 



News from Abroad 



KELLEHER &. BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 

716 MARKET STREET— at Third and Kearny 

m ""/° N ™* D JL™ ... SUITS AND 

IN OUR OWN SHOP P.r.-mikgfe^Tiii. » l 1 

OVERCOATS 

to Order at Popular 
Prices 



Represented by 
E. PEGUILLAN 





JACOB PETERSEN & SON 
Proprietor* 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO ST., near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONI/i* EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

'Nuf Sed 



Kearny 3863 



JENSEN & NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



Jortall Bros. Express 

Stand and Baggage Room 
— at — 
212 EAST ST., San Francisco 
Phone Douglas 6348 



East Street No. 19, near Market 

TAI LOR 

To the U. S. Navy 

GEO. A. PRICE 

(IS RIGHT) 

Blues— UNIFORMS— Whites 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING, ETC. 

500 Lockers Free San Francisco, Cal. 



■-S3S Tacoma 

Carlstrand, Gustaf 
Hoffman, Fred 
Holmstrom, Carl 
Houge, Anton 
Kalberg, Wm. 
Krane, I. I. 
Larson, Alexander 
Magill, Michel 
Magnusson, E. W. 
Martinsson, E. 



Letter List. 

Meyer, Karl 
Nielsen, Niels -751 
Olsen, Emil 
Palken, G. 
Bertelsen, Bertel 
Pettersson, -1287 
Revheim, Oscar 
Seyfried, M. -2962 
Swansen, Carl 



1918 EDITION 

AUDEL'S 



NEW MARINE ENGINEERS GUIDE 

With Questions and Answers — Price, $3.00 

EDW. QUINN, Phone Prospect 354 DALT HOTEL, 34 TURK STREET 




Named Shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers 1 Union 



246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chi*. L. Baine, Sec-Treat. 



A STAB 
IN THE 
BACK 

Initiative 
Ame ndment 
No. 21 proposes 
to admit den- 
tists from any 
other State 
without exam- 

ination. 



35 out of 42 of 
Our Boys, this 
year's grad- 
uates in den- 
tistry of the 
University of 
California, have 
entered the 
Army and Navy. 
When these 
boys come back, 

if they do come 
back — from the 
fight for free- 
do m — they 
would have to 
compete with 
derelicts and 
incompetents 
let in without 
examination. 
Why favor the 
incompetent 
or derelict 
slacker? 

Vote NO 

ON AMENDMENT 

No. 21 



Joint 



Committee, Cal. Dental Associations 



Prisoners in Germany, including 
American prisoners, are said by a 
young French corporal, lately es- 
caped from Germany, to be badly 
treated and poorly fed. Starvation 
would be general among them but 
for the food-parcels sent from Amer- 
ica. 

Austrian shipping companies are 
reported to be negotiating the sale 
of two steamers lying in the Black 
Sea to Turkish shipowners. The 
vessels are the Armiathea, 3,891 tons, 
price ten million crowns; and the 
Bithynia, 3,121 tons, price seven mil- 
lion crowns. 

President Irigoyen has asked Con- 
gress to adopt a law appropriating 
80,000,000 pesos to increase the size 
of the Argentine Navy. The first 
additions are to be cruisers of the 
latest design, submarines, and hy- 
droaeroplanes. Important naval bases 
are to be established at Mar del 
Plata and Puerto Madrin. The pro- 
posed law also authorizes Govern- 
mental acquisition of Argentine's 
merchant marine for trading pur- 
poses with America and Europe. 

Two large shipbuilding plants are 
being erected in Southern Chile. They 
will be Teady for operation this 
month, and the building of wooden 
vessels will begin immediately. The 
new shipyards are being constructed 
at Lianao. The wood to be used 
in shipbuilding is native timber — 
Chilean oak, spruce and other woods. 
The machinery for the new vessels 
will be bought in the United States if 
it is possible to get it there, other- 
wise the builders will get it from 
Antofagasta. 

A Spanish royal order just pub- 
lished authorizes, in addition to 
special permits previously granted, 
the exploration until the end of the 
current year of 20,000,000 kilos of 
olive oil, one-half of which shall be 
allotted to North and South Amer- 
ica, according to a cable from Consul 
General Hurst, at Barcelona. An 
export duty of 30 pesetas per 100 
kilos will be collected before ship- 
ment, and all containers must be en- 
graved or otherwise indelibly marked 
with trade label, registered or not, 
showing Spanish origin of the oil. 

Interest paid the American Gov- 
ernment by the allied countries on 
war loans now amounts to about 
$10,000,000 monthly, and within a 
year is expected to reach $40,000,000 
a month. This was disclosed by 
U. S. Treasury Department officials, 
who said a few thousand dollars still 
is due from the Russian Government 
from the $187,000,000 advanced earlier 
in the war, but this would be paid 
as soon as some accounting diffi- 
culties are straightened out. Ap- 
proximately $110,000,000 in interest 
has been paid so far by allied gov- 
ernments. Current loans are made 
at S per cent. 

A spirited piece of salvage work 
was recently performed on the 
Yangtse by the Standard Oil Co. 
river steamer "Meitan." The U. S. 
gunboat "Palos" had struck a reef 
ten miles above Ichang, being badly 
holed forward, and her engines 
damaged. The "Meitan" got her off, 
and brought the "Palos" lashed 
alongside safely into Shanghai, the 
distance of 976 miles being covered 
in 81 hours. The feat is the more 
creditable as the "Palos" had her 
pumps hors de combat, and the 
"Meitan" had to use her own during 
the whole time to keep the water 
in the gunboat under. 



16 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits 



Not His Function— "I want to 
know," said the grim-faced woman, 
"how much money my husband drew 
out of the bank last week." 

"I can not give you that informa- 
tion, madam," answered the man in 
the cage. 

•You're the paying teller, aren't 
you?" 

"Yes, but I'm not the telling payer." 
— Boston Transcript. 



At the Peace Conference. — "Judge," 
said the man at the bar, "there's no 
use of you trying to square this 
thing up. My wife and I fight just so 
often and just so long, and we can't 
help it. So there you are." 

"And about how long do you keep 
it up?" asked the judge. 

"About two weeks, judge." 

"All right. I'll give you fifteen 
days in jail; in other words, you are 
interned for the duration of the war." 
— Richmond Times-Dispatch. 



Sweet Alice's New Job. 
Oh, don't you remember sweet Alice, 
old sport, 
Sweet Alice, so languid and pale, 
Who shuddered aghast at the men- 
tion of work, 
And fainted at sight of a snail? 
On a fertile farm in the valley, old 
sport, 
Far removed from the big city's 
thrall, 
There are all sorts of lassies at back- 
breaking tasks, 
And sweet Alice works hardest of 
all I 

— Syracuse Herald. 



The Missouri Mule Abroad. — A 
long and patient but vain effort on 
the part of a khaki-clad driver to in- 
duce a mule, drawing what appeared 
to be a load of laundry, through the 
gateway of a local hospital afforded 
considerable amusement to the boys 
in blue who were watching the pro- 
ceeding*. The mule would do any- 
thing but pass through the gate- 
way. 

"Want any 'elp, chum?" shouted 
one of the boys in blue to the driver, 
as he rested a moment. 

"No," replied the driver, "but I'd 
like to know how Noah got two of 
these blighters into the Ark!" — Tit- 
Bits. 



An Invitation 

We Invite deposits from every one — 
rich, poor, old and young. We recog- 
nize no classes, but treat large and 
small depositors with the same cour- 
tesy and consideration. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Bagley's Gold Shore 

Packed in convenient pocket 
poucher. Contains more good 
Smoking Tobacco for the money 
than any package for the price. 
Why buy tin goods and pay extra 
for the tins. 



SB «o tamrf fjiKtotUrfj ol tin i~- , 

IltAumvntiau^mviirruiunaiui 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man aa a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always In view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now. In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and Its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There Is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how Ignorant the seaman may be, even In the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and In a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 




Christensen's Navigation 
School 

Established 1fM 

257 HANSFORD BLDQ., 268 MARKIT 

STREET 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. 




SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront 
since I 866 — over 50 years. Enough said. 

We DO NOT Supply Mattresses or Bedding to Vessels 

J. COHEN &. CO. 



BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 



72 EAST STREET 



Opposite Ferry Post Office 



Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



HENRY HEINZ 



When Yeu Buy 
from Us, Liberty 
Bonds are Ac- 
cepted for Cash. 



Phone Douglas 5752 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
Original Size 




SOLID GOLD $1.50 
GOLD FILLED .60 



Diamonds 

Watches ~ 64 market street 

High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



UNION LABEL SHIRTS 

AT FACTORY PRICES 
DIRECT TO WEARER 

EAGLESON & CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO, 1118 Market Street 
Los Angeles, 112-16 So. Spring Street Sacramento, 717 K Street 

Out Union Catalogue of Shirts and Furnishings 

Endorsed by San Francisco Labor Council 

San Francisco Building Trades Council 

San Francisco Label Section 

State Building Trades Council 



Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Silverware 



Union 
Made 




715 MARKET STREET, Above Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



QamesJt. Sorensen 

At the Bio R»d Clock 
\ snd the Chlmee. 



Jewelers, Watchmakers, Opticians 

Big Stock— Everything Marked in Plain Figure* 

THE ONE-PRICE JEWELRY STORE 

FINK WATCH REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 



BUY 

MEN'S 

FURNISHINGS 

AT 




Market at Fifth 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 
Phone Kearny 819 

Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Boots, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and OH Clothing 

of All Kinds, Watches, 

Jewelry, Etc. 

676 THIRD STREET 

At 3rd and Townsend, San Francisco, Cal. 



I Want You 
Seamen 
to wear 

Union 
Hats 

$2.50, $3.50 
$5.00 

"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

Deserves Your Patronage 




Union Store 
Union Clerks 



72 Market Street 

Next to Ocean Market 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 



KD SEAL CKjAR CO., MANirALTUBCBS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 



CjifiBusrEU 

OVERALLS & PANTS 

UNION MADE «- 

ARGONAUT SHIRTS 



A 







^MtfrwasrePssgggA ^iiw^^^^aass 



FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXXII, No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1918. 



Whole No. 2508. 



WHY AN EIGHT-HOUR WORKDAY? 



Principles of the Shorter Workday Lucidly Defined. 



An opinion and an award just rendered by 
Mr. Walter Clark of the North Carolina State 
Supreme Court, acting as an umpire for the 
National War Labor Board, is of more than 
ordinary merit because it lucidly defines the 
principles of the eight-hour work day. 

Incidentally, the opinion furnishes a clear and 
concise reply to those spokesmen for reactionary 
employers who are still attempting to delay the 
universal acceptance of a basic eight-hour day 
in all industries. 

Mr. Clark's opinion and award follow, in full: 

Interpretation of An Agreement. 

This case has been submitted to the National 
War Labor Board upon the following "Agree- 
ment entered into between the members of 
Local Union No. 364, International Molders' 
Union of North America, and the Foundrymen 
of Wheeling and vicinity." 

First — That eight (8) hours constitute a day's 
work for all Molders and Coremakers. 

Second — That the wage rate be six dollars 
and fifty cents for the basic eight (8) hour 
working day. 

Third — All overtime shall be paid for at the 
rate of time and one-half. 

Fourth — Sundays and legal holidays, as pro- 
vided for in the constitution of the I. M. U. 
of'N. A. (viz., Memorial Day, Fourth of July, 
Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas and 
New Year's Day) be paid for at the rate of 
double time. 

The only controversy presented is as to the 
meaning of paragraph 1. 

It is clear that that paragraph standing alone 
would mean the eight (8) hour working day, 
beyond which the employes cannot be required 
or permitted to work. Upon the principle that 
the whole of an agreement should be construed 
together so that no part shall be invalid, section 
2 cannot be held as substituting a basic eight (8) 
hour day for the actual eight (8) hour day pro- 
vided by section 1. It is not reasonable to sup- 
pose that the employes having agreed upon an 
eight-hour day, should by the next rule repeal it, 
by substituting a ten or twelve-hour day for 
extra compensation. 

Camouflaging An Eight-Hour "Rule." 

The basic eight-hour rule is not an eight-hour 
day at all but simply a wage agreement. If the 
eight-hour day is extended to ten hours then 
the 50 per cent, added pay for the two extra 
hours in effect is an agreement to pay eleven 
hours' wages for ten hours' work, an increase 
of 10 per cent. It was doubtless thought that 
the extra 50 per cent, for the extra hours would 
discourage requiring extra hours, but this has 
not been the result in all cases, for in some 
plants ten hours from day to day, every day, 
has been exacted, and in others even thirteen 
hours a day has been known to be required. 
The object of the eight-hour law is to protect 
the health and lengthen the lives of employes, 
which would be seriously compromised by an 
she length of the day's work. 

It has been seriously contended that the "prin- 



ciples" adopted by this board deprive it of juris- 
diction to enforce an actual eight-hour day. 
Those principles, however, specify that in all 
cases in which existing law does not require 
the basic eight-hour day, "the question of hours 
of labor shall be settled with due regard to gov- 
ernmental necessities and the welfare, health 
and proper comfort of the workers." 

President Wilson, in his address before a joint 
session of the two houses of Congress August 
29, 1916, said that "The whole spirit of the time, 
and the preponderant evidence of recent eco- 
nomic experience spoke for the eight-hour day. 
It has been adjudged by the thought and ex- 
perience of recent years, a thing upon which 
society is justified in insisting as in the interest 
of health, efficiency, contentment and a general 
increase of economic vigor. The whole presump- 
tion of modern experience would, it seemed to 
me, be in its favo r , whether there was arbitra- 
tion or not, and the debatable points to settle 
were those which arose out of the acceptance of 
the eight-hour day, rather than those which af- 
fected its establishment. I, therefore, propose 
that the eight-hour day be adopted by the rail- 
road managements, and put into practice for the 
present as a substitute for the existing ten-hour 
basis of pay and service." And he recommended 
"the establishment of an eight-hour day as the 
legal basis alike of work and of wages in the 
employment of all railway employes who are 
actually engaged in the work of operating trains 
in interstate transportation." Congress enacted 
what is known as the "Adamson Eight-Hour 
Law" in consequence. 

The Federal Eight-Hour Record. 

Previous to that time the Federal eight-hour 
law, approved June 19, 1912, limited "the hours 
of daily service of laborers and mechanics em- 
ployed upon work done for the United States, 
or for any territory or for the District of Co- 
lumbia," to eight hours and provided that no 
laborer or mechanic so employed should "be re- 
quired or permitted to work more than eight 
hours in any one calendar day, upon such work." 

Judge Alschuler, in his decision in the Packing 
House case, quotes the above expression of the 
President, and says: "The public policy of the 
eight-hour workday has been given oft-repeated 
sanction by legislation in the majority of the 
States, as well as by Congress through enact- 
ments of various kinds too numerous for specific 
mention," and quotes the unanimous report of 
the President's mediation commission on January 
9, 1918, which declared "The eight-hour day is 
the established policy of the country." He fur- 
ther said: "The voluminous evidence adduced at 
the hearing in support of the contention for the 
eight-hour day is in the main logical and con- 
vincing, and it is particularly to be noted that 
insofar as concerns the general principle of the 
eight-hour day no evidence to dispute it was 
presented. Indeed on behalf of the employers it 
was repeatedly, openly and frankly admitted that 
a workday shorter than the ten-hour day was 
desirable. On behalf of the employers and in the 
presence of their superintendents it was freely 
stated that they all believed in a shorter work- 
day; that they had said so, and that there was 
no room for argument about it." There is a vast ' 



body of experience that a ten-hour day shortens 
the lives of the employes, injures their health, 
and that in point of production there is an in- 
crease by the substitution of eight hours for a 
longer period. Even if this were not true as to 
one day, the accumulated fatigue of working 
more than eight hours for a series of days re- 
duces the production below the quantity produced 
by strict adherence to that limit. 

Greater Production Under Eight-Hour Day. 

Especially is this so as to the molder's occu- 
pation, the life of whom, working at nine or ten 
hours per day, subject to the heat and noxious 
fumes, is said to average not more than fourteen 
years. In work of this kind, there can be no 
doubt that greater production will be had by the 
working of an eight-hour day than by working 
nine or ten hours. 

It is not conclusive, though a subject for con- 
sideration, that the majority of the other shops 
in Wheeling and vicinity are working on a nine- 
hour basis. All betterment has come by improv- 
ing conditions, and not continuing them when 
bad. Improving conditions is the object of this 
proceeding. 

The subject of an eight-hour day is not new, 
but has been discussed by the general public, by 
writers and public men and governmental offi- 
cials for many years. The first act for an eight- 
hour day was passed by Congress in June, 1868, 
and provided "Eight hours shall constitute a 
day's work for all laborers, workmen and me- 
chanics who may be employed by or on behalf 
of the Government of the United States." This 
act proved ineffective because, for some reason, 
Congress had failed to impose any penalty for 
violation of the act. More effective laws on the 
subject were passed and were approved August 
1, 1892, June 19, 1912, and in the Amendment to 
the Naval Appropriation Bill, approved May 3, 
1917. The latter amended the Statute which had 
authorized the President to suspend the eight- 
hour law "whenever Government necessity re- 
quired it," by providing that while the President 
in an emergency could suspend the eight-hour 
day in such case, the basic eight-hour day should 
obtain and overtime should be paid for at no 
less than time and one-half. 

Since that time the President has acted in con- 
formity with the act but his suspension applies 
only to the prohibition of working more than 
eight hours, and does not require it. It is still 
open to the employes to decline to work longer 
than eight hours, and in event of a difference 
with their employers to submit the matter to the 
National War Labor Board. 

Industries With An Eight-Hour Workday. 

The railroad employes, from coast to coast, 
nearly 500,000 in number, arc now operating on 
the basis of the eight-hour day. The same is 
true of the coal-mining industry, the packing in- 
dustry, the news print industry, the garment in- 
dustry, in Government construction, and in the 
lumber mills and saw mills of the great North- 
west. 

It may be that there are industries where it is 
still necessary to use a longer workday than 
eight hours during the duration of the war, but 
it does not seem that in consideration of the 
conditions that more than eight hours should be 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



exacted in the work that a niolder has to per- 
form. 

It is the consensus, as President Wilson stated, 
ul students of the subject, that the maximum 
production is to be had by the adoption of the 
eight-hour day; and that the preservation of the 
health and the lives of the employes will be pro- 
moted by that limitation. 

The employers have, as a rule, patriotically 
l; i \ lii full aid to the prosecution of the war by 
placing their splendid plants and their highly 
skilled chiefs at the service of the Government. 
The employes, as a rule, have also, with the 
same patriotism, yielded the eight-hour limitation 
wherever it has been necessary to speed up pro- 
duction for the Government. The former have 
received great increase in profit. The latter have 
contributed an increase in the hours of labor, 
ami vast numbers of men to fill our armies. The 
r have received from the Government; the 
latter have given to it. They should not be 
asked to do so, beyond the necessity of the oc- 
casion. 

The "Census of Manufactures" for 1914, page 
4N_'. shows more than 7,000,000 industrial em- 
ployes, of whom not more than 12 per cent. 
were under the eight-hour day. This number has 
since been increased considerably, but not as 
rapidly as would have been the case, but for the 
emergency of the war. Statistics also show that 
while Australia and New Zealand have frankly 
adopted the eight-hour day limit in all their in- 
dustries, in this country the average is still above 
that figure. This is largely due to the fact that 
in the southern mill industry the limit is still 
sixty hours per week and in the northern mills 
fifty-four hours. 

This, however, is no reason why more than 
eight hours should be required of the molders, 
whose trade exacts greater fatigue and exposure 
to noxious and dangerous fumes. 

That the country has not yet reached the 
eight-hour day in all cases is no reason why in 
this case it should not be upheld. Indeed it may 
be well considered that as the world, and espe- 
cially all free countries, are "on their way" to 
the adoption of the eight-hour law, might it not 
be for the interests of the employers frankly to 
i it, and avoid the constant struggle for its 
attainment by settling the question, once for all? 

When industries were on a small scale and 
the employer and the employe worked together, 
face to face, the fellow-servant doctrine was 
created by the courts which exempted the em- 
ployer from liability for injury inflicted upon an 
employe by the negligence of his fellow-servant, 
upon the ground that the servant contracted with 
a knowledge of the character of his co-employes. 
This became absurd when there were thousands 
of employes engaged in the same employment, 
but it has required statute after statute to change 
the judge-made law which had exempted the 
employer. 

In like manner, until very recently, and until 
changed by statute, the courts held that if an 
employe contributed in any degree by his own 
negligence to the injuries he sustained, he could 
imt recover. For this there has now been sub- 
stituted by an enlightened statute the provision 
that the damage shall be apportioned, and that 
the business shall bear part at least of the loss 
and the crippled employe shall not bear it all, 
or his destitute wife and children, in case of his 
death. For the same reason an employe, one of 
many thousands, is unable to contract on equal 
terms, either as to hours of labor, or rate of 
of laborers were fixed by officers ap- 
of vast numbers of men. The law must step in 
and require protection in these particulars of its 
citizens against injury to their health, or short- 
ening of their lives by the fatigue of excessive 
hours, inadequate wages, and lack of sanitary 
provisions. 

By the introduction of machinery and numerous 
inventions, production has been increased many 
fold, in some cases a thousand fold. It is not 
just that the profit accruing therefrom shall go 
to the employers alone, without the employes 
receiving a fair share of the vastly increased 
profits. 

In Pressly vs. Yarn Mill, 138 N. C, 424, it was 
said by this writer: "The law is not fossilized. 
It is a growth. It grows more just with the 
growing humanity of the age, and broadens 'with 
the process of the suns.' . . . Labor is the basis 
of civilization. Let it withhold its hand, and the 
forests return and grass grows in the silent 
streets. Not so long since, in England, labor 
unions were indictable as conspiracies. The 
! of laborers weer fixed by officers ap- 
pointed by capital, and it was indictable for a 
laborer to ask or receive more. There was no 
requirement that employers should furnish safe 
appliances, no limitations as to hours of labor, 
no age limit. With the era of more just legis- 
lation in this country and England, and else- 
where, shortening the hours of labor, forbidding 
child labor, requiring sanitary provisions, and 
safe appliances, labor has. been encouraged, and 
the progress of the world in a few years has 
more than equaled that of all the centuries that 
are dead. Justice to the laborer has been to 
the profit of the employer. The courts should 
not be less just than the laws." 

While an eight-hour day is stipulated for in 
paragraph 1 of the agreement, there are emcr- 
gencies likely to occur when for a brief period 
that limit may be exceeded. But the protection 
of the eight-hour day will amount to nothing if 
ts with the employer alone to declare the 



The 50 per cent allowed for over- 
time is too small a penalty in view of great 
profits that may arise. It is true that what is 
"an emergency* can be and has been defined. 
Still it rests with the employer to declare that 
the facts place the demand within the definition 
of an emergency. Such emergencies can ordi- 
narily be met by the adoption of the three-shift 
system or an increase in machinery. It is better 
that the machinery should be worn out than the 
bodii - of the employes. Man passes through this 
world but once, and he is entitled in the lan- 
guage of the great Declaration to some "enjoy- 
ment of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happi- 
n e s s ." 

It has been suggested, as some protection 
-i the abuse of constantly exceeding the 
limitation of hours by the employer declaring in 
his judgment "an emergency" to exist, that such 
extra days should be limited to three days in the 
week. This would only be a very partial remedy, 
for if the employe is overworked three days in 
the week his product will not only fall off dur- 
ing those days, but also during the remaining 
i the week. A better plan would seem to 
be a provision that the employer shall appoint 
a standing committee of two, and the employes 
a similar committee of two, and as the burden 
of establishing an emergency is upon those who 
assert it, the eight-hour limitation should not be 
exceeded unless at least three members of the 
joint committee of four agree that there is an 
emergency justifying working overtime. This 
would avoid also the objection that if there was 
only one member of the committee on each side, 
factious opposition by the representative of labor 
might prevent operation even when there was 
an emergency requiring it. 

for these reasons the following is 

THE AWARD. 

The molders employed by the Wheeling Mold- 
Foundry Co., at Wheeling. W. Virginia, 
shall not be required or permitted to work more 
than eight hours within any day of twentv-four 
hours, except in cases of emergency, and then 
under the following terms and conditions: 

1. Overtime work shall be paid for at the rate 
of time and one-half for all hours worked in 
excess of eight hours, with double time for Sun- 
days and holidays. 

2. The question whether or not an emergency 
exists, together with the length of time over 
which such emergency may extend, and the num- 
ber of extra hours per clay, shall be determined 
by agreement between the management and the 
working molders in the shop. 

.v For the purpose of effectuating the agree- 
ment mentioned in paragraph 2, a permanent 
committee of four persons is hereby created, two 
of whom shall be designated by the management 
of the plant and two by the working molders in 
the shop, the assent of at least three of whom 
shall be necessary for permission to work more 
than eight hours in any day of twenty-four 
hours. 

4. Interpretation of Award. For 'the purpose 
of securing a proper interpretation of this award. 
the Secretary of the National War Labor Board 
shall appoint an examiner, who shall hear any 
difference arising in respect to the award be- 
tween the parties and promptly render his de- 
cision, from which an appeal may be taken by 
either party to the National War Labor Board. 
Pending such appeal, the decision of the exam- 
iner shall be binding. 

WALTER CLARK, Umpire. 
September 16, 1918. 



U. S. LOANS TO FARMERS. 



During the month of June. $8,343,420 was 
hut to farmers of the Ignited States by 
the Federal land banks. The Federal 
land bank of Spokane leads in amount of 
loans closed, $1,262,800. 

During June 1196 applications were re- 
ceived asking for $5,127,011, and 2516 loans 
were approved, amounting to $6,793,527. 

' )n July 1 the total amount of mortgage 
loans placed since the establishment of the 
Federal land hanks was $10°. 51 7,308. cover- 
ing 48.297 loans, distributed as follows: 

Spokane $17,000,555 

St. Paul 16,205,000 

Omaha 13,264,140 

Wichita 12,292,700 

Houston 9.807,741 

New Orleans 7,646,540 

Louisville 6,704.106 

Berkeley 6.698,400 

St. Louis 7.172,172 

Columbia 4,746,513 

Baltimore 4,140,500 

Springfield 3,851,595 



FREE SPEECH. 



Right down the ages the Ruling Class 
has opposed freedom of discussion among 
the workers. "Down with discussion" has 
been the number One plank in the platform 
oi every autocrat and despot since humans 
have been able to talk and write. 

The plutes of Egypt, Babylon. Creece, 
and Rome prevented discussion among the 
slaves, without respect to either creed or 
color. Early Christianity saw men cruci- 
fied or stoned to death because, in the 
opinion of the Ruling Class of that time, 
they talked overmuch with their fellow 
men. 

The barons and overlords of the Feudal 
Age knew the danger of free speech, and 
made bonfires with the bodies of their vic- 
tims as a method of enjoining silence. And 
the Ruling Class of to-day seeks to prevent 
the mass of the people from enjoying the 
full freedom of speech, of press, and as- 
semblage. 

WHY? 

Why does the Ruling Class object to 
Freedom of speech among the workers? 
Why does a free press bring the cold sweat 
of terror to the brows of the autocrats? 
\\ hv does free assemblage strike fear into 
the hearts of the despots? What have they 
to fear? 

Is it that by free discussion the workers 
may discuss wrongs and seek to right 
them? Is it that freedom of discussion 
will clear the air of doubts, lies, humbug, 
cant and hypocrisy, and explode the false 
teachings of the Cunning Few? Is it that 
with freedom of discussion the despots 
scent disaster waiting for them around the 
corner? 

If the Ruling Class — the despots and au- 
tocrats, and those who safeguard their 
vested interests — have a righteous and holy 
cause to pursue in life, what have they 
to fear? For isn't it the simplest of logic 
that those who are in the right have all to 
gain and nothing to lose by freedom of 
discussion ? 

But by the same inexorable logic those 
are in the wrong have everything to 
lose and nothing to win by freedom of 
discussion. The Cunning Few know the 
danger of free speech, a free press, and 
free assemblage only too well. They know 
that, possessing these rights, the leaders 
of the proletariat can dry up the swamps 
of ignorance in the minds of the workers, 
and force Despotism, Capitalism, and P'alse 
Patriotism to stand naked for the damna- 
ble and rotten trinity it is — to be destroyed 
as soon as it has been distinctly visualized 
by the unfortunate class it has so pitilessly 
bled and ruined. 

The Master Class, and the political syco- 
phants who do its work, know that with 
freedom of discussion the brains of the 
workers are no longer fogged, allowing 
them to see clearly what stands between 
them and complete freedom. 

It is not without reason, indeed, that the 
iron fist of Despotism is ever ready to 
bruise the lips and stultify the mind of 
Democracy. — The Australian Worker. 



"The rights and interests of the laboring 
man will be protected and cared for, not by 
labor agitators, but by the Christian men 
to whom God, in His infinite wisdom, has 
given control of the property interests of 
the country." — George M. Baer, mine-owner, 
during the coal strike of 1912. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



The Cause of Anti-Mexican Feeling. 

Ill feeling between Americans and Mexi- 
cans along the lower Rio Grande River 
is kept alive by "pistol toters," Texas 
Rangers, and other civilian officers who 
have been permitted to act as trial judge, 
jurors, and executors. Ninety per cent, of 
the Americans do not appear to understand 
and do not seem to care to learn the cus- 
toms or to respect the ideals of the 
Mexicans. 

The above epitomizes an investigation 
of border conditions by Emilio C. Forto of 
Brownsville, Texas, at the request of 
Colonel H. J. Slocum, commanding Amer- 
ican forces on the border. Mr. Forto is an 
American citizen, speaks Spanish, and has 
lived in Brownsville for fifty years. He 
has held the offices of sheriff, county judge, 
and secretary of the school board of trus- 
tees. 

"The border Mexican," he says, "is a 
peace-loving, law-abiding and pleasure- 
seeking individual. He seeks no one's in- 
jury. As a rule he is kindly disposed and 
ever willing to share his half a loaf with 
the most abject stranger. Womanhood 
feels safe in his presence, and the hor- 
rible stories of criminal assault so com- 
mon elsewhere in the United States have 
no place here. A girl may go about the 
streets of Brownsville or along the public 
highways at midnight and feel safe. And 
since the days of 1860 to 1865, when war 
was the rule of the day, the number of 
murders committed here has been 75 per 
cent, less proportionately than in Dallas, 
Texas, or other large cities. But in a 
community 75 per cent. Mexican, there is 
naturally a tendency to cling to Mexican 
ideals, customs and manners. Here is 
where the lack of sympathetic under- 
standing figures. 

"Ninety per cent, of the Americans 
do not appear to understand and do not 
seem to care to learn the customs or to 
respect the ideals of the Mexicans. 

"The border Mexican as a rule is illiter- 
ate and consequently not well informed as 
to hygienic and sanitary requisites. Twen- 
ty-five per cent, of the newcomers usual- 
ly look upon the Mexican as a filthy, un- 
sanitary and sickly makeshift. They can 
not, and generally will not, assimilate him. 
Therefore everything relative to the Mex- 
ican and his habits becomes repulsive to 
the American who has been fed on anti- 
germ theories for a lifetime. I do not 
mean this as a comparison, nor do I mean 
to belittle the American for his beliefs. 
I merely refer to it as one of the obstacles 
to fraternal progress and the consequent 
uplift of a peace-loving people. I would 
not have the American change his belief, 
but would wish that he might not con- 
demn the Mexican because the latter has 
not been educated in the same belief. 

"ft is an unquestionable fact that the 
undisciplined Ranger force is responsible 
for the enmity and friction existing between 
Mexicans and Americans while they (the 
Mexicans) have great regard for and main- 
tain friendly relations with the United 
States soldiers, whom they consider their 
protectors. 



"During the so-called Mexican bandit 
raids many lives of good Mexicans were 
sacrificed by Rangers and other civil of- 
ficers, and the more ignorant and illiterate 
Mexicans were induced to become revenge- 
ful against Americans, and as a matter of 
fact the soldiers received the brunt of their 
antagonism and attack while looking after 
the Rangers. 

"It would require a lengthy discourse to 
place before you the real happenings of 
the alleged bandit raids in 1915, what 
brought them about, etc. Suffice to say, 
they were stimulated by the killing of 
two brothers from Mercedes on or about 
July 24, 1915; the lynching of a boy named 
Munoz at San Benito ' about the same 
time ; the indiscriminate killing of a father 
and two sons named Flores in the presence 
of the wife and mother of ten other sur- 
viving children at the Arroyo Colorado, 
without any provocation whatever, and 
many others whose names could be se- 
cured. The number of victims thus sac- 
rificed by such peace officers assuming the 
powers of a court of justice will probably 
never be known, though I understand that 
Attorney F. C. Pierce holds a list with 
names of nearly 300. 

"From all reports (some from army of- 
ficers whose testimony is probably avail- 
able) a campaign of extermination seemed 
to have begun in those days. The cry was 
often heard, 'We have to make this a white 
man's country!' It woidd not be difficult 
to establish the fact that many well-to-do 
natives of Texas, of Mexican origin, were 
driven away by Rangers, who told them 
'If you are found here in the next five 
days you will be dead.' They were in this 
way forced to abandon their property, 
which they sold at almost any price." 



Bethlehem Steel Co. Dodges Labor Award 

Eugene C. Grace, chairman of the Beth- 
lehem Steel Corporation, has been directed 
by the National War Labor Board to apply 
its award of last July, which was to be- 
come effective August 1. Because the 
corporation has dodged the award a dele- 
gation of machinists and other trade union- 
ists visited Washington and acquainted 
the War Labor Board with conditions in 
Bethlehem. The board cited Mr. Grace, 
who assured the board that the award 
would be applied. The steel magnate sug- 
gested, in effect, that while his concern 
could hardly be classed as poverty stricken, 
stockholders would appreciate higher prices 
since the Government has insisted on a 
living wage. Mr. Grace was informed that 
this is a matter beyond the control of 
the board. 

The award orders the corporation to 
pay rates equal to those paid by the Gov- 
ernment in its arsenals and navy yards. 
Collective bargaining is also ordered, and 
the corporation is instructed to select rep- 
resentatives to meet an equal number of 
employes' representatives to adjust dis- 
putes. The board assigned an official to 
see that this award was complied with. 

Archibald Johnson, first vice-president of 
the Bethlehem Steel Corporation, is mayor 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 

International Seamen's Union of America, 328- 
332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 
Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes des France, 33 Rue Grange 
aux-Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord, 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fryboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundt, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten 1 B., Sweden. 
DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade IS, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhavn 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nationale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 

SPAIN. 

Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 
Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo des Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's Worker. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Recent issues of the Union of South 
Africa Government Gazette have con- 
tained tables showing the retail prices 
of foodstuffs and other household 
necessaries (.candles, coal, paraffin, 
soap, clothing; ruling at nine princi- 
pal centers in the Union of South 
Africa, and the rise as compared with 
pre-war prices. The latest data avail- 
aide relate to the month of April. By 
taking as a standard the estimated 
expenditure upon the various articles 
by a family of five persons, it is cal- 
culated that the cost of the fixed 
quantity of food, etc., at the prices 
prevailing in Capetown in that month 
was 42.7 per cent, higher than before 
the war. 

Canadian methods of caring for re- 
turned soldiers who must be trained 
to new jobs are superior to those 
adopted by most of the allied nations, 
according to representatives of the 
Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-es- 
tablishment, who recently attended a 
conference in London on the after- 
care of disabled men. Features of 
the Canadian system which are not 
found among those in vogue in Eu- 
rope are the following: Every sol- 
dier is interviewed before his dis- 
charge with a view to ascertaining 
his needs; Canada has national and 
single control of the agencies for the 
soldiers' training; responsible paid 
officials direct the work; returned offi- 
cers and men are used as instructors 
where possible; occupational therapy 
is carried on in all military hospitals; 
long and efficient courses are given 
to prepare for permanent occupations; 
employment is found for trained men. 
In its Final Report on the '"Health 
of Munition Workers," issued by the 
Ministry of Munitions of Great Brit- 
ain, it is slated that up to the present 
there has been no marked breakdown 
in the health of women, and valua- 
ble preventive suggestions are given. 
The report says: "It is probable, 
however, that the strain has been 
greater than is at present apparent, 
having been hitherto counteracted 
and disguised by certain factors, such 
as improved food and better factory 
environment, welfare supervision, and 
tlie dropping out of the physically 
weaker. The committee consider that 
certain conditions of employment are 
essential if the risk of future break- 
down is to be avoided, including 
short hours of work conveniently 
arranged, medical supervision (in- 
cluding rest rooms, first aid, etc.), 
careful selection of workers, good 
a favorable factory environ- 
ment, with sympathetic management 
and supervision. 

London has its housing difficulties, 
no less than cities in this country, 
and a project involving an expendi- 
ture of £3,500,000 ($17,500,000) has 
been suggested as a means of solv- 
ing the problem. The London hous- 
ing program is to provide for seven 
years after the conclusion of peace, 
during which period abnormal con- 
ditions are expected to prevail. The 
appropriation would be expended at 
the rate of $2,500,000 a year during 
this period. The policy recommended 
provides for building new houses on 
> states ripe for development, and on 
sites mar insanitary and overcrowded 
areas. Already the London County 
Council has available I06y 2 acres, 
I nough to accommodate 17,000 per- 
sons, on the basis of two per room. 
It is expected that opportunities will 
develop for the acquisition of other 
sites in suitable localities. The com- 
mittee also plans to raze insanitary 
dwellings and to replace them with 
more approved structures. 



M. BROWN & SONS 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



LIPPMAN'S 

Head to Foot Clothiers for Men 

Fourteen Years in San Pedro 

532 Beacon Street 

531 Front Street 

Two Entrances 



FRERICHS NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

529i/ 2 BEACON STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

Seafaring people who desire to take up navigation, San Pedro, situated In the sunny 
south Is the Ideal place. Captain Frerlchs has established a Navigation School here 
and under hi* undivided personal supervision students will be thoroughly prepared 
to pass successfully before the United States Steamboat Inspector*. 

TERMS ARE REASONABLE 



S. G. SWANSON 

Established 1904 
For the BEST there is in TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
NOTE— S. Q. Swanson is not connected 
with any dye works and las DO solicitors. 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2d Floor, Bank of San Pedro, 110 W. 6th St. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront, Cal. 



Carl Hansen, a native of Soon, 
Norway, age 35, formerly a member 
of the Lake Seamen's Union, is in- 
quired for by his mother. Mam 
Hansen, 778 Sixth Ave., Milwaukee, 
Wis. 8-17-18 



The James H, 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



CUT THIS OUT! 

and send it with 25c and receive by re- 
turn mail Regular Dollar Size Package 
of our Famous Egyptian Beauty Cream, 

CREMONILE 
A Beauty Builder of Highest Order. 
You will be moie than delighted with 
the result. 

S. J. CHURCHILL CHEMICAL CO., 
Beaumont, Texas 



The Anglo- California Trust Company 

As successors to the SWEDISH-AMERICAN BANK 
offers a particularly convenient service to 

SEA FARING MEN and to the SCANDINAVIAN PEOPLE 

in California 

ANGLO-CALIFORNIA TRUST CO. 

Main Office: Northeast Cor. MARKET and SANSOME STREETS 

BRANCHES: 

16th and Mission Streets Fillmore and Geary Streets 

Third and Twentieth Streets 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $ 1,910,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 17,000,000 

COMMERCIAL SAVINGS TRUST 




Named Shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 




Ask for this Label 
on Beer 



INTL UNION OF 
UNITED BREWERY and 
SOFT DRINK WORKERS 

OF AMERICA 
Asks you to write and speak to your 



an< * I p^3^S^*\ Mineral 
fc)11ledl>?£5»gp?J Water 

""^25*s Or America ~<u>r 



Ask for this Label 
on Soft Drinks 



STATE ASSEMBLYMEN AND STATE SENATORS 

TO 

WORK AND VOTE 

Against the Ratification of the National Prohibition Amendment 
to the Constitution 



Olof Nilsson, born in Hufvulsvik, 
Jamtland, Sweden, year 1880, height 
5 ft. 8 in., brown eyes, dark brown 
hair; last heard from in 1909, on 
board S. S. "Kurrachee," Karrachi, 
India. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify his sister, Mrs. 
Nels Olson, 1033^ VV. First St., Du- 
luth, Minn. 8-21-18-Adv. 

The men hereinafter named are 
requested to call personally or com- 
municate with J. T. Smith, 112 Mar- 
ket St., San Francisco, Cal. Chas. 
Frascr, \Y. Holmes, Otto Kanka, 
Karl Olsen, William B. Tierce, 
Thomas Wolstenholme. 10-2-18-Adv. 

NOTICE. 

Masters, Mates and Pilots' 
Association of the Pacific has 
opened a branch office at 529^ 
Beacon St., San Pedro, Cal. ; Capt. 
H. C. Frerichs, Agent. 



QUESTIONNAIRES. 

Members whose questionnaires are ad- 
vertised in tins column siiuukl, in order 
to comply with the military regulations. 
Immediately notify S. A. Silver, Sailors' 
Union, i'J Clay Street, .San Francisco, to 
forward same to the port of their des- 
tination. 



San Pedro Letter List 



Andresen, Hans 
Aalto, Harry 

-on, Sven 
Breien, Hans 
Blecha, All 

ii, Borge 
Clay, Henry 
( ■< .11 i us. Ed. 
F.klund, Swen 
Ellingson, Billy 
Polvlg, Ludvig 
Foeberg, Leonard 
Flotman, G. 
Frost, Peter 
Gundersen, Fred 
Grassen, Joe 
Galleberg, Martin 
Gunerud, Thorvald 
Goffle, Le Wn. 
Holmstrom, Fritz 
Holmstrom, Hjalma 

n, Adolph 
llakanson, Axel 



Hoek, A. 
Kakanson, Axel 
Hammarquist, Gust 
man, Charles 
lack 
i ialvoraen, 1 1 
Hanson. Aug. -1134 
limy, Fred 
Johnson, Ole 
Johnson, Chas. A. 

-2044 
Jonassen, Johannes 
Jacobsen, Telegram 

-en, Fred 
Johansson, A. -1874 
Johansen, C. 
Jensen, Just. H. 
Koff, Michael 
Kruger, G. 
Kallas, M. 
r I.etchford, A. 
Lechemus, Bill 
Lill, Karl 



Larson, Gust. 
Lyngnes, Chris 
Louis, Jose M. 
Miller, John 
Mourlce, Francis 
Monson, Chas. C. 
Nordling. Frank 
Nurmi, Talni 
Norstrom, I 
Nelson, D. -1099 
Olsen, Ole W. 
Olsen, Andrew 
Pederson, Carl 
Pitkin, V. 



Pet row, Fred 
Petersen, Aage W. 
Quinn, Wm. 
Raaum, Harry 
Rytko, Otto 
Rasmussen. J. A. 
Shlieman, F. 
Stringer, E. 
Seppel, P. 
Solvin, O. E. 
Steen, Ivar 
Suni, A. 
Salo, Oscar 
Terkkl, Arthur 



Peterson, K. E. -90.1 Thornlund, John N. 
Pederson, John Williams, Edward A. 

Peterson, Hugo Warkala, John 

Paterson, C. V. Yeoman, W. K. 

Pelz, Fritz Zunderer, Theo 

IMPORTANT MAIL 

QUESTIONNAIRES. 
Anderson, Jack JohnLonnquist, John 
Clifford, Arthur R. Victor 
liani'ul, Albert Nilson, Nils Edward 

Samuel Sandstrom, Oscar I f. 
Kalnin, Edward Vestergaard, Thomas 



Aalta, Albert 
Aalta, Henry E. 
Aas, Fritjofe H. 
AbrahuuiHon, a. W. 
Addlesen, Johannes 
Anderson, A 
Anderson, Efiiain 
Anderson, Hans K. 
Axelsen, J. H. 
Baardsen. Hans M. 
Bergstrom, John E. 

, Air. R. 
Bowma, Jan 
Brown, Alexander 
Buck, John 
Byglin. O. O. 
< n, Carl 
Carlsen. H. C. 
Carlson, John A. 

m, Julius 
Carroll, James P. 
Castro, Julian F. 

Christiansen, Hans 
P. 

Christ ensen, Sig- 

vald A. 
Dillon, William J. 
Edwards, E. 

Ellassen, Elmar 
Bliasson, J. E. 
Ellison, Morris 
Engstrom, Mathlas 

K. 

Erickson, Chas. 
Erisen, John 
Erland, Oskar 
Calk, A. F. 
Ei llman, J. A. 
Fblvlk, C. E. 
Fredencksen, J. F. 
Friend, Arthur E. 
i ;. i ber, L. K. 

id, P. L. 
oan. G. 

Green, M. 

:iz, John 
Grondaht. Annas W. 

Gumdeross, I lans C. 
Gustafson, J. S. 
Hansen, .lonannsen 
Hansen, B. P. A. 
Hanson. Frank 
Henrikson, Henry 
Hermann, Carl E. 

ml, Daniel 
1 1 ins. n, Andrew 
Impinen, Frank F. 
[sberg, Axel 

son, Alexander 
R. 
Jansson, Karl H. 
Jansen. Bernh. 

. F.inar A. 
Jensen, Frank 
Earl 
Johnsen, Carl G. 

in, B. F. 
Johnson, Carl 

on, John A. 
Johnson, John E. 
Kaasik, August E 
Kelly, Edward 
Kihlstrom, Dom 
Koch, Carl 
Koffer, Alex 
ECoskl, Juho 



Kristiansen, Henry 

A. 
Larsen, Arthur 
Larsoe, James P, 
Larson, Fingal 
Larson, John M. 
La tn, Edward Q. 
Lax, Ernest 11. 
Lehtinen, Ernest II. 
Lendberg, Chas. 
Lienbert, Rudolph 
Lillberg, Frank 
Lind, Carl 
Lind, Gustave 
Ljung, Lindus 
Lokken, Olai K. 
Lolne, Fran* i* 
Lund, John A. 
Ludwig. -Nils H. 
Lundslrom. E. \V. 
Maki, Matt 
Ai.iKi.i. Anden 
Mannlk, K. J. 
Malhiesen. Axel 
Mattson, John H. 
Miller, Christian 
Monsen, llaylor 
Munch, Huge S. 
Nielson, Hans 
Nierni, Job 
Nilsen, John A. 
Nilsson, Mis it. 
Norton, Carl E. 
Olsen, Nlcolai 
Olsen, Claio 
Olsen, Angar M. 
Olsen, Edward 
Olsen, Mamlius 
Olsen, Ragnar 
Olson, Amandus 
Olson, Knut 
Olson, Waldemar 
Olsson, Otto 
Osman, John 
Ustergard. Frank 
< Hteni, Aksel 
Pederson, C. E 
Peterson, Christian 
Peterson, Conrad 
Pettersen, Einar E. 

J. E. V. 
Uasmussen, R. H. 
Rasmussen. L. A. 
Rudd, Berger 
Roed, Hjalmar 
Roffer, Jack 
Rontved. O. J. 
Sandberg, Theodor 
Sawdon, John W. 
Schlppman, H. C. 
Slge, Herman 
Stovner, Anders S. 
Strasdln. Paul 
Strom, Oscar H. 
Tanum. Helga 

nd, " 'harles 
1'sar, Isak 
Van Keppel. Jo- 
Van Vleet, Felix 
Walker. Jar 
Wall, Alfred 
Wamser. Christian 
Wereman. 

Wtlcke, J. W (I. 

Wllhelmson, John 
Zwart. A. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



The boilers of the former steamer "Bear" are 
still at Eureka, awaiting transportation to China. 

Survey of the Shipping Board steamer "Bloom- 
ington," launched two months ago from the 
Hammond shipyards at Eureka, has been com- 
pleted and the vessel will be in active service 
soon. 

The "Gamma," third ship launched by the 
Peninsula Shipbuilding Company of Portland, 
Ore., has ben completed and will be given in- 
spection within a few days. The "Gamma" will 
be the first ship to be delivered by the Peninsula 
company. 

Fifty-one Scotch marine boilers, worth $1,120,- 
000, are to be constructed by the Willamette 
Iron and Steel Works. The G. M. Standifer 
Construction Corporation will receive fifteen of 
the boilers for five freighters of 9500-ton type 
for the Emergency Fleet Corporation. 

Captain W. H. Logan, representing the Lon- 
don Salvage Association and recently in charge 
of the salvage operations incident to the strand- 
ing of the steamship "Canada Maru," is on a 
visit to Seattle, but declined to say whether 
he was here in connection with the libeling of 
the Japanese liner by the salvors. 

To relieve the stress of work that has accumu- 
lated in the office of the United States steam 
vessel inspection service, J. A. Moody of South 
Carolina, has arrived in Portland to act as assist- 
ant inspector of boilers. Traveling Inspector J. 
J. Meany has been recmisitioned as assistant 
inspector of hulls in the emergency. 

Camouflage for wooden ships is no longer 
necessary, according to orders received by the 
Emergency Fleet Corporation. It is believed this 
means that wooden ships — for the present, at 
least — will not be sent into the war zone. The 
"Astoria," the first ship launched by the Mc- 
Eachern Shipbuilding Company at Astoria, has 
been delivered to the Shipping Board, for 
charter to the Sudden-Christensen Company for 
operation. 

The neVvly-built wooden steamers "Annette 
Rolph," "Joan of Arc" and "Georgina Rolph" 
are to be changed to coal burners immediately, 
according to Captain N. P. Carlson, who has 
charge of all Rolph ships after they are launched. 
The fleet will be placed in operation between 
a Pacific port and one of the South Pacific 
where only coal can be purchased for fuel. 
The vessels have a carrying capacity of about 
3000 tons each. 

Captain John F. Blain, district manager, and 
Captain W. A. Magee, assistant in charge of 
wooden ship construction for the United States 
Shipping Board, at Seattle, have made a 
thorough inspection of the record ship "Aber- 
deen," a 4000-ton wood ship built at Aberdeen, 
Wash. They pronounced the ship a marvel in 
view of the speed with which she was built, it 
having required only twenty-three and one-half 
days from keel laying to commission. The 
Shipping Board officials and the Lloyd's sur- 
veyors agreed in pronouncing the vessel a per- 
fect ship. 

Captain John F. Blain, of Seattle, recently 
named as district manager of the United States 
Shipping Board, announced that Captain W. A. 
McGee would have charge of the wood ship con- 
struction of tiiis district, vice William Piggot, 
resigned. Coupled with the announcement also 
came the news that J. C. Ford, former presi- 
dent of the Pacific Steamship Company and re- 
cently assistant to William Piggot, has also 
resigned. The resignation of L. E. Geary, naval 
architect, was also accepted, and the wood and 
steel drafting departments will hereafter be 
combined. 

There will be sufficient coal for bunkering and 
also for domestic purposes this winter, accord- 
ing to James B. Smith, president of the King 
Coal Company, who returned to San Francisco 
from Utah during the week. Smith went to the 
neighboring State to investigate the coal con- 
ditions, and found that the present supply of 
more than 2000 tons sent to the port of San 
Francisco each day will be continued and that 
arrangements have been made to increase this 
amount. In the event of more than the present 
supply of coal being needed for ship bunkering, 
I he output may be increased, as arrangements 
have been made to get the necessary increase of 
labor at the mines. 

Frederick M. Dickie, son of the late George 
W. Dickie, editor of the Pacific Marine Review 
and known throughout the Pacific Coast and 
maritime circles, is dead. Dickie succumbed 
after an operation for appendicitis. He was sup- 
posed to be out of danger when blood poisoning 
set in, and the writer of many an interesting 
log of ships and things pertaining to ships 
passed away. Dickie was 36 years old and was 
• dated with the maritime interests of the 
Pacific Coast since he was a boy. His father 
was one of the most gifted naval constructors 
in the countrv and was noted, among other 
things, as the designer and builder of the famous 
battleship "Oregon." 

The use of the reduction gearing between a 
Diesel engine and a propeller has been demon- 
strated by the motor-ship Libby-Maine of the 
l.ibbv, M<\ T eil & Libby Co. to be a great suc- 



cess. This vessel was fitted some time ago with 
two 320-brake horse-power Diesel engines of the 
Dow type, with reduction gearing, the ratio 
being 2y 2 to 1. These engines pulled about 340 
horsepower on the test stand. On the sea trials 
of the vessel indicator cards were taken daily 
and the speed of the vessel corresponded ex- 
actly with that of a steam-driven ship. In this 
connection it is interesting to note that the 
present successful Danish motor-ships are 
equipped with Diesel engines of 15 per cent, 
more power than is used in a steamer of similar 
size in order to make the same speed, and this 
verifies the fact that the Dow Company has 
overcome this obstacle by using a reduction gear 
with a slow propeller speed. 

A majority of the young men employed by 
the steamship concerns of San Francisco as 
office workers may be denied exemption and sent 
to the war. All of the heads of the operating 
concerns have been advised by the Government 
to prepare lists of the men vyho are deemed 
essential to the work of the company, and it is 
understood that these will be retained. The 
places of the boys entering the military service 
will be filled chiefly by women and girls. The 
first draft took many of the boys from the 
shipping offices and the result is that there are 
now hundreds of girls employed in positions 
that were always occupied by men in the past. 
There are but a dozen young men left in the 
offices of the Matson Navigation Company at 
this time. There were formerly about two 
dozen. William Roth, vice-president and gen- 
eral manager, said that the new help is doing 
good work and there is no reason apparent why 
women will not do satisfactorily. 

A battle is to be waged against compulsory 
pilotage at the next session of the California 
Legislature, it was reported along the water- 
front. It is proposed to do away with the pilots 
unless an individual owner or operator wishes 
to avail himself of the service. Several members 
of the Pilots' Association said that they were 
preparetl to prove how absurd it would be to 
do away with compulsory pilotage. They said 
that the worst that can happen is to have a 
recurrence of what happened when the New 
York pilotage was done away with, except when 
the operator wished to employ a pilot. This 
is the story: When it was no longer obligatory 
to employ a pilot, many of the steamship com- 
panies decided that their own commanders could 
take their ships into the harbor. Within three 
weeks a big liner, worth millions, carrying cargo 
worth manv more millions, was completely 
wrecked. Many lives were lost. That settled 
the question for New York and in a few weeks 
the pilots were asked to come back. 

Captain Roger Allman and his crew of nine- 
teen men have made their last cruise and have 
been unofficially listed with the missing, to- 
gether with the Gulf Mail Steamship Company's 
steamer "San Gabriel." There is still a possibility 
that the vessel may be drifting about helplesslv 
on the Pacific, hundreds of miles off the coast 
of Lower California, but the officials of the G^'lf 
Mail company, insurance men and shipping men 
in general believe the vessel and crew were lost 
three weeks ago when the series of terrific 
"cordonazos" swept the coast of Mexico and 
destroyed the steamers "Coos Bay" and "Black- 
ford." The missing men are Captain Allman; 
first officer, C. Anderson: second officer, John 
Rosdahl: chief engineer, Otto Fallstrom: assist- 
ant engineers, J. H. Johnson and A. Malmstedt; 
purser, Frank Moffet; seamen, Victor Rozoda, 
Adam Abalin and F. Werford; winchmen. Nils 
Johansen and Franz Wilhelm; firemen, O. M. 
Olsen. J. Elberdin and H. Andreassen; gallev- 
man, F. Montero, and mess boy, John Azo. Tt 
is believed that the vessel was struck by the 
terrific blow just before rounding Cape San 
Lucas, and the steamer turned turtle and drifted 
to sea away from the path of travel. The cargo 
of lumber on deck would have kept the vessel 
afloat, it is believed. The "San Gabriel" was 
built in Alameda in 1903 at the United Engineer- 
ing Works, was 158 feet in length, 33'/. fort 
beam, 11 feet depth of hold and would cany 
1,100 measurement tons. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone, Sutter 
5807. (Advt.) 



SILAS B. AXTELL, attorney for the Eastern 
& Gulf Sailors' Assn., Marine Cooks & Stewards' 
Association. Marine Firemen, Oilers & Water 
Tenders' Union, has moved his offices to the 
ground floor of the Washington Building, One 
Broadway, New York. Entrance room J, ground 
floor. Consultation and advice on all matters 
relating to enforcement of the Seamen's Act, 
claims for Compensation or damages, will be 
given free of charge as in the past, by Mr. 
Axtell and his expert assistants, Mr. Vernon S 
Jones and Mr. Arthur Lavenburg. (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' 

FEDERATION. 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS: 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRTOR, Secretary 

1%A Lewis Street 

Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md ADOLF KILE, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 
NEW YORK CITY....GUSTAVE H. BROWN, Agent 

51 South Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa... OSCAR CHRISTIANSEN, Agt 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va...S. ALEXANDERSON, Agent 

123 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala CHARLES RAVING, Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La. .. .CHARLES HANSON, Agent 

400% Fulton Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex GEO. SCHROEDER, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I CHAS. CLAUSEN, Agent 

27 Wickenden Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS* ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y 12 South Street 

H. P. GRIFFIN, President 

W. L. CARTLEDGE, Secretary-Treasurer 

Telephone Bowling Green 8840-8841 

New York Branch D. E. GRANGE, Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 

Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass J. A. MARTIN, Agent 

6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS. La R. T. KAIZER, Agent 

228 Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK, Va WM. QUINN, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS WM. J. SIGGERS, Agent 

127 Twenty-third Street 

BALTIMORE, Md A. KILE, Sub. Agent 

802-804 South Broadway 

PHILADELPHIA. Pa..O. CHRISTIANSEN, Sub. Agt. 

206 Moravian Street 

MOBILE, Ala C. RAVING, Sub. Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex...G. SCHROEDER, Sub. Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex J. CLAUSEN, Sub. Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 40 Burling Slip 

Telephone John 396 
New York Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 164 Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN, N. Y 110 Hamilton Avenue 

Branches: 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa 138 South Second Street 

BALTIMORE, Md 802 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va 127 Twenty-third Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex 132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex 221 20th Street 

BOSTON, Mass 196 Commercial Street 

NORFOLK. Va 513 East Main Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La 400% Fulton Street 

MOBILE, Ala 104 S. Commerce Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. 1 27 Wickenden Street 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 

Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Agency: 

GLOUCESTER, Mass 163 Main Street 



LAKE DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, III 324-332 West Randolph Street 

Telephone Franklin 278 
Branches and Agencies: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone Hanover 240. 

ASHTABULA, 85 Bridge Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 44 Shelby Street 

Telephone Cherry 342. 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

sot Tin CHICAGO, III 9214 Harbor Avenue 

TOLEDO, 821 Summit Street 

(Continued on Page 11.) 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



The Seamen's Journal 

Published weekly at San Francisco 
BT THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

S. A. SILVER Business Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - - $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second- 
class mailer. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for in Section 1103. Act of Octo- 
ber ?., 1917, authorized September 7, 1918. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
59 Clay Street, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1918. 



THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE. 



Resolved, By the Sailors' Union of the Pacific 
in regular meeting assembled at headquarters, 
San Francisco, California, on October 14, that 
we extend our sincere appreciation and earnest 
thanks to President Woodrow Wilson for his 
timely and expressive message just issued to men 
ashore with sea experience; further 

Resolved, That we fully concur in every wish 
and desire as set forth in said message, but re- 
spectfully submit that the employment of Chinese 
on American ships and the maintenance of so- 
called Kalashi watches are not conducive to the 
creation of an all-American personnel; further 

Resolved, That we earnestly appeal to the 
President to take such steps as may be necessary 
to stop the further employment of Orientals on 
American ships and put an end to the Kalashi 
watch system, which is in direct contrast to the 
section of the law providing for watch and 
watch and practically destroys the opportunity 
to properly teach seamanship to the thousands 
of young men now preparing for a lifework at 
sea; further 

Resolved, That a copy of this resolution be 
forwarded to the President and to Chairman 
Hurley of the U. S. Shipipng Board. 

The foregoing resolution, unanimously 
adopted at last Monday's regular meeting of 
the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, speaks for 
itself. 

No one who has read President Wilson's 
message to seamen, published in full on the 
first page of last week's issue, can even for 
a moment entertain a doubt upon his genuine 
and practical sympathy with all the trials and 
tribulations of America's seafaring population. 

No citizen of our Republic has a keener 
understanding nor a livelier appreciation of 
the merchant seamen's real worth to the 
Nation. It was not a passing reflection which 
prompted the President to issue that memo- 
rable message. It was his deep knowledge 
and his study of men and measures which 
caused him to declare publicly that "no more 
honorable or serviceable task can come to any 
of our people than that of manning our mer- 
chant marine." 

In every sense the President's message to 
"all on land and sea who have followed a 
seafaring life" is a tirflely as well as an in- 
spiring document. The organized seamen of 
America will accept it in the fullest meaning. 
They will do all the President asks — as far 
as the shipowners will permit. But the Pres- 
ident, when he has had time to analyze the 
situation, will understand and appreciate that 
a continuance of Chinese competition and 



Kalashi watches will render null and void 
every effort to gain the desired result. 

The young men who are now being trained 
for a career of usefulness in the American 
merchant marine will not stick unless these 
conditions are changed. 

Real respect and affection for the calling 
can not be instilled into the mind of thinking 
men as long as part of our proud fleet of 
merchant ships is manned by Orientals. Nor 
ran there be proper all-around co-operation, 
much less a proper teaching of seamanship 
to the young native mariners, unless all crews 
get back to real practical sea watches. In 
the long run any other course will spell dis- 
aster to an American-manned merchant ma- 
rine. All of which is earnestly and respect- 
fully submitted to the great man of heavy 
responsibilities who guides the destiny of our 
Nation and commands the respect and ad- 
miration of all true Americans. 



SPA NTSH INFLUENZA. 



The Surgeon-General of the United States 
Public Health Service has just issued a pub- 
lication dealing with Spanish Influenza, which 
contains all known available information re- 
garding this disease. Simple methods rela- 
tive to its prevention, manner of spread, and 
care of patients, are also given. Readers 
may obtain copies of this pamphlet free of 
charge by writing to the Surgeon-General. 
United States Public Health Service, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Tt is encouraging to note in this connec- 
tion that the twelve training ships of the 
Shipping Board, with nearly 6000 Merchant 
Marine apprentices aboard, have been en- 
tirely freed of Spanish influenza. 

( Original measures were taken by the 
Board's medical staff in handling cases on the 
vessels of the Board's Atlantic training squad- 
ron. The ships were anchored at a quaran- 
tine station. As rapidly as cases developed 
they were sent ashore and treated at a field 
hospital established on a high hill. This is 
composed of specially designed cubicles, in 
which one side is glass, and half the roof 
tips back. Fresh air and sunshine was the 
basis of treatment that kept fatalities down 
to a gratifying minimum. 

Governor McCall of Massachusetts was so 
pleased with the results that he congratulated 
Chairman Plurley of the Shipping Board on 
the effective work done by the Board's medi- 
cal staff, characterizing it as "one of the real 
and big things that has been done in Massa- 
chusetts during the war." 

Governor McCall's message was as fol- 
lows: 

T want to express my keen appreciation of the 
very effective work done for the men in your 
service who were stricken with influenza and 
who" are now heing taken care of at Camp 
William A. Brooks at Corey Hill. I visited the 
place and was struck with the neatness and the 
effective way in which all concerned with the 
care of the men were working. Tt surely is a 
splendid thing and I cannot speak in too high 
terms of it. It is really a revelation as to what 
can he done. Tt seems to me as though it is 
of the real and big things that has been 
done in Massachusetts during the war and I 
want tn congratulate all who have had any part 
in accomplishing it. 

The medical authorities of Massachusetts, 
where Spanish influenza is epidemic, have 
endorsed the Shipping Board hospital idea 
and plans are being made for a group of the 
hospitals in that State, to be paid for out of a 
fund of $100,000 appropriated by the State 
to check the epidemic among the civilian 
population. 

Chairman Hurley of the Shipping Board. 
is on record with the statement that com- 



munities wishing blue-prints of the hospital 
plans could secure them by writing to Mr. 
Henrv Howard at Boston. 



THE LAST WORD. 



The closing days of this week, furnish the 
last chance for any American who wants to 
do his duty in the Fourth Liberty Loan 
drive. 

It is by this time fairly obvious to the 
most superficial student of the war just why 
< rermany let loose its extremely shrill and 
entirely insincere plea for an armistice. 

Hindenburg and Ludendorff, unable to find 
new soldiers sufficient to fill the enormous 
gaps made by Foch's bites all along their 
front, faced the necessity of shortening that 
line. 

Two years ago, Hindenburg was able to 
withdraw to the "Hindenburg line" before 
the Allies discovered what was doing. The 
movement was therefore free from pressure 
and cost the Germans practically nothing in 
men or material. 

This year, however, with allied infantry, ar- 
tillery and tanks right upon his heels along 
every inch of the line, the German has been 
forced to retreat, not withdraw, and his re- 
treat has been accomplished by the loss of 
thousands killed and prisoners and millions of 
dollars worth of munition and other supplies. 

On no front could he shake his pursuers 
off long enough to make an orderly with- 
drawal of a single unit. 

Hence the peace plea on the forlorn hope 
that a slackening of Allied pursuit, if not an 
actual armistice, would give him the few days 
necessary to straighten out the disorganized 
tangle into which Foch has thrown his 
armies. 

Fresh triumphs by the Allied troops have 
shown the Kaiser how clearly Marshal Foch 
discerned that the German peace plea was a 
cry for time. 

But there is apparent danger that one of 
the lesser objects of the request for an armis- 
tice may be successful. This was the Kaiser's 
hope that the iminence of peace would cause 
the American at home to lose his enthusiasm 
for the support of the American fighting 
men — that the man who should be buying 
Liberty Bonds would say: 

"Oh well, peace will be declared very soon 
now. Let somebody else buy Liberty Bonds." 

The Kaiser was too farsighted not to know 
that the actual approach of peace would have 
that effect — too deep-dyed in treacherous 
propaganda not to realize that the phantom 
peace his cry raised would have a similar 
effect. 

The war is not yet won. 

The Fourth Liberty Loan must be not only 
subscribed, but far oversubscribed. Buy 
Fourth Liberty Bonds, and if you have 
already bought — buy more. 



W VGE ADJUSTMENT BOARDS. 



( )\\ing to the refusal of the Railroad Ad- 
ministration and the Shipping Board to abide 
by the plan of wage standardization which 
was being developed in Washington, and 
owing to the still more important refusal of 
the International Association of Machinists 
and the Brotherhood of Carpenters to agree, 
the War Labor Policies Board has virtually 
been compelled to abandon its standard wage 
scheme. Now comes the report that the Pres- 
ident i^ to completely reorganize the Policies 
Board, in the hope of getting results by a 
new method. Al any rate, Secretary of Labor 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Wilson, in a letter to Fuel Administrator Gar- 
field, says: 

We have built up within a week or so, as the 
result of the desire of the President to secure 
more stable conditions in industry, a board the 
title of which has not yet been decided upon. It 
is a board that is to be composed of two repre- 
sentatives from each of the wage adjustment 
boards that have been created by the Federal 
Government. The purpose of that board is to 
review the proposed contracts or proposed wage 
adjustments that may be arrived at by any of 
the adjustment boards, so that when they are 
finally announced they will not be of such a 
character that they will disturb the labor condi- 
tions under the jurisdiction of the other boards. 

Satisfactory wage adjustment, in the face 
of a constantly rising cost of living, is cer- 
tainly a difficult task. But the results so far 
shown prove that organization and co-ordina- 
tion can accomplish wonders when there is 
universal confidence and respect for the head 
of the Department of Labor. Without that 
absolute confidence and faith in the two Wil- 
sons — the Chief Executive of the Nation and 
the Chief of the Department of Labor — Amer- 
ica could not possibly have done so well in 
war work of every description! 



SAVING THE "U"-BOAT'S VICTIMS. 



PROGRESSIVE SEATTLE. 



The most notable victory for municipal 
ownership in the United States in recent 
months has just been achieved in Seattle, 
Washington. By the consummation of a deal 
which has been going on between the city 
and the private owners of the traction sys- 
tem of Seattle, known as the Puget Sound 
Traction Light and Power Company, the city 
has purchased the entire system, will consoli- 
date it with lines already owned by the city 
and thus secure complete control through 
municipal ownership of its entire street car 
system. This makes Seattle the largest city in 
America that has secured complete municipal 
ownership of its street car lines. Other larger 
cities, notably San Francisco, have municipal 
street car systems, but not complete owner- 
ship as in this case. Here's success to the 
progressive people of Seattle! A municipally- 
owned transportation system conducted 
honestly and efficiently, and solely in the in- 
terest of the people, is indeed worth having. 



THE "SCARCITY" OF LABOR? 



The New Policy of Co-ordination of Salvage 

Operations Now Carried Out by the 

Allied Governments. 



When Louis F. Post, Assistant Secretary 
of Labor, was in New Orleans, recently, on 
his way back from a tour of the Pacific 
Coast, a number of sugar plantation owners 
came to the U. S. Employment Service office 
there and protested against the fact that farm 
laborers were permitted to leave the State to 
go into war industries. 

"What are you willing to pay for farm 
labor?" they were asked. 

"Ninety cents a day," was the reply. 

Later on, the Assistant Secretary learned 
that the sugar plantations are not short- 
handed, except in cases where these starvation 
terms were offered to the men. 

So, in this case, as in many others it was 
not a "scarcity" of labor, but a scarcity of 
"cheap labor." 



An epigram attributed to Congressman 
Gallivan reads: "Rum has more enemies in 
public and more friends in private than any 
other substance the world has ever known." 



By establishing a minimum wage the trade- 
union lays a foundation from which all wages 
rise. Without that bedrock all wages must 
iiu\ itably sink. 



Is it possible to recover any considerable 
number of the vessels and cargoes that have 
been sent to the bottom by the Kaiser's sub- 
marines? The fact that a special department of 
the British Admiralty has been established and 
equipped for this purpose makes an affirmative 
answer easy. During the last three years over 
400 ships have been recovered by this Salvage 
Department, according to a writer in the Lon- 
don Times. It should be noted, however, that 
most of these have been sunk in less than 
twenty fathoms. Salvage operations, the writer 
tells us, can hardly be carried on in deeper 
water than this, and hence the hopes of raising 
such vessels as the "Lusitania," sunk in deep 
water, are futile, despite the persistence with 
which they have been held out by some writers 
in the lay press. Our quotations from the Times 
article are from extracts printed in the New 
York Tribune (July 21). We read: 

"Until the autumn of the year 1915 the work 
of salvage was mainly confined to war-ships, 
but the magnitude of losses of merchant ships 
from submarine attacks made it necessary for 
the Admiralty to extend its salvage operations 
to merchant ships. The process of expansion is 
still going on. There are a considerable number 
of salvage vessels at work in home waters, in 
the Mediterranean, and on other trade routes 
where vessels are liable to submarine attacks, 
while a policy of co-ordination of salvage opera- 
tions has been carried out with the Allied Gov- 
ernments and a Joint Salvage Council called into 
existence. 

"It can be readily understood that a great deal 
of salvage work has been carried out under ex- 
tremely hazardous, conditions; yet operations 
that would not have been attempted in pre-war 
days have been undertaken, and in the majority 
of cases carried out 'successfully with the small- 
est percentage of loss. Sea conditions are a 
constant enemy of the Salvage Department. 
Work which has taken many days to carry out 
may sometimes be swept away by a single heavy 
sea. One of the greatest difficulties has, how- 
ever, arisen from the accumulation of gas in the 
holds of sunken vessels owing to the decompo- 
sition of vegetable and animal matter. Men en- 
gaged in the work have sometimes lost their 
lives. In one particular case four men were 
overcome by gas. Special trouble has arisen 
from the gas given off by grain, which develops 
sulfureted hydrogen, causing partial blindness 
and violent sickness. It is stated, however, that 
a discovery which has been made during the 
war has the effect of rendering these gases in- 
nocuous, and it is now possible to carry on the 
work freely as soon as the presence of the gases 
has been detected and the rotting cargoes 
sprayed with the special preparation of which 
the antidote consists. 

"The extent of the work done may be gathered 
from the statement that from October, 1915, 
down to the end of May, 1918, a total of 407 
ships, most of them of considerable tonnage, 
have been salved by the Admiralty Department. 
During the present year nearly 150 ships have 
passed through the hands of the department, an 
achievement which is a testimony of the in- 
creased efficiency of the work arising from the 
exploitation of new methods, the larger number 
of men employed, and as the outcome of ex- 
perience — not, as might perhaps be imagined, 
from any increased success of the enemy in the 
war on merchant shipping. The figures men- 
tioned refer, it should be added, entirely to home 
waters, and take no account of the excellent 
results which have attended salvage operations 
in other seas. 

"One or two examples may be quoted of the 
kind of work which has been undertaken by the 
salvage department in the lifting of vessels of 
sizes and weights which until now would have 
been deemed impossible. It was formerly con- 
sidered that the limit in weight for lifting from 
depth was 1600 tons, but this figure has been 
considerably exceeded with the use of wire ropes 
during the last three years. A case in point was 
that of a large Government collier, partly filled, 
which was sunk by a collision in twelve fathoms 
of water, blocking a most important channel and 
anchorage. 

"The weight of the ship, including the mud 
which had accumulated, was calculated at 3500 
tons, but it was found possible to reduce this 
weight to about 2800 tons by emptying the 
ballast tanks and forepcak. An inspection by 
divers showed that the vessel had sunk into the 
mud past the turn of the bilge, and the prospects 
were not at the outset encouraging. They were 
further diminished by the fact that another ves- 
sel of deep draft coming up the channel had 
grounded on the upper works of the collier, 
crushing down all deck erections flush with the 
deck. .After considerable difficulty sixteen 9-inch 
wire ropes, having a guaranteed breaking strain 
of 250 tons, were got under the collier and at- 
tached to the lifting craft. 

"\\ hen i\ erything had been prepared the 

water was emptied from the ballast lank-, and 

the I : by compressed air and the first lift 

ucci .fully accomplished. Calculations showed 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 14, 1918. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., Ed. Andersen presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping good. Full Shipwreck Benefit 
was awarded to ten members of the crews of the 
S. S. "Coos Bay" and S. S. "Blackford." 

HARRY INGWARDSEN, 

Secretary pro tern. 

Maritime Hall Bldg., 59 Clay Street. Tel. 
Kearny 2228. 



St. 



_; Victoria, B. C, Oct. 7, 1918. 
No meeting. Shipping slow; men scarce. 

J. ETCHELLS, Agent. 
Room 11, de Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 



Vancouver, B. C, Oct. 7, 1918. 
Shipping fair. 

WM. HARDY, Agent. 
58 Powell Street E. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. 
Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 7, 1918. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects fair. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 7, 1918. 
Shipping medium. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 7, 1918. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping fair. 

ED. ROSENBERG, Agent. 
P. O. Box 280. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Oct. 7, 1918. 
Shipping good; prospects good. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
88'A Third Street. Tel. Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 7, 1918. 
Shipping good; members scarce. 

HARRY OHLSON, Agent. 
128^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 30, 1918. 
Shipping good; prospects fair. 

R. H. BLACKWOOD, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 10, 1918. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Ed. Andersen in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping good. The full Shipwreck 
Benefit was ordered paid to six members 
wrecked on the steamships "Coos Bay" and 
"Blackford." 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market Street. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 3, 1918. 
Shipping good. Nominated officers for the en- 
suing term. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203. Phone Main 
2233. P. O. Box 214. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 2, 1918. 
No meeting. Shipping fair; not many arrivals. 

HARRY POTHOFF," Agent. 
Sepulveda Bldg., 128^ Sixth Street. Phone, 
Home 115; Sunset 66 W. 



DIED. 

Severin Carlsen, No. 1627, a native of Norway, 
age 31. Died at San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 11, 
1918. 

Nicolai Petersen, No. 1235, a native of Russia, 
age 33. Died at San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 13, 
1918. 



A fleet of wooden vessels is being built in the 
Philippines, according to advices received by the 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. The 
largest built is an auxiliary schooner of 500 tons 
net, just launched at Bolinao, Pangasinan. It 
has three masts and has been christened the 
"James W. Simmie" in honor of Captain Simmic 
of this city, whose son, George Simmie, is a 
member of Simmie & Grilks, ship builders. The 
vessel will be equipped with a 200 horse-power 
I'.oliinlci in: in. i . 1 1 > i . i i 1 1 Simmie expects to 
!• tve for Manila next week for a short visit. 
The old veteran was in command of vessels 
out of this port for twenty-five years. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



OUR WASHINGTON LETTER. 

(By Laurence Todd.) 



Far above all other events of the week 
towers the President's statement of the pur- 
pose of the United States to enforce the 
will of the "workaday people" of the world 
as the condition of ending this war and pre- 
venting future wars. 

In his recent New York address Presi- 
dent Wilson won the eternal gratitude of 
the labor movements of America, of Great 
Britain, of France and of Italy, and must 
have aroused the hopes of the working class 
of Japan, when he tore aside the trappings 
of diplomatic make-believe and pointed his 
finger straight at the cabinet ministers of 
Europe. lie made himself spokesman of 
these labor movements when he called upon 
the ministries of all countries, enemy and 
entente alike, to come out and say just what 
are their aims, and whether they agree that 
the final peace shall do justice to all, and 
give special advantages to none. He spoke 
as a man who has heard the thunderous 
march of organized labor, moving in inter- 
national solidarity, and who thrills to that 
music. 

The British Trade Union Congress and 
the French and Italian labor movements have 
called upon their cabinet ministers, time and 
again, to define in plain terms what they will 
demand at the peace conference after the 
war. Will Premiers Lloyd George and 
Clemenceau and Orlando follow the unselfish 
program laid down repeatedly by President 
Wilson? Will they ask only for justice, or 
will they join together in brushing aside the 
program of America as visionary, and pro- 
ceed to force upon the world a revision of 
the map and of military arrangements that 
will quickly breed new wars? Now, when 
the Allies are winning tremendous victories. 
when Bulgaria is on her knees, when Turkey 
seems on the point of giving up, and when 
the Allied armies are hammering their way 
through the Hindenburg line from the Chan- 
nel to the Alps — now is the time that the 
spirit of selfish nationalistic conquest is 
most dangerous. And at this time the Presi- 
dent of the United States has stepped for- 
ward and blocked the path of any possible 
imperialism. 

Does he needlessly offend the clever states- 
men of Europe? 

Hardly. He is saving some of them from 
the most terrible mistake of ten centuries. 
He is not saving the German or the Austrian 
or the Bulgar or Turk leaders ; he lets them 
go their way to disaster. "Outlaws" he calls 
the German imperialists. He says truly that 
the league of nations will let them earn its 
confidence after the peace is established. 
But to the statesmen of the entente he points 
out that the time is ripe for pledges from 
each of them to the world of the masses. 
They can refuse to speak — at their peril. If 
they do not yet know that President Wil- 
son's program of justice for humanity — jus- 
tice for "those who struggle in the ranks" — 
is endorsed by the workers of the world, 
then these statesmen are toying with very 
dangerous explosives. 

"Tt is the peculiarity of this great war." 
he says, "that while statesmen have seemed 
to cast about for definitions of their pur- 
poses and have sometimes seemed to shift 
their ground and their point of view, the 
thought of the mass of men, whom statesmen 
are supposed to instruct and lead, has grown 
more and more unclouded, more and more 



certain of what it is they are fighting for. 
National purposes have fallen more and more 
into the background and the common purpose 
of enlightened mankind has taken their place. 

"The counsels of plain men have become 
on all hands more simple and straightfor- 
ward and more unified than the counsels of 
sophisticated men of affairs, who still retain 
the impression that they are playing a game 
of power and playing for high stakes. That 
is why I have said this is a peoples' war, 
and not a statesmen's. Statesmen must fol- 
low the clarified common thought or be 
broken." 

He does not say that revolution threatens, 
in any country whose labor movement is 
pleading for the program he is urging; he 
merely remarks that statesmen who resist the 
common people in these days will be 
"broken." 

"I take this to be the significance." he 
goes on, "of the fact that assemblies and as- 
sociations of many kinds, made up of plain 
workaday people, have demanded, almost 
every time they came together, and are still 
demanding, that the leaders of their govern- 
ments declare to them plainly what it is — 
exactly what it is — that they were seeking 
in this war, and what they think the items 
in the final settlement should be. They are 
not yet satisfied with what they have been 
told." 

Is he Speaking for the British or the 
French or the Italian laboring masses? In 
any case he speaks for the Allied nations, 
to the politicians in Europe whose failure to 
be frank has made those peoples turn to 
the President of the United States for guid- 
ance. He is not disturbing the unity of the 
Entente; he is all at once molding it into 
one vast, popular internationally. The 
echoes of his challenge to these statesmen to 
be statesmanlike will be heard in every trade 
union meeting from Scotland to Sicily. There 
will be a sudden panic among the scheming 
politicians who had thought of a hucksters' 
settlement of the war. They will find that 
they have to reckon with their peoples, and 
their peoples are all solidly behind this ideal- 
ist, the President of the United States. 

What is the meaning of this challenge to 
European politics? 

Bluntly, it is a prophecy of a Europe of 
republics. 

That is to say, a Europe in which organ- 
ized labor will finally be the majority power 
in every parliament, every ministry, every 
branch of political and industrial control. 
* * * 

Conferences between labor officials and the 
Secretary of Labor and heads of all the Gov- 
ernment departments, bureaus and boards that 
deal with labor conditions have been in prog- 
ress here for the past two weeks, in an attempt 
to "stabilize" wages. That's an old subject; 
it has been brought up in various ways ever 
since we entered the war, and has proven too 
hard a nut to crack. Beautiful plans are 
made for setting a fair minimum wage and 
a reasonable maximum wage for war work 
of certain kinds, under conditions existing at 
a given time and place. But before any 
agreement can be reached the cost of food 
and of house rent has advanced, and the 
whole thing is spoiled. 

The thing chiefly desired by the Govern- 
ment seems to be a guaranty against extor- 
tionate wage demands in any district, and 
against the payment by one branch of the 
war organization of so large a wage as to 
pull men away from other branches. The 



labor men who have been in the conferences 
are not confident of a solution. They see 
a possibility of the fixing of a maximum 
wage that will be fair enough in most parts 
of the country but will come too close down 
to the cost of living in certain sections. 

* * * 

In Bridgeport, all's well that ends well. 
The latest from that troubled town is the 
interpretation given the Eidlitz award on 
general industrial conditions last Monday by 
four members of the War Labor Board — 
Messrs. Taft, Walsh, Savage and Osborne. 
This "inteq>retation" gives the union ma- 
chinists who struck recently and were sent 
back to work by President Wilson, every 
point for which they quit the shops. 

Nine points are named in the Board's rul- 
ings. They provide that the companies shall 
not interfere in the selection of shop and 
craft committees; that back pay at the higher 
rates must be given all employes who came 
into the shops up to July 1. instead of only 
to those who were employed before May 1 ; 
that the strikers shall have proportionate 
representation in the industrial convention 
that was chosen by the non-union workers 
while the strike was on ; that the Examiner 
for the Board shall immediately investigate 
charges of discrimination, and shall immedi- 
ately reinstate employes pending such inves- 
tigation ; that all strikers returning to work 
at the President's request shall have the right 
of reinstatement in their old positions; that 
the Local Board of Mediation and Concilia- 
tion after its election shall create specialized 
craft boards, or other boards to work out 
such problems as classification and minimum 
rates of pay. 

This last is the meat in the cocoanut. The 
machinists get a special board to present a 
classification scale of wages. 

* * * 

On Monday last, the membership of the 
International Association of Machinists 
passed the 275,000 mark. This is a gain of 
200,000 in a little over two years. Office 
mail at the headquarters here is now 24 days 
behind — so difficult has been the job of get- 
ting help and office space to handle the flood 
of reports and applications. Lodges in every 
State are rapidly growing, and along with 
the skilled mechanics the organization is be- 
ing forced to take in thousands of the new 
men who have been brought into the war 
industries with only a very slight knowledge 
of tools. The old-time machinists who are 
proud of their manual skill and the tradi- 
tions of their craft have to choke down many 
a groan as they witness this dilution of their 
trade made necessary by the war, but they 
have no alternative to offer. The Govern- 
ment has given every skilled man the chance 
to get into the shops. If thousands of them 
have chosen to carry guns, then thousands 
of raw mechanics must work at the bench. 
and the lathe. Once there, they come logi- 
cally into the union. 

* * * 

John I. Nolan of San Francisco. Con- 
gressman and union iron molder, has put 
through the House, after three years of 
fighting, his bill giving a minimum wage of 
2>7]/ 2 cents an hour, or $3 a day to all hour 
and day workers under the Government, and 
$90 a month to all workers paid by the 
month. Sixty thousand men and women are 
benefited by this bill, which has a good 
chance in the Senate. 

During the debate Rep. Sabath of Chicago 
called attention to the fact that Borland of 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Kansas City, who tried to force the Govern- 
ment employes to work an additional six 
hours a week, and to prevent their getting 
a living wage, was beaten on the labor issue 
in the recent primary, by a two-to-one vote. 
Borland himself came to Nolan to ask how 
he should vote on an amendment to the bill. 
His head-on collision with the labor move- 
ment seems to have impressed Borland, at 
last. It has impressed the House, too. This 
time not one of the anti-labor crowd took 
any of the two hours of time allowed for 

opponents of the measure. 
* * * 

Congressman Miller of Duluth, super-pa- 
triot and labor-hater, is going to be replaced 
in the House by a railroad engineer named 
Carss, nominated by a labor convention. 
There has just been published in his dis- 
trict a copy of a letter he wrote on the day 
before our declaration of war, in which Mil- 
ler said that "I have not believed circum- 
stances have occurred justifying a declaration 
of war against Germany," and that "if war 
eventually occurs, Germany should declare 
it." Also "However, the President has the 
power and he has now exercised it to commit 
this country to war immediately." 



"CHAOTIC RUSSIA." 



It is interesting to note the frequency with 
which the above phrase is used in reference 
to Russia and how often it is employed as 
a final reason for military occupation of that 
country. The Bolshevik power is less than 
a year old. It has to contend with a shat- 
tered economic system inherited from the 
Czarist autocracy. Aside from its tremen- 
dous economic problems it has had to face 
numerous plots, conspiracies and rebellions, 
all of which have collapsed like a house of 
cards. In addition to this, it has remained 
an Ishmael among the nations, isolated and 
friendless, and constantly attacked by inter- 
national finance and imperialist groups in all 
parts of the world. Yet it has survived all 
these difficulties. Never in all history has 
there been a government that has displayed 
such vitality in the midst of such internal 
and external foes. 

Our own history may be drawn upon as 
an illustration. We have just been celebrat- 
ing the one hundred and forty-second anni- 
versary of the Declaration of Independence, 
the war cry of American revolutionists 
against an alien governing control. July 4, 
1776, may be assigned as the beginning of. 
the revolution, though it had been ferment- 
ing for years before that date. Following 
it came the Continental Congress, the gov- 
ernment of the revolutionary period, which 
did not surrender its powers until the Con- 
gress under the new Constitution met in 
1780. Peace did not come with the admis- 
sion of defeat by Great Britain. In fact, all 
competent historians admit that chaos fol- 
lowed. Instead of a united thirteen colonies, 
we had thirteen independent sovereignties 
working at cross purposes with each other. 
Not only was there this division between the 
colonies, but within many of them there 
were debtors' revolts of poor farmers and 
workers that threatened to overthrow all the 
governments of New England. The most 
formidable of these revolts, Shay's rebellion 
in Massachusetts, drove the leading men to 
the Philadelphia convention that framed the 
Constitution. Even after the assembling of 
the first Congress, in 1789, another rebellion 
l»i( ike out in Pennsylvania among the farmers 
of the western counties, and it required a 



threat of Federal military power to sup- 
press it. 

In other words, it required thirteen years 
for our revolutionists to establish a govern- 
ment that was stable. Like the Russian 
revolutionists, they had counter-revolutions 
to contend with, but, unlike the Russians, 
they had no powers of international finance 
and imperialist interventionists to meet. 
There were no organized groups in Canada 
planning invasion from the north. The 
United States was isolated by its geographi- 
cal situation ; Russia is isolated by withhold- 
ing of recognition by other governments. 
Russia is spewed out as "chaotic" by our 
bourgeois press because it has not completely 
accomplished under less favorable conditions 
what required thirteen years to accomplish 
in this country. 

Another historial analogy may be noticed. 
The Civil War ended with the surrender of 
Lee at Appomattox, in April, 1865. Yet 
every school boy knov/s that it was at least 
ten years later that "chaos" gave way to 
conditions that may be described as orderly. 
Here, again, there were revolts and riots in 
the Southern States, but the country re- 
mained isolated, with no threatened invasions 
from any quarter and no international in- 
tervention groups to contend with in foreign 
capitals. It" required thirteen years in the 
one case and ten years in the other to 
establish orderly processes of civilized life, 
yet the Russians meet a storm of denuncia- 
tion because they have not done likewise 
within less than one year. 

Changes like the American revolution, the 
Civil War and the Russian revolution are 
not pink tea affairs, as this bourgeois press 
knows. They require time to heal wounds 
and to reconstruct society, and time will be 
required by every nation now at war. Many 
years will cover the readjustment period, and 
during this time disturbances will occur. But 
the Russians are expected to do in a year 
what has always required a decade or more 
to do. The future will require it this time, 
also. It will be no pink tea affair in which 
social and economic institutions will reas- 
semble in orderly fashion at the command 
of a swarm of press clowns. What the latter 
want in Russia, however, is not the order 
of a strifeless society based upon equality 
of opportunity and the social welfare of all, 
but the "order" of bourgeois society that 
guarantees Russia as an exploiting field for 
native and foreign finance and capital. The 
"chaos" of such societies is transformed into 
a blessing by this press and accepted with 
pious resignation wherever it prevails, and 
no historical analogies will avail to divert it 
from its service to reaction and voicing the 
views of its wealthy investors. — New York 
Call. 



A "LADY" SKIPPER. 



The following story comes to us from 
the "Woman's Column" of The Worker, 
published in Brisbane, Queensland, Aus- 
tralia: 

"Elise Belluomini, a pretty Italian girl, 
whose home is at Viarcggio, enjoys the 
honor of being the first regularly appointed 
captain in her country's merchant marine. 

"Her dreams as a child followed the pic- 
turesque sailing ships, which she watched 
from the outpost beside the blue Tyrrhe- 
nian Sea, and gradually her musings trans- 
formed themselves into a determination to 
become a sailor. The good folk of Viareg- 
gio looked askance at her when she first 



spoke of her resolution, and the older and 
more superstitious of the population did 
not hesitate to declare her possessed by 
the devil. 

"Persisting in her idea, however, Elise 
gained the ear of a veteran sea captain, 
through whose intermediary she obtained 
a recommendation to the naval authorities 
at Leghorn, and eventually she was allowed 
to follow the courses at the Nautical Col- 
lege. The girl made astonishingly rapid 
progress in her studies, mastering easily 
the most complicated problems of naviga- 
tion, and she has just obtained her cap- 
tain's certificate. 

"Signorina Belluomini relates her success 
in a letter to a writer in the Petit Journal, 
Paris. She is to be appointed to command 
a ship, and seems to have no doubt of her 
ability to inspire confidence in her crew. 
She writes : 

' 'Where shall I be sent? I do not know, 
but I am ready for everything. I join the 
marine in troubled times, and I know sea- 
men risk their lives every day. But I will 
show my crew that a woman can be as 
brave as a man.' " 



"Observe all men — thyself most." — Ben- 
jamin Franklin. 

Labor's Economic Platform 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor dis- 
putes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight 
hours per day on all Federal, State or municipal 
work, and not less than the prevailing per diem 
wage rate of the class of employment in the 
vicinity where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man-suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or 
compartments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain. 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



of Bethlehem, and Edward Davies, for 
eight years a member of the State Cos- 
sacks, is chief of police. These officials, 
with the aid of other corporation influ- 
ences, made it impossible for the Machin- 
ists' Union to hire a hall for meeting pur- 
poses. This developed such an acute situ 
ation that the Federal Department of Jus- 
tice notified the unionists that it would 
help them to secure a hall. 



Workers in Dusty Trades. 

In a pamphlet on "Mortality From Re- 
spiratory Diseases in Dusty Trades," the 
Federal Bureau of Labor Statistics esti- 
mates that there are 3,264,500 males and 
o73.478 females working in so-called dusty 
industries, trades and occupations, which 
are arranged in seven large groups for the 
purpose of ready reference. 

While it is agreed that the mortality 
from tuberculosis has gradually declined 
from an average rate of 32 per 10,00(1 Foi 
large American cities for the five years 
ending with 1884, to 16.1 per 10,000 for 
the five years ending with 1914, this re- 
duction has, only to a limited degree, af- 
fected the persons most seriously con- 
cerned — the workmen and work women 
employed in dusty trades. 

It is estimated that approximately 10 
per cent, of the nation's workers are em- 
ployed under conditions more or less detri- 
mental to health and life on account of 
atmospheric impurities. 

Authorities recognize metallic dust as 
the most serious health hazard. The term 
"metallic dust" is applied to particles of 
iron, steel, brass, gold, silver, bronze, lead, 
arsenic and other metallic substances. 
Typical employments with metallic dust 
exposure arc file cutters, coppersmiths, en- 
gravers, printers, lithographers, nail makers, 
machinists, gunsmiths, etc. Persons in all 
of these employments or industries are 
subject, as a general rule, to an exception- 
ally high mortality' rate from all causes, 
and a high specific death rate from pul- 
monale' tuberculosis. 



To Adjust Railroad Disputes. 

Director General of Railroads McAdoo 
calls attention to his orders covering ad- 
justment of wage disputes. 

"It should be understood by railroad 
employes," said the Federal official, "that 
it is impracticable to give interpretation on 
ex parte statements to the thousands who 
request information as to the manner in 
which wage orders should be applied in 
individual cases. Operating officials of the 
railroads are required to place wage orders 
in effect fairly and equitably, and should 
differences of opinion arise necessitating a 
formal interpretation, the matter will be 
disposed of in the following manner: 

"When a wage order is placed in effect 
in a menner with which an employe, or the 
employe's committee disagrees, a joint 
statement quoting the language of the 
wage order, and including the contentions 
of employes and the contentions of officials, 
signed by the representatives of the em- 
ployes and the officials, will be trans- 
mitted to the director of labor, who will 
record and transmit same to the Board 
of Railroad Wages and Working Condi- 
tions, which will promptly investigate and 



make recommendation to the Director Gen- 
eral. Upon the receipt of interpretation 
from the Director General, the director of 
labor will transmit such interpretation to 
t!u' Railway Boards of Adjustment for 
their information and guidance in the ap- 
plication of such interpretation to existing 
conditions or to questions arising from 
the incorporation of the order as so in- 
terpreted into existing agreements on all 
railroads under Federal control. As oc- 
casion demands, all interpretations will be 
printed and given general publicity for the 
purpose of communicating the information 
to all concerned, and thus avoiding the 
necessity of duplication of interpretations." 



Army Uses Much Wool. 

General Wood, Acting Quartermaster 
General of the Army, states that for the 
last fiscal year the Army. Navy and Marine 
Corps used over 266,000,000 pounds of 
wool, and 17,500,000 pounds were used 
for semi-governmental use. 

"We set up at the end of each month," 
lie said, "a report showing everything in 
the states from the factory to the man's 
back. We have a record of what clothing 
is in transit from the factory to the depot, 
what is in transit to the docks, and what 
is in the holds of the ships going over to 
France. I assume if the men hadn't been 
supplied we'd have heard of it. There is 
no excuse for the Quartermaster Depart- 
ment falling down. The ordnance and air 
craft had to design— and didn't have the 
production. They had to build new plants 
and new factories. With us it was simply 
the question of turning over the plants 
from making civilian clothes to uniforms." 

Tn reply to a question regarding grafting 
raincoat manufacturers the Army official 
said that these contracts have been an- 
nulled and the material confiscated. 

"It slowed up production some — lost us 
a month in production," he said, "but it is 
1 letter to have no raincoats at all than de- 
fective ones." 

Liberty Loan Statistics. 

The Treasury Department has issued a 
table showing results of the third Libert} 
Loan subscriptions according to the twelve 
Reserve Bank Districts, which cover the 
entire country. These districts were as- 
signed a certain quota of the $3,000,000.- 
000 issue, which was oversubscribed $L- 
158,599,100. This is exclusive of treasury 
subscriptions which total $17,017,750. Every 
district oversubscribed its quota, the Min- 
neapolis district leading with 172 per cent. 
Xew York was lowest with 123.91 per 
cent. 

Based on an estimated population of 
103,620,273 in the United States, 17.7 per 
cent, of the entire population subscribed 
to this loan. The Philadelphia district led 
with 25.2 per cent., followed by Chicago, 
with 24.7 per cent.; Minneapolis, 23.6 per 
cent.: Xew York, 23.2 per cent.; Boston, 
21.7 per cent.; San Francisco, 21.1 per 
cent.; Kansas City, 16 per cent.; Cleve- 
land, 15.4 per cent.; St. Louis and Dallas. 
12.7 per cent.; Richmond, 9.2 per cent.; 
Atlanta. 5.8 per cent. 



SAVING THE "U"-BOAT'S VICTIMS. 

(Continued from Page 7.) 



FOREST TRAILS IN NORTHWEST. 



that the load lifted was 2750 tons, and the four 
lifting vessels engaged in the work carried the 
ship a distance of over one mile inshore, clear 
of tin anchorage. As a result of further lifting 
operations the vessel was gradually moved until 
her decks were almost dry at low water. The 
final stage of the work was to send divers down 
to patch the damage roughly and to pump out 
the water and float the vessel." 

Another vessel recovered had been torpedoed 
while carrving a cargo, mainly of foodstuffs, 
valued at £3,000,000. An attempt to beach her 
was only partly successful, and at low water the 
shelter deck was just awash. It was decided to 
use submersible motor-pumps, which can be low- 
ered from the decks of the salvage steamer to 
any position under water and worked by elec- 
tricity. Says the writer: 

"The damage in this particular instance was 
of somewhat extensive character, the plating 
having been destroyed over an area forty feet 
long by twenty-eight feet deep. Measures were 
taken to drain off the water from some of the 
holds into the stoke-hold and engine-room, and 
the forward 'tween-deck hatches having been 
closed up and made watertight, the motor-pumps 
were placed in the stoke-hold and set to work. 

"Ft was then possible to pump out the stoke- 
hold, engine-room, and some of the after-holds. 
A considerable quantity of cargo was next dis- 
charged and pumping operations were put in 
band in the forward shelter-deck. This still left 
' i lower holds full of water, but the ship had 
been lightened to an extent which enabled her 
to he put into a better position on the beach, 
and some thousands of tons of cargo having 
discharged, she was floated off and put into 
dry- dock. 

"The Admiralty Salvage Department is not 
only responsible for war-salvage, but controls 
the operations of all private companies, and, in 
association with shipping insurance interests and 
Lloyd's, undertakes the work arising out of ma- 
rine casualties in all parts of the world. Ship- 
salvage methods may not have been revolution- 
ized, but they have been developed to a higher 
degree of efficiency than was considered possible 
even by those engaged in the business." 



VICTOR HUGO ON THE MOB. 



The United States Forest Service main- 
tains 4350 miles of trail in Oregon and 
4500 miles in Washington for fire pro- 
tective purposes. 



"Foex urbis," Cicero exclaimed; mob, 
Burke adds indignantly ; a crowd, a multi- 
tude, a population, these words are quickly 
uttered; but no matter! What do I care 
that they go barefoot? They cannot read; 
all the worse. Will you abandon them on 
that account? Will you convert their dis- 
tress into a curse? Cannot light penetrate 
these masses? Let us revert to that cry 
of light and insist upon it. Light, light! 
Who knows whether this opaqueness may 
not become transparent, for are not revo- 
lutions themselves transfigurations? Come, 
philosophers, teach, enlighten, illumine, 
think aloud, speak aloud, run joyfully into 
the sunshine, fraternize with the public 
places, announce the glad tidings, spread 
pamphlets around, proclaim the right, sing 
the Marseillaise, sow enthusiasm, and pluck 
green branches from the oaks ! Make a 
whirlwind of the idea! This crowd may be 
sublimated, so let us learn how to make use 
of that vast conflagration of principles and 
virtues which crackles and bursts into flame 
at certain hours. These bare feet, these 
naked arms, these rags, this ignorance, this 
abjectness, this darkness may be employed 
for the conquest of the ideal. Look through 
the people and you will perceive the truth : 
the vile sand which you trample underfoot, 
when cast into the furnace and melted, will 
become splendid crystal, and, by its aid, 
Galileo and Newton discover planets. 



The "London Daily Mail" has renewed the 
offer of $50,000 to the first person who will 
fly across the Atlantic Ocean from any point 
in the United States, Canada, or Newfound- 
land to Great Britain or Ireland, or vice 
versa, in seventy-two consecutive hours. This 
offer was made in 1913, but was suspended 
on account of the war. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



PREHISTORIC ASTRONOMY. 



For many years two pairs of holes in 
the walls of the celebrated prehistoric Casa 
Grande Ruin in Arizona have given rise 
to much speculation not only on the part 
of tourists but of archaeologists also. The 
holes are about an inch and a half in 
diameter and are bored through walls four 
feet thick. They occur in pairs, each pair 
on opposite sides of a great central room. 
The holes in each pair are in line with 
each other, so that one standing in a dark 
first floor room behind the central room 
may look through the innermost hole, 
across the central room, and through the 
outermost hole at the sky. One pair points 
due east. The other pair points north at a 
declining angle. 

The interesting people who built this 
most ancient of pueblos have left no traces 
behind them. One can only imagine, by 
analogy from better known neighborhood 
races of a later period, what their civiliza- 
tion may have been. That they were a 
deeply religious people and worshipers of 
the sun is an assumption. Recently an in- 
teresting theory has been advanced to ex- 
plain the holes. 

According to this theory these holes 
form what might be called a seasonal 
clock. Twice a year, once as the sun works 
north and once as it works south along 
the eastern horizon, it rises in line with 
the eastward pointing holes and for one 
morning, for possibly three minutes, throws 
a bar of light into the dark inner room. 

From this the ceremonial calendar could 
be dated and certain festivals would fall 
on the same day year after year. One is 
reminded of Stonehenge in England where 
the sun at its summer solstice shone down 
a long alley of stone monuments upon an 
altar placed in the center of a series of 
circles of stones. 

We come now to the northern pair of 
holes which arc placed in the north wall 
of the central room and the corresponding 
outer wall of the building. This pair trends 
downward and to the east so that they 
never overlooked the defensive wall which 
surrounded the group of buildings around 
the Casa Grande. At first thought this pre- 
cludes any astronomical use, but the in- 
genious theorist has an explanation for 
even this condition of affairs. 

If we grant the former inhabitants the 
use of an instrument of reflection, which 
need be no more complicated than a plain 
bowl of water, then it is easy to imagine 
the medicine man in the dark of the night, 
when he comes to a certain point in his 
ceremony, putting a bowl of water at a 
predetermined point on the plaza outside 
and so reflecting the light of some bright 
star in the northern heavens up through 
these holes into the central room of the 
Casa Grande. 

The problem is now being studied as to 
which bright star near that particular angle 
could have been moved from that exact 
angle by the precession of the equinoxes, 
and it is hoped by this point to establish 
the date when the Casa Grande was in- 
habited. 

How long ago this was is uncertain, 
moderate guesses beginning with 600 years 
and more radical guesses going to 1000 or 
more years. 

The Casa Grande itself, however, ancient 
though it is, was the most recent of its 



group. The evidence seems to show that 
an older group of ruins was abandoned 
about the time the Casa Grande was built. 



NORWAY'S CONCRETE SHIPS. 



Norway is racing with America to see 
which country will gain the honor of build- 
ing the first concrete vessel that will cross 
the Atlantic Ocean. America is far in the 
van of the shipbuilding world in regard to 
the number of concrete ships and their 
size that are being constructed at the pres- 
ent time. But Mr. Nick Fougner, president 
of the Fougner Concrete Shipbuilding Co. 
(Inc.), Christiania, Norway, states that he 
hopes to cross the Atlantic on one of the 
larger boats which his company is building 
within the next two or three months. 

The concrete ship is fast coming to the 
front in Norway. The shortage of wood 
and steel in that country has made it nec- 
essary for shipbuilders to turn to the con- 
crete vessel in order to offset the losses 
suffered by the depredations of the U-boats, 
if they desire to continue both their coast- 
wise and transatlantic trade. 

The "Stier," a 1,000-ton concrete vessel, 
recently built by the shipyards of the Foug- 
ner Concrete Shipbuilding Co., is a pioneer 
of the type of concrete vessel that is now 
under construction in Norway. The vessel 
is 145 feet over all, 27 feet 6 inches beam, 
15 feet 9 inches molded depth. It is 
equipped with an internal combustion 320- 
horse-power motor, and has four water- 
tight transverse bulkheads of concrete, 
which, with a reasonable cargo, makes the 
ship practically unsinkable. 

At present the Fougner Co. has under 
contract 12 additional seagoing concrete 
motor ships, varying in size from 200 to 
3,000 tons deadweight, and they have built 
and launched about 25 floating craft of var- 
ious types, including tugs, lighters, motor 
ships, and dry docks. 

It is expected that the Norwegian build- 
ers will adopt the new protective coating 
which, when applied to concrete, makes 
the life of a concrete vessel equal in dura- 
bility to that of a steel vessel. This dis- 
covery, so important in the construction of 
concrete vessels, has been the result of the 
research work of the engineers of the 
Emergency Fleet Corporation. 



SULPHUR IN ALASKA. 



The known sulphur deposits of Alaska are 
of volcanic origin and lie in the belt of 
active volcanoes that extends through the 
Aleutian Islands and Alaska Peninsula. The 
deposits on Unalaska and Akun Islands and 
near Stepovak Bay, on Alaska Peninsula, 
were examined in the summer of 1917 by, 
A. G. Maddren, of the United States Geo- 
logical Survey, Department of the Interior. 
The examinations showed that though there 
is some sulphur at each place examined there 
is little hope that any of it can be profitably 
mined at present or in the near future, for 
the deposits are of small areal extent and 
are prohahly shallow, supplies and labor are 
not at hand, the open season is short, the 
difficulties of transporting the material from 
the mines to ships would be great, and the 
haul to the larger markets would he long. 
\ brief summary of the more important re- 
sults of the investigation of these deposits 
has been published and will be sent on ap- 
plication to the Director of the Geological 
Survey, Washington, D. C. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Page 5.) 
LAKE DISTRICT— (Continued). 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

Branches: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO. Ill 4 E. Austin Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, Mich 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, Wis 309 Tower Avenu* 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

TOLEDO, Ohio 821 Summit Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 35 West Eagle Street, 

Telephone Seneca 896. 

J. M. SECOND, Secretary. 

Branches: 

CHICAGO, 111 406 N. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND, Ohio 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio 85 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

CONNEAUT HARBOR. Or>) 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, Ohio 821 Summit Street 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 
Marine Hospitals: 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 



Relief 
Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor. O. 
Buffalo. N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, WUs. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludlngton, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 
Erie, Pa, 
Menominee. Mich. 



Stations: 
Ogdensburg, N. T. 
Oswego, N. Y. 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie. Mich. 
Sheboygan. Wis. 
Superior, WIl. 
Toledo, O. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 59 Clay Street 

Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C 1424 Government Street 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 1365 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 North 30th Street 

SEATTLE, Wash.. 84 Seneca Street. P. O. Box «6 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box < 

PORTLAND, Ore 88% 3rd Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU. H. T P. O. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 64 Pike St. Viaduct, P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal.. 613 Beacon Street, P. O. Box 674 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 

PORTLAND, Ore 98 Second Street N 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 64 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 42 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 1SI 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC. 

Headquarters. 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada P. O. Box 968 

KETCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 

PETERSBURG Ala 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
i ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 131 



12 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Labor Newt 



The fur workers' unions in New 
York City are voting on the plan 
to raise a $100,000 defense fund. 
Officers favor the proposal. They 
say it will assist in holding re- 
cent wage increases. 

Reports to the Federal Bureau of 
Mines from every State except Ken- 
lucky show that 192 coal miners 
were killed in May of this year. 
In the same month last year there 
were 148 fatalities. 

The Wisconsin State Industrial 
Commission is holding public hear- 
ings on the question of women's 
wages. Several months ago the State 
Federation of Labor and other or- 
ganizations petitioned the commission 
to establish a living -wage for 
women. 

Several wood working plants in 
Minneapolis have jumped the Citi- 
zen-,' Alliance reservation and signed 
an eight-hour agreement with the 
Cabinet Makers' Union. Wages of 
50 cents an hour are also agreed 
to. ' tther concerns that insist on 
non-union conditions now see their 
employes leaving this industry for 
work that will pay a living wage. 

A sub-committee of the National 
Adjustment Commission, which 
handles disputes in the loading and 
unloading of vessels, has ruled that 
wage rates for four locals of long- 
shoremen in Chicago shall be in- 
creased from 65 to 75 cents an hour. 
The commission that made this 
award consisted of representatives 
of the Government, the International 
Longshoremen's Association and the 
Lumber Carriers' association. 

Postmaster General Rurleson has 
appointed a committee "to investi- 
gate the working conditions of and 
wages paid to employes of the tele- 
graph and telephone companies, and 
report as to what improvements, if 
any, should he made in the work- 
ing conditions, the wages which 
should he paid the various classes 
of employes and the feasibility of 
standardizing the same." The com- 
mittee consists of William S. Ryan, 
Assistant Superintendent, Division of 
Postofnce Service; John R. Colpoys, 
Special Agent, Department of Labor, 
and editor of the Washington (D. 
C.) Trades Unionist; U. N. Bethell, 
First Vice-President American Tele- 
graph & Telephone Company, F. 
R. MacKinnon. United States Inde- 
pendent Telephone Association, and 
Miss Julia S. O'Connor, President 
Boston Telephone Operators' Union. 

In a long statement to Joint Chair- 
men Walsh and Taft, of the Na- 
tional War Labor Roard, President 
Williams, of the Rrooklyn Rapid 
Transit Company protested against 
the War Labor Roard investigating 
charges that the company has vic- 
timized members of the Brother- 
hood of Locomotive Engineers. 
Messrs. Walsh and Taft gave re- 
spectful hearing while the statement 
was being read and then continued 
their inquiry. President Williams in- 
sisted that his company should not 
be dominated by "outside influences," 
and that a "union" maintained by 
the company is entirely satisfactory. 
One witness testified tfiat an in- 
spector notified him he could choose 
between the company and the 
brotherhood, and that within three 
weeks after he joined the brother- 
hood he received sixty demerit 
marks. When an employe receives 
this number of demerits he is auto- 
matically discharged. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Office Phone Elliott 11M 



Established 1S90 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-Date Methods In Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

COMPASSES ADJUSTED 

500-1 SECURITIES BLDQ. Next to U. S. Steamship Inspectors' Office 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofnce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 

not be held longer than 30 days from 

date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mall forwarded 
during that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mall until arrived. 

Ahlstrom, Ellis Lldsten, Chris. 

Anderson, P. W. Lee. C. L. 

Anderson, Wm. Lubhurs, H. J. 
Antonsen, Charlie H.Lundgren, Chas. 

Aso, Guss Larsen, Ed. 

Anslltz, John Larson, Gust 

Abolln, K. Lux, Chas. 

Aase, O. R. Malk, Peter 

Andersen, Julius Mathison, Martin 

Anderson, Andrew Mlcholsen, A. 

Anderson, J. E. McGregor, D. 

Andersen, A. C. Maher, Thomas 

Andersen, Martin McLeod, John 

Andersen, John Magnusen, Lars 

Albregtsen, G. Marthlnson, Krs. 

Austin, H. Mlkkelsen, K. -1620 

Anderson. Fredhof Mlkkelsen, Holder 

Anderson, T. -2W>4 Mlckelsen, Harald 

Backshom, C. F. McGilllvray, F. B. 
Barry, W. D. 

Bates, J. D. McDonald, Wm. 

Brown, Albert McPherson, James 

Brink, Harald Moe, Albert 

Bensen. J. A. Moore, Thomas 

Back, M. Moore, J. M. 

Barry, B. Muler. James 

Boacher, G. Nelsson, Emll 

Balstad. Alp Nelson, C. R. 

Bradburry, Edw. Nordfeldt. T. F. 

Burke, John Nelson, W. 

Carlsen, Oscar Nelsen, Steve 

Carlson, Harald Nelson, Svend F. 

Camper, L F. Ness, Louis 

Carlson, Eric Norrls, T. F. 
ChHstnffprsen, johnNyhagen, Julius 
Cunningham Geo. F.Nelsen, Hans L. 

Caspersen, E. T. Nare, H. 

Carruthers, M. Nolan, J. 

Carlson, C. A. Nordstrom, John 

Carlson. J. -1586 Overland, Oscar 

Carlsen, C. G. Olsen, Harald 

Christensen, E. J. Olsen, Ole J. -542 

Crumlich. F. Olsen, Hjalmar 

Curran, W. Olsen, J. G. F. 

Drage, J. Ogga, Edward 

Desmond, C. Odall, E. W. 

Dunwoody, Geo. Olsen, O. P. -1141 

Raton. I. N. Olsen. Alf. 

Eekholm, B. Olsen. Geo. M. 

Erlson, Frank Olsen, B. 

Endresln, I. Olsen, Elmer 

Edman, O. -551 Olliver, James 

Eriekson. Chas. Pakkl, Emll 

Erlksen, Erik Pap, Johannes 

Ellingsen, Erling Powell. H. A. 

Forslund, Victor Paase. And 

Fpreuson, B. Pallesen, K. 

Flansburg, Ira Petersen, John 

Feenes, I. O. Pendvllle, N. 

Fenwlck, A. Petersen, B. 

Fernqulst, C. W. Petterson. Oscar 

Forshlng, J. M. Rasmussel, Ole 

Oronlund. Oscar Rosen, E. H. 

Oabrlelsen, Peder Rallo, Max. 

Glrndlsson, Ed. Rumqulst, Gust 

Gronseth, Johan Ryberg, T. 

Gronroos, E. Rydquist, C. H. 

Grant, J. J. Rasmussen, Paul 

Oundersen, And. Rasmussen, R. P. 

Gustafson, Oscar Rlsbech. H. 

Gunderson, C. A. Reld, W. R. 

Hanson. Ole Ring, W. 

Hansen. Henrich Rise. D. L. 

Hansen, Olaf Rod, S. 

Henricksen, Ch. Ryan, Thos. 

Heckola, S. Rylander, R. 

Hpnrlckson, Victor Sandberg, Otto 

Hprnos, C. Sedon, Geo. 

Henrlksen. Geo. Snell, Adolf 

HJorth, Knud Soderberg, Albin 

Hollman. W. C. Swanson. J. -1331 

Hohnstrom, Fritz Sund. Alex. 

Holmes, C. Seyfreid, M. 

Holten. Crist Stotzerman. Emll 

Hunter, G. H. Swanson, Wm. 

Hansen, Laurltz Sagura, John 

Emll Sandanger, Ole 

Hllliard, C. R. Sarin 

Halvorsen. Hans J. Sauer. Ernie 

Hansen,, S. -2072 Ramuplsen, Harold 

Hetman, J. Selander, W. 

TIerlltz. I. Skldsmo, W. A. 

Ingelbretson, O. E. Strangard, C. 

Iversen. Ole Sorensen, G. T. 

Jennings, Harry Sorensen, J. N. 

Johnson, Angl ' Saenlla, Arvid 

Johnson. Herman Svenson, Edwin 

Joal, M. B. Thorsen. Herman 
Johnson, C. A. -2044Farve, J. O. 

Jospfson, Ben Tempde, A. H. 

.lulls-son, C. A. Torgesen, Laurlts 

Jensen. G. Thoresen, I. N. 

Jarzenbeck, J. Trygg, Gust 

Jensen, Henrv Tornqulst. H. 

Johnson, Olaf Wurst, Walter 

Jorgenson. Wm. Walker, J. H. 
Jorgenson. Fredrick Wlrtanen, Geo. 

Krueger, Johan Winther, T. 

Kallanen, M. J. Wlnstrom, Oscar 
Karlson, G. A. -1190WIrta, G. 

Kattel. Joseph Wahlstrom, Eric 

Karlson. Ingvald Webach, S. 

Klufr, W. Walsh, E. 

Kramer, Otto Westgaard, John 

Kullch, John West. Joseph 

Larsen, Martin Ween, O. 

T.arsen, Fred Wplln, I. 

Larsen, A. B. Wilson, B. G. 

I,awson, Arthur Wilson, A. B. 
Larsen, Nils Package. 

I.arsen, Pete Johnson, Oscar 



EUREKA, CAL. 
Mercantile Lunch 

Is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy & Haakon's 

Proprietors 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

612 Fourth Street - Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY A YOUNG 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



A GOOD CUP'OF COFFEE 



— or — 



A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER A. HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIO BTORE8 

Store No. 1 — Cor. Main and First 

Store No. 2— Westlak* and Pins 

SEATTLE 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Creamatory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. 8. SMITH 
Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor in New York Nautical College. 
Room 4140 ARCADE BUILDING 
Third Floor, First Avenue Slds 
8EATTLE, WASH. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



Sailors' Outfitter 
BENJAMIN'S 

The Old Reliable 

CLOTHING. SHOES. HATS. RUBBER 

AND OIL CLOTHING 

207 Second Street Eureka, Cal. 

E. BENJAMIN, Prop. 



Cigars and Tobaccos 

Periodicals 
F. W. MOGENSEN 

217 E STREET EUREKA, CAL. 



DRUGS, KODAKS, 

STATIONERY 
The REXALL Store 

ATKINSON A WOODS 
F STREET. Cor. 2d. EUREKA. CAL. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention The Sea- 
men's Journal. 



Aberdeen, Wash , Letter List 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention The Sea- 
men's Journal. 



Albers, Geo. 
Anderson, J. A. 
Andersen, Olaf 
Berquist, T. 
Browen, Alexander 
Burmcister, T. 
Braun, Alex. 
Bjerk, G. T. 
Brun, Mattla 
Brant, Max 
Barrot, G. 
Brandt, H. 
Bengtson, S. 
Davis, John 
Eliassen, H. C. 
Hedrick. Jack 
High, Edward 
Jansson, John 
Jansson, J. A. 
Johanssen, John F. 
Johnsen, Hans 
Johnson, Hilmar 
Khamp, S. 



KanKaanpaa, J. E. 
Lehtonen, A. 
Markman. H. 
Malkoff. Peter 
Melners, Herman 
Magnusson, Charles 
Newman, I. 
Olsen, A. 
Olson, W. 
Olsen, Alf 
Olsen, Ferdenan 
Petersen, Harry 
Pedersen, Alf. 
Rahlf, J. 
Risenius, Sven 
Rosenblad. Otto 
Svenson, B. 
Svenson. Gustaf 
Torln, Gustaf A. 
Thompson, Alex. 
Valfors. Arvid 
Williams, T. C. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

S1B-817 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING. HATS. 

SHOES. COLLARS. SUSPENDERS. 

GLOVES. OVERALLS. SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - • Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN. Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders Taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

Cor. First and Commercial Sts., 
Aberdeen, Wash. 
Cor. Heron and F. Sts., 
Raymond, Wash. 



Phone 263 



>» 



"Ole and Charley 

"The Royal" 
"The Sailors' Rest" 

Cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
21» EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH. 



TACOMA, WASH. 
HARRY W. LEVY 

CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS 
Union Made Goods, Hats, Shoes, 

Trunks and Suitcases 

Fishermen's and Sailors' Supplies 

(OLD TOWN) Tacoma, Wash. 

Main Itfl 



SMOKERS Se * th *. t **"• ubeI < in k* 11 * blue ^ app**™ on *« 

box in which you are served. 

Issued by Auuionlyoi the Ciga/ Makers' International Union of America 

isjjv Union-made Cigars. 

•-i Nil «l*liar»0f I HI rjG«IUM«J'linr.illuTI0llHUMON(» Ajwrtj. inoruiuaKoitevotMtlftlM. 

X:| «m»NiiftkeHoiuijuTO)vuii<di«munui>«uiiui[0f txcratC i»rri«. 

liV'^mJY'l Vm " Clw " u '" v""" UmuIdmi tt» mav 

ViXjJ^yKJf tliVu^uttUntuiMia irttl ralte pu»ited tcari*, l» u«. 

' CttlUtf 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 




In the name of the women of Flanders, 
Who are ploughing the German fields, 

Yoked to the ox and under the lash — 
Buy bonds — lest the country yields. 

In the name of the girls and the children— 
The Belgian, the Serb, and the f rench- 

You know what a German victory means. 
Buy bonds for a stronger trench. 

In the name of our murdered seamen, 
Of hospitals bombed from the sky, 

In the name of Good Friday in Paris, 
In the name of Decency— buy! 

— LUCY PRICE. 

! 

BUY Fourth Liberty Bonds Any Bank Will Help You 



Ho 



me 



N 



ews 



It cost $12,000,000 to collect $3,- 
694,703,334 Governmental taxes in the 
fiscal year ended June 30. This is at 
the rate of $3.24 per thousand, the 
lowest cost in the history of the 
Internal Revenue Bureau. 

• The hoggishness of the C. A. 
Goodyear Lumber Company in Wash- 
ington State is blocking the Govern- 
ment's efforts to secure spruce lum- 
ber for the building of air planes, 
;md Uncle Sam has started con- 
demnation proceedings against this 
concern. The company rejected every 
reasonable price offered by the Gov- 
ernment. 

"Returning soldiers should not be 
compelled to go to distant places to 
locate while people in their own 
neighborhoods own large areas of 
unused land," said Frank P. Walsh, 
of the National War Labor Board, 
in an address to charity workers at 
Washington, D. C. "Persons having 
more land than they can use," he 
said, "should be compelled to srll 
to the Government at a fair price 
that it may be distributed among the 
returned soldiers. In this light for 
democracy we must make sure that 
serfdom is not recognized in our 
own country." 

Over 400 educational institutions 
have accepted the War Department's 
contract to place facilities at the 
nation's service for the military and 
academic training of their students 
under army control. These students 
number approximately 150,000. They 
will receive the pay of a private 
in the army and will be fed, housed 
and clothed by the Government. Tt 
is arranged to devote eleven hours 
a week to strictly military subjects, 
drill and physical training and forty- 
two hours a week to lectures, recita- 
tions and other preparations usually 
found in a college curriculum. 

The United States Railroad Ad- 
ministration asks persons who would 
submit new railroad devices for the 
consideration of the administration 
to observe the following rules: Cor- 
respondence relating to locomotives 
or cars should be addressed to 
United States Railroad Administra- 
tion, Frank McManamy, Assistant 
Director, Division of Operation, 
Washington. Correspondence re- 
lating to roadway and track should 
be addressed United States Railroad 
Administration, C. A. Morse, Assist- 
ant Director, Division of Operation, 
Enginering and Maintenance, Wash- 
ington. 

Provost Marshal General Crowdcr 
has announced that a drive against 
slackers in ship yards uncovered 20,- 
000 draft registrants who tried to 
evade the call to service by obtaining 
employment with the United States 
Emergency Fleet Corporation. At 
Cramp's shipyard in Philadelphia 
some employes suspended work in 
disgust because of the antics of these 
slackers who had secured positions as 
sub-foremen. Among them were 
pugilists and ball players who would 
order skilled ship builders to "go 
down in the cellar," when they mcani 
the hold of the vessel, and "go up 
stairs." when the}' referred to the 
deck. One worker declared that 
skilled men are "doing their damned 
est" to build ships, but are interfered 
with by these incompetents. V 
ers suggest that if there is less dis- 
cussion about sports and more en- 
ergy displayed in getting ships into 
the water the war will end more 
quickly. 



14 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




Twenty- four men, comprising tlic 
crew of the fishing schooner "Gloam 
ing," df Lunenburg, N. S., have been 
picked up in dories near St. Pierre, 
Mif|. They reported their vessel sunk 
by a German submarine. 

The Federal Government has char- 
tered the "Mandeville," formerly the 
"Hanover," from the Louisiana 
Transport & Ferry Co., for use as 
a training ship for the merchant 
marine. The "Mandeville" operated 
for a number of years on Lake 
Pontchartrain. 

Last year the International Mer- 
cantile Marine Company made a 
profit of 22 per cent, on its pre- 
ferred stock. Its annual report 
shows a surplus of $15,475,985, after 
meeting all fixed charges and oper- 
ating expenses, including cost of 
repairs, maintenance and overhauls. 
Moises Huerta, the Spanish sculp- 
tor, has completed the model for 
a monument dedicated to the vic- 
tims of the "Lusitania," which is to 
be erected on the seashore near 
Boston. The monument represents 
the earth drawing from the 
bed the bodies of the torpedoed ves- 
sel's victims. 

To better provide for fire pro- 
tection along the Delaware and 
Schuylkill River fronts where mil- 
lions of dollars arc being expended 
in new piers and warehouses, it is 
proposed to have as many tugs as 
it is possible equipped with power 
pumps and hose to assist in fighting 
fires. 

The Delaware Shipbuilding & Re- 
pair Co., of Philadelphia, has ac- 
quired about twelve acres at Beach 
and Frie streets, Camden. X. L, ad- 
joining the shipyards of Quigley & 
Dorp, which will be used for the 
construction of a shipyard and re- 
pair works. It is understood that the 
plant will be equipped for the pro- 
duction of ocean-going barges of 
about 2500 tons capacity. 

The American Screw Propeller 
Co., of Philadelphia, designers of 
screw propellers and propulsive ex- 
perts, advise that they have de- 
signed the propellers for over 450 
vessels now building or on contract 
and that their clientele consists of 
nearly fifty of the largest American 
and Canadian shipyards, ten promi- 
nent steamship lines, eight naval 
architectural and engineering con- 
cerns, and a number of engine 
builders. 

Shipping Board energies are, it is 
understood, to be directed toward 
the discovering the cost 

of vessels building in American 
shipyards. This program will be 
formulated at a conference to be 
held next week by Edward N. Hur- 
ley, Charles M. Schwab and Charles 
Piez. The purpose is to determine 
the cost of steel, wood and com- 
te ship production and to make 
a comparison of prices in this coun- 
try with those of foreign countries. 

Shipyards along the Eastern 
board will be requested gradually to 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 29th, 1918 

Assets $59,397,625.20 

Deposits 55,775,507.86 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,286,030.34 

Employees' Pension Fund ------- 284,897.17 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK, President 

GEO. TOUKNY, Vice-Pies, and Mgr. A. H. P.. SCHMIDT, Vice-Pies, and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE. Vice-President 

WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier 

A. H. MULLER, Secretary 
WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary 
GOODFELLOW, EELS, MOORE & ORRICK, 
General Attorneys 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
JOHN A. BUCK A. H. R. SCHMIDT A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY 1. N. WALTER E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. T. KRUSE HUGH GOODFELLOW ROBERT DOLLAR 



Solvin, Oscar E. 
Sorensen, Georg 
Sorensen, J. H. 
Sorensen, Jorgen 
Sorensen. O. E. 
Spatz, K, 
Stenuesen, Gust. 
Sternberg, Alf. 



Strybos, D. 

Svanson, William 
Svendsen, S 
Svensson, John 
Sveeingsen, S. V. 
Swansen, A. 
Swensen, Anker 
Swenson, Rubin 



or-" • ¥ Y * .(Johnson, Norman 

ban r rancisco Letter List Johnson, uie 

Johnson, Oscar \\ . 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from the date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
S. A. Silver, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



Aagaard, A. M. 
Ackerman, Vaifred 
Adolfsson, John 
Aluwe, Joe 
Ampuja, Anton 
Andersen, -1846 



Anderson, Andrew 
Anderson, Carl J. 
Anderson, C. N. 

Anderson, L. 
Anderson, Oskar L. 
Andersson, \V. 



Andersen, A. T. C. Andersson, C. J. 

Andersen, Frank Andersson, Erick 

Andersen, H. -2127 Andersson, Stun; 

Andersen, John Ask, Alfred E. 

Andersen, M. -2054 Ask, Lorentz 

Andersen, Nils F. Auckland, Gus 

Andersen, Rasmus Azarov, Daniel 

Baah, M. Birhnes, Ole A. 

Babchuck, Ernest Blixt, Gus 

Backman, A. -2056 Blomgren, Carl A. 



Backman, Paul 
Bahn, C. F. 
Barry, Dick 
Barry, Wm. J. 
Bausback, Erwin 
Benrowitz, Felix 
Benstrom, Axel 
Bergesen. Berger 
Berner. Albert 
Berseth, R. J. 
Borthelsen, Chas. 
Bertelson, Oscar 
Billington, M. 
Biron, E. 
Bjork, Martin C. 

Calem, Anthony 
Carlsen, Albln 
Carlson, Carl 
Carlson, Seth 
Carlson, Warner 
Carlson, C. S. 
Carsten, A. 

z, Mariano 



Blomgren, Fred 
Blomgren, M. A. 
Blomkvist, Albert 
Borgesen, Oscar 
Borjesen, L. 
Bouma, Jan 
Bower, Claude S. 
Brevick, Johan 
Brian, Jos. 
Brown. George W. 
Brue, Nils 
Brunwald, Harry 
Bye, Kristian 
Bywater, c. E. 

Christensen, Oskar 
Christensen, Otto 
Christensen, Victor 
Christoffersen, C. 
Crosiglio, Joseph 
Colima, Pete 
Colman, A. J. 
Conolly, Obert 



Chilberg. Benjamin Cornelius, Lemnart 



Christensen, C. 
Christensen, L. 

Dahlgren, W. A. 
Dahlstrom, Ernst 
Dahlstrom, G. M. 
Daniels, L. M. 
Davey, Chas. 



Corran, Geo. 
Corson, Geo. 

Dew Pree, Earl 
Didriekson, Martin 
Dobbin, Harry 
Donk, Johan 
Dreyer, Jack O. 



Davidson, Waldemar Dukatz, H. 



De Moss, E. 
Delong. K. 
i leswert, w. 
Ek, Chas. 
Eliassen, Adolf E. 
Engellen, D. A. 
Engstrom, Ben. 
Ericksen, Pete 
Erickson, George 

Fagerlie, Odell 
Falk, Axel 
Fallon, William 
Fernquist, C. W. 
Felsch, William 
Fernstrom, Fred 
Flcht, Arthur 
Fingerling, E. 
Fisher, G. A. 



Dumas, Clifford 
Dunwoody, Geo. 
Dyer, John 
Erickson, Gustav 
Erickson, Nils 
Esterberg, Gust. 
Etherton, Ward 
Ettrup, Jens 
Evensen, Andrew 

Flem, Knut 

Fomichoff, T. 
Franzell, A. Th. 
Fraser, Alexander V. 
Fraser, Charles 
Fraser, James 
Fredrlksen, B. D. 
Freidland, Carl J. 
Fritz, Henry 



Fjeldstad, John O. Frost, Konge 

Fjellman, George Frost, Peter 

Garcia, Jose Gray, Hamilton 

Garfield, G. Green, Laurence 

Geschwend, Walter Gregg, Harry B. 

Ujesdahl, Elling Gulbranson, B. 

Gonzales, Francisco Gulfeldt, A. 

Graham, Walter F. Gusgron, Joseph 
Gran, Aksel 
Grant, August 
Grant, Lewis 



Halvorsen, Erllng 
Ilalvorsen, Henry 
Halvorsen, Olaf 
Hamm, R. 
Hamren, T. 
Hansen, Antonius 
Hansen, Chris. 
Hansen, Hans 



Hansen, Oscar 
adapt their yards to build one Hansei. Rangvald 



standard type of ship instead of 
two or more, as at present, says 
Charles Piez, vice-president and gen- 
eral manager of the "Emergency 
Fleet Corporation. The idea of thus 
standardizing the work in the ship- 
yards is to speed up produ* 
The Pusey & Jones Co. will | 
ably construct 12,000-ton ships after 
present contracts arc concluded, 
while the ships at Hog Island will 
probably all be of the 7500-ton 
class. 



i, Raynols 
Hanson, Edward 
Hartvlg, Walter 
Hay, C. W. 
Heldal. Trygoe H. 
Deis, J. S. 
Henrlksen. C. 
Hesketh, Robert 
Heyn, Thorvald 

Jacobson, Emil 
Irmy, Feodor 
Jacos, Henrik 
.Takobsen, Anders 
Jamsa, Johan 
Jansson, Fredrik 
Jensen, Christ. 
Jensen, Gust. 
Jensen, Jens R. 
Jensen, Lorentz 
Jewett, Charles 



Gustavsen, Anton 
Gussum, Joe 
Guthrie, R. 

Hildes. W. 
Hill -1387 

Hill, — -2030 
Him, Albert 
Hobbs, Frank 
Holm, Astrip 
Holm, Nils W. 
Holmes, Fred 
Holmes, W. 
Holmgren, H. 
Holmstrom, Carl A. 
Holmstrom, Fritz 
Hovde, Michal 
Howe, Albert 
Hubbard, Howard 
Hubbert. John L. 
•Hylander, Gustaf 
Hyskell, T. J. 

Johannesen, Hegle 
Johannesen, Johan 
Johansen, A. -2412 
Johansen, Fritz 
Johansen, John 
Johanson, A. -2050 
Johanson, Knut 
Johanson, Robert 
Johnsen, G. 
Johnson, Ralph 
Johansson. Bernard 



Johnston, Leslie 

Kaktin, Ed. 
Kallberg, Arvid 
Karlson, Axel 
Karlsson, Jonan 
Karusmoli, Karl 
Kasklnen. A. 
Kearns, N. 
Kelly. E. -1050 
Kjellsson, Axel 
Knaut, Charles 
Knockenhauer, H. 

Larsen, Alf 
Larsen, Arthur 
Larsen, U. 
Larsen, II. 
Larsen, K. -iduu 
Larsen, Ingolf 
Larson, Cornelius 
Larson, L. A. 
Leinasar, Jacob 



Jones, E. L. 
Jones, Fred 
Jordan, Henry 
Jorgensen, Robert 

Knudsen, Daniel 
Koppel, John 
Korbee, H. J. 
Koskinen, Waino 
Kosoff, I. 
Koster, Walter 
Kraut, Charles 
Kristensen, L. P. J. 
Kroeger, waiter 
Kruse, Chas. 
Kurgrel, Oles 

Lindblad, Conrad 
Lindros, G. J. 
Lindquist, Charley 
Lindquist, Ralph 
Linsner, Paul 
Long, C. L. 
Lubbers, ■ Henrick 
Ludvigsen, P. L. 
Lundberg, Thorn 



Letchford, AlexanderLundmark, Helge 

Lewis, Harry S. Lynch, James 

Lewis. Owen J. Lyngaard, George 
Lincoln, H. A. 

MacManUB, 1'. Mess, William 

Madsen, Jack Meyer, H. 

Madsen, Tom Meyer, Hans 

Mugiiuson, Magnus Miatas, Nieolai 

Malmgren, Oskar Michelsen, Harry. 



Martinsen, Nordal 
Marshall, E. K. 
Martinsen, John 
Mathiesen, Axel 
Mathusen, L. 
McCormlck, Law- 
rence 
MeUiliivray, F. B. 



Mllnor, C. D. 
Mjaanes, Jonan 
Moller. A. E. 
Moller, F. A. 
Monroe, John 
Monsen, Birger 
Monson, Carl E. 
Morrison, Phillip 



McLeod, Norman A.Mortensen, B. 



MeNair, H. 8. 
Melander, Gust. 
Melander, J. lv. 

Nannestad, A. 
Neilson, Neil 
Nelson, Carl C. 
Nelson, Charlie 
Nelson, N. P. 



Moseley, T. E. 

Mulley, James 



Nilsson, Axel 
Nilsson, Reinholt 
Nolen, Axel 
Nordby, Jacob 
Nord, Clarence 



Newman, Gustav A. Noruenberg. J. 



Nielsen, C. 
Nielsen, Harald J. 
Nielsen, Kristian 
Nilsen, Conrad 
Nilsen, Hans L. 
Nilsen, Ole E. 
Alison, iijalmar 
Nilson, Nat 

Oakley, Loren D. 
obcrg, Einar 
uieldi, C. 
Okesson, Erick 
ulausen, Christian 
Olesen, Ingwald 
Olgrein, Verner 
Olmstead, Harry 
Olsen, Charley 
Olsen, Hans 
Olsen, Herman 

Paal, 

Palm, Torval L. 

Palu, G. 

Panchot, Herbert 

Paulsen, Karl 

Parks, Leslie 

Parral, Olegario 

Paulsen, Aksel 

Pedersen, Eysten 

Pederson, Cnaries 

Pedersen, Peter B. Powell, H. A. 



Nordling, Sam 
Nordstrom, Enst 
Nordstrom, Hans 
Norling, Gust. 
Norton, Emil 
Nurkin, H. 
Nutelier, Lyle P. 

Olsen, Johan S. 
Olsen, Karl 
Olsen, Kristoff 
Ulsen. Ole -1325 
Olsen, Oskar 
Olsen, Peter 
Olsen, Regmar 
Olson, Albert 
Olson, Andrew \V. 
Ulson, John 

Peterson, Harry J. 
Peterson, O. -1551 
Peterson, Robert 
Pierce, William B. 
Pietch, Frank 
Pllcher, H. J. 
Pinkiert, C. B. 
Pint, G. H. 
Pope, B. 
Porter, J. 



Pederson, Oluf 
Pedersen, Sofus R. 
Perkins, Will 

Quickman, \V. " 
Quilje, Johannes 
Quinn, William 

Radke, Paul 

Bam, E. 

Ramstad, Andreas 

Rasmussen, Jack A. Rop, Albert 

Kasmusseli. S. A. Rosen, Vail lid 



Powell. Patrick 
Putkka, Werner 



Qulrage, Juan 
Qvanstrom, Arvid 

Roesberg, Chas. V. 
Roos, Yrjo O. 
Ronn, E. 



Kedinger, M. 
Retmer, Peter M. 
Rlngdahl. Karl 
Roach, Alfred 
Roed, T. A. 

Sandkvist, Eeik 
Sandstedt. E. H. 
Sandstrom, O. H. 
Sanne, Rudolph 
Sounders, O. 
Sarin, Charlies 
Sarin, Wllnelm A. 



Ruckmlch, A. 
Ruger, Harry W. 
Rundstrom, Albert 
Ryan, Patrick 

Schmidt, C. 

Simensen, Arne 
Simpson, L. C. 
Smith, John 
Smith, John T. 
Smyth, Joseph P. 
Speekmann, M. 



Taival. Alfred Thorsen, Thor 

Talbert, Frank Tiller, Edward 

Tanman, Robert Tilt, Clifford 

Thomas, Henry Tobiason, Joel 

Thomas, Nelson Tomson, Charley 

Tliomsen, Ben Toutt, Walter 

Thor, Lauri Trimmer, David 
Thorngren, Chas. G. 
Uhlen, Jack 

Vadum, Kristoffer Van Orsdol, C. 

Van Vleet, T. B. Vera, Oscar 
Van Graff, Jan 

Wachter, John Wlhavalnen, Geo. 

Wagner, Ralph W. Wilkinson, George 

Wake, John Williams, John L. 
Wallenstrand. HarryWilllams. T. C. 

Ward, Carl Wilson, Williams 

Welsson. Emil Wink, Pete 

Wesgard, Jens Winkler, Otto 

West, I. Whitby, G. 
Westren, Christ. 



Westvik, I. 
Wlchman, Daniel 
Wicklund, T. 

Young, W. H. 

Zerltt, John 



Wolstenholm, 

Thomas 
Wunt, Walter 



Zetergren, E. 



PACKAGES. 



Ekwall, Gust A. 
Enstrom, Carl M. 
Fagerberg, Ivan 
Frazer, Alex V. 
Halvorsen, Elmer 
Irmey, Fred 
Johnson, Carl 
Johnson. Ivar 
Jurgenson, Julius 
Kerr, H. J. 
Malmqulst, E. J. 



Mortensen. J. C 
Mourlce, Francis 
Nelson. A. -1092 
Olson, Knut 
Osterholm, John W. 
Paal, K. 
Roach, Alfred 
Smith, John T. 
Wesgaaru. Jens 
Zeaberg, Jack 



REGISTRATION CARDS. 

Allias, W. Hinsen, Andrew L. 

Andreson, Andor J. Johnson, Olaf V. 

Anderson, Jack J. Larson, John W. 

Blair, Bernard Lauritsen, Ole 

Braumiller, EL Mattesen, Hans 

Campani, Juan Mattson, Johan H. 

Cariera, Peter Nail, Elijio 

Carlman, David Navano, Casinino 

Dewlin, Charles J. Nordstrom, Gustaf E. 

Elonen, John Pederson, Carl 

Ferguson, Emmet Peterson, Alfred 

Finna, Maranda Sandell, John A. 

Grussman, Alec G. Sandstrom, Iver 

Hagburg, Gust. Soderlund, J. 

Halvorsen, Olaf Wickman, Peter 

Highland, Daniel Wright, William H. 



Alaska Fishermen 

San Francisco. 

Abramsen, David H. Larsen, Olof 
Berg, John 
Blom, John 
Boman, H. 
Burg, John 
Bywater, Chas. 
Duggan, Thomas 
Guilefsen, Hans 
Helander, John 
Johansson, Arva 
Johanson, Clias. 
Johanson, Hans 
Johnson, John 
Knight, H. 
Kolinen, Oscar 
Kuhn, John 
Kyardalen, Ole 
I lansen 



Mattson, Chas. 
Mittchel, Joseph 
Moberg, Oscar 
Nannestad, Arthur 
Olander, E. P. 
Olson, Anskar 
Ostberg, Ansgar A 
Olsen, Peter E. 
Paulsen, Axel J. 
Sakarias, Rod. 
Sheldon, C. B. 
Simmonds, J. 
Steen, J. I. 
Tamlsar, Peter 
Weber. Fred 
Wickman. Daniel 
Welsham, R. 



Tacoma Letter List. 

Carlstrand, Gustaf Meyer, Karl 
Hoffman, Fred 
Holmstrom, Carl 
Houge, Anton 
rg, Wm. 
Krane, I. I. 
Larson, Alexander 
Maglll, Michel 
Magnusson, E. W. 
Martinsson, E. 



Nielsen, Niels -751 
Olsen, Emil 
Talken, G. 
Bertelsen, Bertel 
Pettersson, -1287 
Revhelm, Oscar 
Seyfried, M. -2962 
Swansen, Carl 



You Want the Truth 

This year there will be stirring times 
In the Nation. Under government cen- 
sorship It Is increasingly difficult for 
the average man to get the real mean- 
ing of the social and political move- 
ments of the day. 

LA FOLLETTE'S 
MAGAZINE 

will be specially represented at Wash- 
ington and will analyze and present tne 
news from the capital truthfully and 
fairly. Senator La Follette Is making a 
real fight to lift some of the tax bur- 
dens from tne common people and place 
them where they belong — on excess 
profits, war profits and surplus fortunes 
and Incomes. Because of this he Is be- 
ing attacked more bitterly than any 
other mm In publlo life. 

Send In your order today. 

$1.00 Per Year— Agents Wanted 

La Follette's Magazine, Madison, Wis. 



Johannesen, Anthon Johnson, Hjalrnar 




WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

JOE WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 

Exclusively 

28 EAST STREET, near Market 



*aEsJ 



Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 1619 
Repairing Done While You Walt, by the Latest Machinery 

Work Called For and Delivered 
WE USE ONLY THE'. BEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 




WS.S. 



TOR SAYINGS STAMPS 

ISSUED BY THE 

UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 25, 35 and 50 cents per day, 
or $1.50, $2 to $2.50 per week, with all 
modern conveniences. Free Hot and 
Cold Shower Bath on every floor. Ele- 
vator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager 



Phone Garfield 2457 



HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 

Res., Randolph 27 
Office Hours, 9 a. m. to 6:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

(JNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goodi 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 

Prices. :: :: Union Made Goods Only. 

103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Residence, 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 

Phone Douglas 1415 San Francisco 



French American 
Bank of Savings 

Savings and Commercial 



108 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

RESOURCES, $10,000,000 

Member of Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco 

United States Depository for 
Postal Savings Funds 

DIRECTORS 

G. Beleney J. M. Dupas 

J. A. Bergerot John Glnty 

S. Blssinger J. S. Godeau 

Leon Bocaueraz Arthur Legallet 

O. Bozio Geo. W. McNear 

Charlee Csrpy X. De Plchon 



Phone Douglas 3725 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 East Street, San Francisco 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 

OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



Jortall Bros. Express 

Stand and Baggage Room 
— at — 
212 EAST ST., San Francisco 
Phone Douglas 5348 



ONLY ONE BIG STORE 

Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

NAUTICAL BOOKS AND 
INSTRUMENTS 

Simple Rules and Problems in Navigation 

By CHARLES H. CUGLE 

Price, $3.50 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes, Etc. 

D. W. PAUL, Outside Representative 

36-40 STEUART STREET 

Southern Pacific Building 

Telephone Douglas 1082 



News from Abroad 



RELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 

716 MARKET STREET— at Third and Kearny 



UNION MADE 
IN OUR OWN SHOP 



Represented by 
E. PEGUILLAN 




SUITS AND 

OVERCOATS 

to Order at Popular 
Prices 




JACOB PETERSEN & SON 
Proprietor! 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee, and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
SAN FRANCTSCO 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN & NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO ST., near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

•Nuf Sed 



Portland, Or., Letter List 



Anderson, Martin 

Anderson, Albert 

Albertsen, Peter 

Anderson. C. 

Ahren, Wm. J. 

Baekman, Peter W. 

Brandt, Arvld 

Bohm, Franz 

Cariera, Peter 

Carlson, Carl G. 

Christensen, II. P. 

Danielsen, Eric 

Dahl, Ludwig J. 

Elliot, Austin E. 

Eriksen, C. 

Eikland. Ole 

Guildersen, W. E. 

Guthrie, V. A. 

Geiger, Joe 

Graaf, John D. 

Henriksen, Henrik 
G. V. 

Hoffnieistcr. M. A. 

Harding, Ellis 

Hartman, Fritz 

Henricksen, Chris- 
tian G. 

Halligan. Thomas 

Hauschild, B. 

Heckert, Bill 

Hofoker, Fritz 

Johansson, Charles 
-2407 

Johnson, Karl 

Jorgenson, Earl 

Jensen, H. T. 

Johansen, Johan 

Johnson, Emll P. 

Jakohsson. K. J. W. 

Johnson, Herman 

Jensen, Gotfrid 

Jespersen, Martin 

Johnson, • '. A. 

KJellberg, A. C. 



Kane, John 
Kase, A. 
Kaskinen, Albert 
Kristensen, Wm. 
Kelly, Wm. 
Knofsky, E. W. 
Knutsen, Ragnwald 
Laatzen, Hugo 
Larsen, Hans 
Miller, Harry 
Mikkelsen. Harry 
Mattsen, S. H. 
Murphy, Francis Leo 
Nordman, Alek 
Nordling, F. 
Nielsen, Jens 
Nurm, John A. 
Nogat, E. G. 
Nelson, A. S. 
Nelson, Harry 
Ogilvie, Wm. A. 
Olson, J. W. 
Powell. H. A. 
Paulsson, Herman 
Peterson, S. 
Palm, P. A. 
Peterson, Frank A. 
Petersen, Anton 

-1675 
Peterson, Gust. 
Rensmand, Robert 
Rulsgaard, Soren 
Richter, N. 
Siebert, Gust 
Swanson, E. O. 
Swenson, C. E. 
Svenson, Anton 
Tuhkanen. Johnn J. 
Thoresen, Ingwald 
Torjusen, Q. 
Westengren, C. W. 
Warren, Geo. 
Willing, Wm. 
Wold, Frank 



East Street No. 19, near Market 

TAILOR 

To the U. S. Navy 

GEO. A. PRICE 

(IS RIGHT) 

Blues— UNIFORMS— Whites 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING, ETC. 

500 Lockers Free San Francisco, Cal. 



The members of tlic crew of the 
S. S. "Grayson," who rendered sal- 
vage services to the "Lowther 
Grange," will please communicate 
with S. B. Axtell, 1 Broadway, New 
York, N. Y., for their share of sal- 
vage money. 1-30-18 



SAVE 
MONEY 

AND YOU 

SAVE LIVES 

BUY 



WS.S. 

"WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 

JSSUED BY TUB 

UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Thomas F. Noonc, a native of Ire- 
land, born 1887, last heard of in 
New York, Feb. 15, 1918, is inquired 
for by his sister, Mrs. Thomas J. 
Condry, 9 Rosseter St., Great Bar- 
rington, Mass. 10-16-18 



Members of the crew of the SS. 
"Gulf of Mexico" may obtain money 
due them for salvage services ren- 
dered to the bark "Portugal" by 
communicating with Silas B. Axtell, 
Attorney for Seamen's Unions, 1 
Broadway, Room J, New York City. 

10-16-18 



Members of the crew of (lie SS. 
"Kellogg" who were on board when 
she picked up the SS. "Catania" can 
obtain money due them for salvage 
services by communicating with Silas 
B \\tell, Attorney for Seamen's 
Unions, 1 Broadway, Room J, New 
York City. 10-16-18 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention The Sea- 
men's Journal. 



A Belfast shipyard has established 
the world's record by completing a 
vessel in five days after launching. 

A British armed boarding steamer 
was torpedoed and sunk by a Ger- 
man submarine on September 12, the 
British Admiralty announced. Fifty- 
eight members of the crew are mis- 
sing. 

A Budapest report to the Jewish 
Correspondence Bureau states that 
Jews in Galicia have been systemati- 
cally rounded up and robbed, under 
the pretense of special taxation, and 
expelled from the country. 

The disastrous Grey nunnery fire 
at Montreal on February 14 last, in 
which sixty-five babies were burned 
to death, was purposely caused by a 
female orderly of the institution, 
Berthe Courtmanche, who is said to 
have periodical attacks of fire mania. 
She has just confessed. 

The former Russian Dowager Em- 
press and three Princesses and two 
Grand Duchesses, whose names are 
not reported, were burned to death 
about a month after the Russian 
Emperor was shot, according to a 
story reaching London. The source 
of the story is given consideration 
in some quarters, and an investigation 
has been started. 

Cologne, Coblenz and other German 
towns, killing or injuring many per- 
sons, says the Het Volk of Amster- 
dam. The newspaper says the num- 
ber of casualties published in the 
German newspapers are much under 
the actual total. It adds that many 
residents of the towns that are being 
raided are fleeing to Holland for 

Allied airmen are daily bombarding 
safety. 

A circular sent out by the Minister 
of Shipping of Newfoundland give 
warning to all vessel owners in the 
colony that voyages to Sydney, Hali- 
fax and United States ports are for 
the present attended by the greatest 
danger to ships from submarines. 
Shipowners who commission their 
vessels to go to sea after this warn- 
ing, the circular states, do so at 
their own risk. 

The trial by court-martial of 
Giorgio Carpi, Achille Moschini, Gug- 
lielmo Partolini and Mario Azzoni 
on the charge of being implicated 
in the blowing up of the Italian bat- 
tleship "Benedeto Brin" has con- 
cluded. The first two were sen- 
tenced to be shot in the back after 
degradation, and Guglielmo Bartolini 
to hard labor for life after degrada- 
tion. Mario Azzoni was acquitted, 
his guilt not having been proved. 

John W. Davis of West Virginia, 
now Solicitor-General of the United 
States, has been selected by Presi- 
dent Wilson to succeed Walter Hines 
Page as Ambassador to Great Bri- 
tain. The announcement of Davis' 
selection disclosed that he had ar- 
rived safely in Switzerland, where 
he is to head the American delega- 
tion at the Berne conference between 
American and German missions on 
the treatment and exchange of pris- 
oners of war. 

German airplanes have been busy 
bombing the St. Quentin sector in 
France and the enemy utilized a 
number of new type planes of huge 
size. Three of these shot down 
east of Peronnc were capable of 
seating eight men. The most 
astounding thing about them, how- 
ever, was that they carried bombs 
I thirteen feet long, which contained 
[2000 pounds of explosives. This is 
I by far the biggest bomb the Ger- 
mans have yet produced. 



16 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits 



A Right to the Name.— "You call 
that patch a war garden?" 

"Hasn't it the appearance:- Since 
the drought hit it, it looks like a 
ion Of No Man's Land."— V ash- 
ington Star. 



Fair Warning.— Old Gent -Do yon 
think the Germans could really bom- 
bard London with a big gnn? 

Tommy — You never know, guv'nor. 
If you've got any sense you'll leave 
off wearing your best hat. — London 
Opinion. 



( >ne Against Arbitration. — "Reason- 
in' wif a man can't always be de- 
pended on to prevent a fight," said 
Uncle Eben. "Gittin' dc worst of an 
argument is mighty liable to make 
a weak-minded person so mad dat 
he pulls a razor." — Washington Star. 



Remodeled Name. — "Why do you 
keep referring to von Ananias? There 
is no such person mentioned in the 
Bible." 

"I put the 'von' in myself. The 
name of the original mendacity ex- 
pert should be Germanized as much 
as possible." — Washington Evening 
Star. 



Might Be Worse. — "Don't you 
sometimes get tired of explaining to 
your constituents what you have 
been doing in Congress?" 

"No," answered Senator Sorghum, 
"I'm thankful if they give me a 
chance to explain instead of jump- 
ing at their own conclusion." — Wash- 
ington (D. C.) Star. 



Misrepresenting a Bee. — English 
officers and men still experience diffi- 
culties with the language at the front. 
Recently an officer, seeing a swarm 
of bees settled near his billet, rushed 
to adjacent cottages to inform the 
residents. But explain verbally he 
could not. So, taking paper and 
pencil, he drew a rough sketch of a 
hive, then waggled his fingers in 
what he thought the correct wing- 
like way. It was a failure, so he 
sketched a number of bees, and 
buzzed a beesome buzz. Thereupon 
the cottagers, together with one con- 
sent, bolted to their dugouts, believ- 
ing that he meant hostile aircraft 
overhead. — London Dailv Chronicle. 



Children's Accounts 

Your children should be taught to 
save. Open an account for each of 
them to-day. Show them by example 
that you believe in a savings account. 

They cannot start too soon. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Bagley's Gold Shore 

Packed in convenient pocket 
poacher. Contains more good 
Smoking Tobacco for the money 
than any package for« the price. 
Why buy tin goods and pay extra 
for the tins. 



(j-,1 Union 
ij^jvagjA Made 




Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation in the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this . School, keeping 
this always In view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and is now, In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even In the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and In a 
comparatively short interval of time. 




Christensen's Navigation 
School 

Established 190* 

257 HANSFORD BLDQ., 268 MARKET 

STREET 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. 




SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront 
since I 866 — over 50 years. Enough said. 

We DO NOT Supply Mattresses or Bedding to Vessels 

J. COHEN & CO. 



BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 



72 EAST STREET 



Opposite Ferry Post Office 



Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



HENRY HEINZ 



When You Buy 
from Us, Liberty 
Bonds are Ac- 
cepted for Cash. 



Phon* Douglas 6751 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
Original Size 




SOLID GOLD 61.50 
GOLD FILLED .60 



Diamonds 

Watches - 64 market street 

High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



UNION LABEL SHIRTS 

AT FACTORY PRICES 
DIRECT TO WEARER 

EAGLESON & CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO, 1118 Market Street 
Los Angeles, 112-16 So. Spring Street Sacramento, 717 K Street 

Our Union Catalogue of Shirts and Furnishings 

Endorsed by San Francisco Labor Council 

San Francisco Building Trades Council 

San Francisco Label Section 

State Building Trades Council 



Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Silverware 

ScwmenCa 




715 MARKET STREET, Above Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



'amesJ}. Sorenseit 

<fr»3. ana Jrtaxi 
At the Big Red Clock 
and th« Chime*. 



Jewelers, Watchmakers, Opticians 

Big Stock— Everything Marked in Plain Figure* 

THE ONE-PRICE JEWELRY STORE 

FINK WATCH REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 



BUY 

MEN'S 

FURNISHINGS 

AT 




Market at Fifth 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 
Phone Kearny 619 

Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Boots, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing 

of All Kinds, Watches, 

Jewelry, Etc. 

676 THIRD STREET 

At 3rd and Townsend, San Francisco, Cal. 



I Want You 
Seamen 
to wear 

Union 
Hats 

$2.50, $3.50 
$5.00 

"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

Deserves Your Patronage 




Union Store 
Union Clerks 



72 Market Street 

Next to Ocean Market 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 



BCD SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUrAlTUKEBS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phon* Douglas 1660 



OVERALLS & PANTS 

UNION MADE ^ 

ARGONAUT SHIRTS 



CM 






FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 




A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: 


Justice by Organization. 




VOL. XXXII, No. 7. SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1918. 




Whole No. 2509. 



CALIFORNIA'S LABOR CONCLAVE. 



Reports of Delegates to State Federation of Labor Convention. 



To the Sailors' Union of the Pacific: 

Your delegates to the Nineteenth Annual Con- 
vention of the California State Federation of 
Labor, which was held at San Diego, Cal., 
October 7-11, inclusive, hereby respectfully re- 
port as follows: 

With more than 200 delegates from every part 
of the State in attendance, the convention was 
called to order by Walter Barnes, chairman of 
the Convention Committee. Mayor L. J. Wilde 
welcomed the delegates in behalf of the citizens 
of San Diego. Preceding the opening session 
there was a parade of the delegates through the 
principal streets of the city. 

As the first order of business the convention 
by unanimous vote ordered the following tele- 
gram sent to President Wilson: 

October 7, 1918. 
Hon. Woodrow Wilson, 
Washington, D. C. 

We, the delegates attending the nineteenth an- 
nual convention of the California State Federa- 
tion of Labor, representing the organized work- 
ers of California, heartily congratulate the Army, 
Navy and Air Forces on their magnificent de- 
votion and courage. We are confident that the 
bravery shown and the suffering endured by all 
concerned will in the near future secure a lasting 
and triumphant peace for the peoples of the 
world. 

CALIFORNIA STATE FEDERATION 
OF LABOR, 

Daniel C. Murphy, President, 
Paul Scharrenberg, Secretary. 

The reports of the executive officers and or- 
ganizers showed that during the past year the 
organized labor movement of California has 
thrived and prospered notwithstanding the fact 
that thousands of California trade-unionists are 
now with the military and naval forces in our 
war to make the world safe for democracy. 

In Los Angeles, where the opposition of or- 
ganized labor has always been strong, the 
unions had an unprecedented increase in mem- 
bership and many new unions have been or- 
ganized. 

The report of the Secretary showed a net in- 
crease in the membership of the Federation by 
approximately 6500 (making the total 78,000). 
The number of local unions affiliated with the" 
Federation is 486; Central Labor Councils, 21. 

The Federation's finances were shown to be 
in a healthy condition. The total receipts for 
the year were $9428.61. The total disbursements 
amounted to $8985.71. The balance on hand at 
the close of the fiscal year was $4320.52 in cash 
and $1500 in Liberty Bonds. 

Measures on November Ballot. 

The convention went on record upon several 
of twenty-five measures pending before the peo- 
ple of California at the November election. 

Following are the convention's recommenda- 
tions; the ballot numbers and titles being used 
in describing the various measures: 

No. 1 — Liquor Regulation, Initiative Act (the 
so-called Rominger Bill). Vote No. 



No. 4 — Absent Voters, Assembly Constitu- 
tional Amendment No. 1. Vote Yes. 

No. 9 — Appellate Court Divisions, Senate Con- 
stitutional Amendment No. 45. Vote Yes. 

No. 15 — State Budget Board, Senate Constitu- 
tional Amendment No. 15. Vote Yes. 

No. 20 — Health Insurance, Senate Constitu- 
tional Amendment No. 26. Vote Yes. 

No. 22, Prohibition, Initiative Act for Com- 
plete Prohibition. Vote No. 

No. 23 — Workmen's Compensation, Senate 
Constitutional Amendment No. 30. Vote Yes. 

The Reconstruction Programme. 

No less than six different resolutions were 
introduced on various phases of demobilization 
and reconstruction after the war. In reporting 
upon these the Committee on Resolutions made 
the following recommendations: 

"We, your commiUee, have given careful read- 
ing and thoughtful consideration to the various 
resolutions submitted relative to Reconstruction 
after the War. 

"We are keenly alive to the necessity of pre- 
paring for the home-coming of the boys from 
'over there.' 

"Our boys, who in the interest of democ- 
racy responded to the call of the country to 
strangle the military autocracy and make the 
world safe for democracy. 

"The authors of the resolutions being actuated 
by motives of the highest and noblest nature 
have made it a task, indeed, for your committee 
to report upon any one resolution. 

"We wish to commend the spirit that actuated 
the brothers in the preparation of the resolutions, 
realizing that of all the problems claiming the 
attention of society, this question transcends 
all questions in importance and urgency, and 
Organized Labor, being a component part of 
society, is vitally interested in the manner in 
which these boys are received in the communi- 
ties and homes from whence they came, inas« 
much as the wholesale discharge of these men 
without first considering the communities' in- 
terests would throw the industrial machinery of 
the country into chaos and bring great harm 
to the workers, whose interests we are com- 
missioned to guard. Appreciating the thought, 
running like a silver thread through these reso- 
lutions, your committee recommends that this 
matter be referred to a committee of seven to 
be appointed by